VOL.19 ISSUE 31 JUNE 13-19, 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.

COM
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
GREEN PIECE:
DRINK UP - AND STAY
GREEN, P. 25
TIPS FROMA
BARBIE CHICK HITS
THE RUNWAY, P. 57
NORTHEAST FAIR OFFERS A SMORGASBORD OF NOSTALGIA
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staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Dale Culp, Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin,
Amy Longsdorf, Jayne Moore, Mystery Mouth, Kacy Muir, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Jeff & Amanda from 98.5 KRZ,
Jim Rising, Lisa Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas,
Noelle Vetrosky, Danielle Watda
Interns
Alexa Cholewa • Noelle Fabrizio • Nicole Orlando
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com
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Editorial policy
the weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.
Rating system
WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable
* Scarborough Research
Rachel A. Pugh
General manager • 570.831.7398
rpugh@theweekender.com
Steve Husted
Creative director • 570.970.7401
shusted@theweekender.com
John Popko
Sr. account executive • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401
adittmar@theweekender.com
Mike Golubiewski
Production editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
Stephanie DeBalko
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
sdebalko@theweekender.com
Nikki M. Mascali
Editor • 570.831.7322
nmascali@theweekender.com
“Well, that’s easy — funnel
cakes, of course.”
“I’m not good at eating random
food at a bazaar. If I had to pick,
it would be a pizza fritta.”
“Shish kabobs.”
Kieran Inglis
Account executive • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
Shelby Kremski
Account executive • 570.829.7204
skremski@theweekender.com
“Fried dough with some
powdered sugar.”
“Funnel cake.”
“Gyros” “Potato pancakes.”
“Halushki, pierogies, funnel
cake. I could go on and on.”
“Potato pancakes, potato
pancakes and potato pancakes.”
What’s your favorite
bazaar/picnic food?
social
Bill Murray
Online comment
of the week.
20 years ago we had Johnny
Cash, Bob Hope and Steve
Jobs.Now we have no Cash,
no Hope and no Jobs.Please
don’t let Kevin Bacon die.
The Weekender has 9,701
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
Letter from the editor
A
nyone who grew up in or
found their way into NE-
PA knows that summers
here are full of a few sure bets:
Icky humidity, lots of pretty lakes
to beat the heat, millions of bugs
and more than a few great sum-
mer festivals.
Whether it’s at your local fire
company, a fair or a church, good
food is definitely a summer must
in these parts once the season
hits — and everyone’s opinions
on which picnic or festival is best
is about as long as its potato-
pancake line.
It seems that the Northeast Fair
sort of kicks the season off,
which is why we chose it as this
week’s cover story (pgs. 14-15).
Not only does it boast some of
that aforementioned fair food, but
the Northeast Fair is also full of
live music, agricultural exhibits,
baking competitions and much
more.
And, to drive home how pop-
ular the fair’s baking competi-
tions really are, the Weekender’s
Betty Crocker-esque Staff Writer,
Stephanie DeBalko, volunteered
to make the lovely apple pie that
is featured on the cover. From
scratch, I will have you know.
Real apples and everything, as
opposed to canned apples like I
would have tried to pass off as
homemade.
As soon as she brought it in
last week for its moment in the
spotlight, General Manager Ra-
chel A. Pugh and I began sniff-
ing around.
“Did you do the photo shoot?”
Rachel casually called out from
her office a few times before we
actually did the big shoot.
Naturally, we made sure to
give her the first piece of what
was a very tasty pie — and the
last cover image that our Creative
Director Steve Husted will shoot
and design for us. You see, Steve
is leaving the Weekender this
week after six years with us. As
we wish him well in his new
endeavor, we welcome a familiar
face: Former intern Amanda
Dittmar, who is taking over as
graphic designer.
As always, thanks for reading
— sorry we didn’t save any pie
for you!
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
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HOUGH & PUFF
Julianne Hough on grinding on Tom Cruise, her ‘not a rock star’
boyfriend Ryan Seacrest and hitting the stripper pole.
inside J
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ROARING RETURN
A vacation re-energized
George Wesley - and his new CD. 32
TRAILBLAZERS
Third annual bike tour and festival
puts focus on the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail.
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COVER STORY
14-15
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN ... 7
SPEAK & SEE ... 13
CONCERTS ... 20-21
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT .... 22
AGENDA ... 28, 34, 35, 38, 39, 42
THEATER ... 31
CAR & BIKE ... 57
MUSIC
GEORGE WESLEY …16
ALBUM REVIEWS ... 18
CHARTS ... 18
ZIGGY MARLEY … 49
STAGE & SCREEN
STAGE ... 25
MOVIE REVIEW… 27
STARSTRUCK … 29
THE RALPHIE REPORT … 29
NOVEL APPROACH … 31
JULIANNE HOUGH … 41
FOOD, FUN & FASHION
NEWS OF THE WEIRD ... 10
GREEN PIECE … 25
PUZZLE … 28
LVHA BIKE TOUR … 32
STYLE FILES … 44
WORLD WIDE KNIT IN PUBLIC DAY …
45
RELAY FOR LIFE … 48
TELL US … 49
BITCH & BRAG … 51
SHOOT FOR THE STARS … 53
DISH … 55
TIPS FROM A BARBIE CHICK … 57
MISC.
TECH TALK …17
SORRY MOM & DAD … 42
MOTORHEAD … 43
SHOWUS SOME SKIN … 43
GET YOUR GAME ON … 52
HAPPY HOUR … 52
SIGN LANGUAGE … 56
ON THE COVER
DESIGN BY STEVE HUSTED & AMAN-
DA DITTMAR
PHOTO BY STEVE HUSTED
VOLUME 19 • ISSUE 31
index
June 13-19, 2012
this just in
By Weekender Staff
weekender@theweekender.com
GET IN AN UPROAR
The third annual Rockstar
Energy Drink Uproar Festival
will touch down Tuesday, Aug.
28 at 1:30 p.m. at Toyota Pavil-
ion at Montage Mountain (1000
Montage Mountain Road, Scran-
ton)
This year’s festival features
Shinedown, Godsmack, Staind,
Papa Roach and Adelitas Way
on the main stage and Deuce,
Fozzy, Redlight King, Mindset
Evolution, In This Moment,
Candlelight Red and a local
Battle Of The Bands winner on
the Ernie Ball and Jagermeister
stages.
Tickets are $32-$101.55 and go
on sale Friday, June 15 at 10 a.m.
via the box office or Ticketmas-
ter. Visit RockstarUPROAR.com
for more info.
NEWPLACE TO
LAY YOUR HEAD
SpringHill Suites Scranton
Wilkes-Barre (19 Radcliffe
Drive, Moosic) opened a 102-
suite hotel Sunday, June 10.
The hotel features separate
living, working and sleeping
spaces, iHome docking stations,
pullout sofa beds, a bathroom
accessed through sliding doors,
marble-top vanities and more.
For info or reservations, call
570.207.1212 or 888.287.9400 or
visit marriott.com/avpsh.
DEAD AS A DOORNAIL
Infect Scranton, a zombie-
themed convention, will take
over NEPA Friday, Sept. 21
through Sunday, Sept. 23 when
Riverside High School (300
Davis St., Taylor) is turned into
SC 232 (Survivor Camp 232).
Staged as a survivor camp after
a zombie outbreak, the event will
include vendors, a film festival
and question-and-answer and
panel discussions with notable
guests from hits like “Dawn of
the Dead” and “The Walking
Dead.” Among confirmed guests
are Madison Lintz, Addy Mill-
er, Jim Krut, Sharon Hill,
Leonard Lies, Gary Streiner,
Russ Streiner, Judy O’Dea,
Matt Mogk, Kirk Allmond and
GodDamn Zombie. There will
also be a screening of “Night of
the Living Dead.”
Tickets start at $20 and are
available in four levels: Ultimate
Survivor, VIP Survivor, Priority
Survivor and General Admission.
There will also be a Survivor
Zombie Challenge 5K Saturday,
Sept. 22, a Zombie Pub Crawl
on Friday, Sept. 21 and a Zombie
Brunch. For more info and a full
schedule, visit infectscranton-
.com.
TO MARKET, TO MARKET
Mohegan Sun Arena (255
Highland Park Blvd, Wilkes-
Barre Twp.) will host an outdoor
Summer Marketplace in its
parking lot Tuesdays from10
a.m.-5 p.m. beginning June 19
and running through Sept. 4.
The marketplace will be open
rain or shine and will feature
vendors offering locally grown
fresh produce, concessions,
baked goods, jewelry, collec-
tibles, novelty items and more.
Parking and admission are free.
For more info or a list of par-
ticipating vendors, visit mohe-
gansunarenapa.com; vendor
participation may vary per
week, and the arena is ac-
cepting applications for
vendors. For info, call
570.970.7600 or e-mail har-
hutm@mohegansunarena-
pa.com.
GET IN THE SWIM
OF THINGS
Camelback Mountain Resort
(1 Camelback Road, Tanners-
ville) will participate in the 2012
Guinness Book of World Re-
cords by hosting a free swim
lesson to the public Thursday,
June 14 at 10 a.m.
Last year’s event drew more
than 500 official World’s Largest
Swim Lesson host locations
around the globe representing 24
countries on five continents and
46 states.
ECRWFALL EDITION
KKPR Marketing & Public
Relations, the Milford-based
firm who brought NEPA its first
official restaurant week, will host
a fall installment of Electric City
Restaurant Week Friday, Oct.
5-Friday, Oct. 19.
Restaurants who would like to
get involved can visit electricci-
tyrw.com or visit its Facebook
and Twitter sites to learn more.
To sign up, call 570.296.2333 or
e-mail Jody Welsh at Jo-
dy@kkmpr.com.
JVWGOES TO ‘CAMP’
Local filmmaker Joe Van Wie
has announced the launch of a
Kickstarter campaign to fund
the making of the film “Camp
St. Zombie.”
A horror/comedy hybrid, the
movie will tell the story of St.
Lazarus, a camp for wayward
children run by the Catholic
Church. The kids begin mutating
into flesh-hungry zombies thanks
to a barrel of toxic waste dumped
into the lake by a duo of inept
military soldiers and a priest and
the camp counselors must defend
themselves against them.
Van Wie, who will direct the
movie, is the CEO and principal
owner of local advertising agen-
cy and production house JVW
Inc. and was an executive pro-
ducer on the locally shot inde-
pendent film “Forged,” which
won top prizes at the HBO In-
ternational Latino Film Festiv-
al and the Providence, R.I.,
Film Festival.
For more info, visit jvwinc.net
or kickstarter.com/projects/jvw/
camp-st-zombie-0.
ROCNROL HITS RECORD
Scranton hip-hop artist DJ
RocnRol will film a video for
the single “Passion,” featuring
Amber Crystal, from his forth-
coming album “Old School.”
The video will be filmed in and
around Scranton starting Sunday,
June 17 at the creek beneath the
Bangor Heights housing projects.
The video will be filmed by
Joe Adcroft and The State Of
The Art Productions and is
being submitted for airplay on all
major music channels. The pro-
duction crew is seeking extras
and crew members.
“Old School” is scheduled for
release in August. W
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570-451-0210
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news of the weird
By Chuck Shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
EVEN MASS MURDERERS
NEED FRIENDS
Norway is home to perhaps the
most inmate-friendly prison in
the world (as mentioned previ-
ously in “News of the Weird”),
but the correctional system has
an imminent crisis, as Anders
Behring Breivik (the confessed
killer of 77 people last year) is
nearing formal conviction and
sentencing. Officials fear the
sociopathic Breivik will try to
kill inmates to add to his toll, yet
Norwegian law forbids solitary
confinement as cruel. Conse-
quently, according to a May
report by Norway’s Verdens
Gang newspaper, the officials
have begun a search to select,
hire and train appropriate
“friends” to hang out with Brei-
vik behind bars to win his trust
and prevent further mayhem.
Among Breivik’s favorite recre-
ational distractions: Chess and
hockey.
CULTURAL DIVERSITY
-- Collections of comically
poor translations are legion, but
the Beijing municipal govern-
ment, in sympathy with English-
speaking restaurant-goers, pub-
lished a helpful guidebook re-
cently of what the restaurateurs
were trying, though inartfully, to
say. In an April interview with
the authors, NBC News learned
the contents of “Hand Shredded
A$$ Meat” (sic) (merely donkey
meat) and other baffling English
descriptions (all taken from ac-
tual menus), such as “Cowboy
Leg,” “Red-Burned Lion Head,”
“Blow-up Flatfish With No Re-
sult” and the very unhelpful
“Tofu Made by Woman With
Freckles” and “Strange Flavor
Noodles.”
-- Competitive facial-hair-
growers are revered in some
countries, with Pakistan and
India featured in recent reports.
Pakistani Amir Muhammad
Afridi, 42, whose handlebar lip
hair extends in an arc almost to
the top of his head, told reporters
he had to move from his rural
home to the more secular Pesha-
war because of threats that his
pride and joy was un-Islamic.
And the Guinness Book record-
holder, Ram Singh Chauhan, 54,
of India, offered grooming tips in
an interview with BBC News,
revealing that he keeps his 14-
foot-long moustache conditioned
by cleaning and combing it for
an hour each day (treated with
coconut-based hair oil) and la-
mented that he must wind it
around his neck to keep it from
interfering with his daily activ-
ities.
WAIT — THAT’S ILLEGAL?
(1) In Kent, Washington, in
May, Yong Hyun Kim, 21, was
charged with assault at a movie
house. Annoyed by a group of
kids in the row behind him who
were constantly talking, laughing
and throwing popcorn during
“Titanic,” Yong slapped the near-
est boy, bloodying his nose and
knocking out a tooth. (2) In Pir-
masens, Germany, in May, a
61-year-old woman was fined the
equivalent of almost $1,000 for
assault. Frustrated by telemarke-
ters’ constantly cold-calling her,
she took it out on one by blowing
a whistle into the telephone,
allegedly causing permanent
damage to the telemarketer’s
hearing.
CHUTZPAH!
-- Ms. Stormy Moody was
arrested and charged with aggra-
vated burglary in Henderson
County, Tenn., in May after her
next-door neighbor returned from
a trip and discovered that quite a
few items (from the petty to the
more expensive) were missing
from the home. For some reason,
Moody felt secure enough to be
wearing some of the clothing as
she chatted sympathetically with
the victim about the missing
items.
-- Most public officials caught
“sexting” immediately turn re-
morseful, but not Michigan ap-
peals court judge Wade McCree
III. In April, when the husband
of a female bailiff in McCree’s
court saw that the judge had sent
the bailiff a shirtless photo of
himself, McCree told a curious
reporter for Detroit’s WJBK-TV,
“Hot dog, yep, that’s me.” “I’ve
got no shame in my game.” “I’m
in no more clothes than I’ll be at
the Y this afternoon when I swim
my mile.” The still-irate husband
said he would pursue a judicial
commission complaint against
McCree.
PEOPLE DIFFERENT
FROMUS
(1) Calvin Hill, 54, was arrest-
ed in Greenwood, S.C., in May
after allegedly stabbing a 41-
year-old man with whom he was
arguing in the back seat of a car.
The police report stated that the
men were arguing “about who
can have the most sex.” (2)
WJBK-TV reported in June that
two men in the Brightmoor
neighborhood of Detroit wound
up in a gunfight over which one
made Kool-Aid better. (Neither
man was hit, but two bystanders
were reportedly wounded.)
RECURRING THEMES
In Stockholm, N.Y., in May, a
24-year-old man became the
most recent to have a friend
shoot him just because the man
wanted to know what it felt like
to get shot. The friend, Shawn
Mossow, 25, relented, finally, and
fired a .22-caliber rifle shot into
the man’s leg, but the man is
expected to make a full recovery.
CORRECTION
Contrary to “News of the
Weird” of Wednesday, May 23,
prominent “breatharian” Ellen
Greve is not dead, which clearly
means that she has been cheating
on the “sun and air only” diet
that she promoted during the
1990s. In reading a news story, I
must have confused Greve with
one of her followers (who appar-
ently faithfully observed the
diet). W
Try News of the Weird Pro
Edition at
NewsoftheWeird.blogspot.com.
Two veteran Church of England vicars were in the
news in May for their unique approaches. Rev. An-
dy Kelso left the church after 25 years to start an
Elvis Presley Gospel Tribute act as “Elvis Prayer-
sley.” Said Kelso, “I felt God say to me very strong-
ly, ‘Take Elvis to the church.’” And Rev. Nick Da-
vies of Cheltenham, England, promises to continue
breathing fire part-way through his sermons (to
mark Pentecost, in which the Holy Spirit descends
on Jesus’ disciples, appearing as “tongues of
flame”).
EX OTIC
LIN G ERIE
M R.
FA SH ION S
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1255 Sans Souci Highway
Wilkes-Barre, PA
(570) 8 29 -2224
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E s t. 1974
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WHEN YOU NEED MORE THAN
JUST GLASS ... Pipes & Smoking
Accessories
Incense, Posters, Stickers,
Tye Dyes, Detoxifiers
Wiccan Supplies
7
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Grave 74
Tattoo
400 Middle
Road
570-239-3002
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Ono’s Bar & Grill
236 Zerby Ave.
Kingston, PA 283-2511
SUNDAY & WEDNESDAY
8PM-10PM
$1.00 MUGS
KARAOKE
EVERY FRIDAY &
SATURDAY 9PM
35 E. South St. • Wilkes-Barre
(570) 820-7172 • Open Mon.-Fri. 10 am - 6 pm
Find us on
Facebook
CALL CALL
JOHN TO JOHN TO
ADVERTISE ADVERTISE
831.7349 831.7349
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WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
NEPA BEER
PONG
Check us out on menusnepa.com for food specials and Facebook for food and drink specials
Konefal’s is now open for breakfast midnight-4am...meet us there
BEER PONG
RR NN
Pub & Grub
OPEN FOR LUNCH AT NOON
$4 BURGERS ALL DAY & $2 FRIES
$3 BOMBS AND $3 WELL MIXERS 10-12
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
$4 & $8 PITCHERS,
$2 FIREWATERS,
$2 AMERICAN HONEY
SHOTS, 9-11PM
$4 BURGERS &
$5 BONELESS BITES
$2 FIREWATERS
$4 & $8 PITCHERS &
$3 BOMBS 9-11
$6 LARGE PIES (IHO)
SUNDAY
Mon-Wed 3-2am • Thu-Fri 11-2am • Sat 3-2am • Sun Noon-2am• 570-779-1800 • Corner of State and Nesbitt, Larksville
Call Mark C. Krasavage Plumbing for all of your plumbing needs • 570-287-1273
Konefal’s is now open for breakfast midnight-4am Konefal’s is now open for breakfast mi iddniiighht-4am
Pub & Grub
avagee Ca a C a age g
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YOU BELONG HERE!
$8 PITCHERS 8-12
$6 PIZZAS (IHO)
$1.50 PINTS AND
$1 DRAFTS ALL DAY
40¢ WINGS (IHO)
$2 COORS LIGHT & MILLER LITE
ALUMINUM BOTTLES
SOFTBALL SUNDAYS
BREAKDOWN JIMMY
BEER PONG
10:30 PM
PAYOUT DEPENDING ON # OF TEAMS
$10 PER TEAM INCLUDES PIZZA AND PITCHER OF BEER
$5 FOR PLAYERS UNDER 18
(BEER NOT INCLUDED FOR THOSE UNDER 21)
PLAYING ALL THE OLD SCHOOL FAVORITES
2ND ANNUAL BEER PONG
TOURNAMENT FOR LEUKEMIA
DJ BIG RIG
MARK BAYNOCK IS MOVING TO
SAN FRANCISCO SO HE CAN WAIVE
HIS RAINBOW FLAG
BEER PONG • ITS JUST PUTTING A
BALL IN A CUP • FUN FOR EVERYONE
ALL AGES ARE WELCOME!
TWISTED TUESDAYS
FREE POOL &
FREE JUKEBOX
30¢ WINGS $2 LOOPY BOMBS
$2 TWISTED TEAS
$1 CANS 9-11 P.M.
BOOM!!!
$4 & $8 PITCHERS
$3 BOMBS
$2 SHOTS OF FIREWATER
& AMERICAN HONEY 9-11P.M.
20¢ CLAMS
NEPA BEER
PONG
DJ FRANKIE 14
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64 RIDGWAY DRIVE, DALLAS, PA. ª ENJOY YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE WITH B.Y.O.B.
BACK YARD BARBECUE
June 16 | 5 - 8 p.m. | $17.95
(plus tax & gratuity)
Kick off summer with barbecue favorites paired with live music and open air dining. This buffet
includes salads, barbecue chicken and spare ribs, corn on the cob, cherry cobbler and more!
Reservations are required.
WEEKLY DINNER SPECIALS
Wednesday: Wing Night | Thursday: Chef’s Pasta Special
Friday: Seafood Night | Saturday: Barbecue Night
Reservations Requested: 675-1134, ext. 102
Check www.iremclubhouse.com for full menu details.
Dining Exprience
The Ultimate Back Mountain
The Irem Clubhouse Restaurant & Pub blends modern elegance, premier cuisine and exemplary service. With menu items starting
at only $7.95, enjoy lunch and dinner Wednesday - Saturday and brunch Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
CLUBHOUSE
yogastudio,wyoming • www.theyogastudiowyomingpa.net
“Yoga has helped my balance and fexibility and
helped clear my mind of daily stress”
- Kerry, 34
Marilyn Giambra, Owner/Instructor
located at
210 Wyoming Ave.
Wyoming
(2 Doors Down From
The Post Office)
301-7544
We offer Hatha Yoga classes on
Monday and Thursday at 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday and Saturday at 10:30 a.m.
Monday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m.
Come Rejuvenate Your
Body, Mind and Spirit
$
10
00
per class,
$
8
00
sr. cit.
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speak and see
POETIC
Anthology Books (515 Center
St., Scranton, above Outrageous,
570.341.1443, scrantholo-
gy@gmail.com) All events free,
unless otherwise noted.
❏ Book Groups
• Scranton Interplanetary Literary
Agency, a classic science fiction
discussion group: 2nd Tues., 6:30
p.m.
❏ Writing Groups
• Open writers group: Sat., noon led
by KK Gordon and Leslee Clapp.
Bring piece of original writing to
discuss and critique.
Arts Seen Gallery (21 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre)
• Third Friday/Poet Luciana Celes-
tine: June 15, 8 p.m. Open reading of
poetry and prose follows. Refresh-
ments.
Barnes & Noble Booksellers
(Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre,
570.829.4210)
❏ Signings:
• Former Governor Ed Rendell,
author of “A Nation of Wusses:” June
15, 7 p.m.
• Former Yankee Jim Leyritz, author
of “Catching Heat:” June 23, noon.
❏ Special events:
• Lego Building Event: June 24, 1
p.m. Learning, hands-on. Sign-up
recommended. Free.
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏ Events/Book Clubs:
• Open Mic Night: last Tues. of every
month, 6:30 p.m.
• Writer’s Workgroup: Wyoming
Valley Wordsmiths: first/third Tues.
monthly, 7 p.m.
❏ Children’s Events:
• Weekly Sat. morning story time, 11
a.m.-noon.
Bernie Bernwall Book Sign-
ing June 21, 7-9 p.m., Holiday Inn
Express and Suites (1265 Commerce
Blvd., Dickson City). Info:
888.361.9473, jim@tatepublishing.com
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
• Writers Group: Thurs., 7-8:30 p.m.
18+. Celebrates all types of writing
styles, formats. Join anytime. Free.
Call to register.
Osterhout Library (71 S. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.821.1959)
• Socrates Cafe Discussion Group:
June 14, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Call to
register.
❏Summer Reading Club for Adults:
• “The Hunger Games” Book Dis-
cussion: June 21, 6:30 p.m. All ages.
Copies available for $2, Information
Services Desk. Light refreshments.
Call to register.
• “50 Shades of Grey” Discussion:
June 26, 6:30 p.m. Light refresh-
ments. Adults only. Free. Call to
register.
Pages & Places
❏ Cafe Programs (Platform Lounge
at Trax in Radisson Lackawanna
Station Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton. Happy hour 6 p.m., pro-
grams 7 p.m.)
• The Gathering Presents Trebbe
Johnson: June 14. Author of “The
World Is a Waiting Lover: Desire and
the Quest for the Beloved” and
director of “Vision Arrow.”
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565)
• Crochet Club: Tues. 10 a.m.-noon,
Thurs. 6-7:45 p.m., 12+, registration
required. Participants bring their
own crochet hook, yarn. Call, stop to
register.
• Basic Computer Class for Adults:
Mon., 10:30 a.m. Call to register.
• The Friends Meetings: 4th Thurs.
of month, 6:30 p.m. New members
always welcome.
• Toddler and Preschool Story Time:
Call to register.
• Adult Summer Reading: Between
the Covers: Adult fiction, non-fiction.
Private book sale at end of summer.
• Book Sale: June 14, 2-6 p.m.; June
16, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
• Teen Summer Reading: Own the
Night: Teens entering grades 6-12.
Registration required, through June
16, call or e-mail pittstonlibrary@ya-
hoo.com. 8-week program, June 21,
28; July 5, 12, 19, 26; Aug. 2, 9, 2 p.m.
• Adult Baked Goods Book Club:
June 18, 6 p.m. “The Particular Sad-
ness of Lemon Cake” by Aimee
Bender.
• Summer Reading Theme “Dream
Big, Read:” June 18-Aug. 13. Ages 18
months-adult. Programs will include
reading, science, crafts, family movie
nights, prizes, more.
STACKS Writing Group Starts
July 10. 2nd/4th Tues. every month, 6
p.m., The Banshee, (320 Penn Ave.,
Scranton). Info: stackswriting-
group@gmail.com
Susquehanna County His-
torical Society and Free
Library Association
• Library Lottery 2012: $100 ticket.
Each ticket has 50 chances. Prizes
$500-$50,000. Ticket application at
susqcolibrary.org or county libraries.
Drawing July 21. Call 570.278.1881 for
info.
West Pittston Library (200
Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
• Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m.
Free. Informal discussion of member-
selected books.
• Weekly story time for children:
Fri., 1 p.m. Free.
VISUAL
“67 Women, 67 Counties:
Facing Breast Cancer in
Pennsylvania” Traveling
Photo Exhibit: Opening recep-
tion, June 14, 6 p.m., Hazleton Health
& Wellness Center. To RSVP, call
800.377.8828 ext. 304.
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m.
• Life Drawing sessions: every Mon.,
7-9 p.m. Contact ted@tedmichalow-
ski.com for info.
• Drawing Socials: Sun., 6-9 p.m. $5
GA, $2 student.
• Kevin Dartt & Elisa Freda: Cele-
brate Works: through June 29.
• Annual Student Art Exhibition and
Reception hosted by Virginia P.
Sosik: June 30, 6-8 p.m. Original
artwork. Free admission.
Artspace Gallery (221 Center St.,
Bloomsburg, 570.784.0737)
Gallery Hours: Thurs.-Sat., noon-8
p.m., Sun., noon-5 p.m., or by ap-
pointment.
• “Vivid Interpretations:” through
July 8. Watercolors by Joan Trusty
Lentczner, oils by Gail Zambor. Info:
artspace-bloomsburg.com
ArtWorks Gallery (502 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton. 570.207.1815,
artworksnepa.com)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sat., noon-3 p.m., or by appointment.
• William Teitsworth and William
Tersteeg: through June 29.
The Butternut Gallery &
Second Story Books (204
Church St, 2nd Floor, Montrose)
Gallery hours: Wed.-Sat., 11a.m.-5
p.m., Sun., 12 p.m.-4 p.m.
• “Llama, Llama, Duck & Clay:”
June 16-July 8. Opening reception
June 16, 6-8 p.m. Call 570.278.4011
for info.
Camerawork Gallery (Down-
stairs in the Marquis Gallery, Laundry
Building, 515 Center St., Scranton,
570.510.5028. www.camerawork-
gallery.org, rross233@aol.com) Gal-
lery hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “The Musicians:” through June 30.
Collection of past and present musi-
cians.
Gallery at the Pocono Com-
munity Theater (88 S. Courtland
St., East Stroudsburg, 570.421.3456.
poconocommunitytheater.org)
• “Wild About Flowers: through June
17. Front gallery, Andrea Robbins-
Rimberg.
• “Vacation Time:” through June 17.
Back gallery, Penny Ross.
• “Childhood … Different Things To
Different Children:” June 17-Aug. 19.
Front gallery. Photographer Theo
Solomon of Monroe County.
• “Friends and Lovers:” June 17-Aug.
19. Back gallery. Photographer Don
Manza.
Mahady Gallery (Marywood
University, 570.348.6211 x 2428, mary-
wood.edu/galleries.)
Summer hours: Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3
p.m.
• Graduate Exhibition: through June
15. John Kolbek, Kelly Ufkin, Sarrah F.
Dibble, Niko J. Kallianiotis, Georgia
Test.
Marquis Art & Frame (122 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0518)
Gallery hours Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “In the Details”-works by Erika
Baez, Omar Rodriguez Jr. & Allison
Maslow: through July 7.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton,
www.newvisionstudio.com,
570.878.3970)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6 p.m.
and by appointment.
• Sight Specific Exhibit: through
June 16. Photography, paintings,
carved stone bowls. Info: newvisions-
studio@gmail.com
Pauly Friedman Art Gallery
(Misericordia University,
570.674.6250, misericordia.edu/art)
Gallery Hours: Mon. closed, Tue.-
Thurs. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-5
p.m., Sat.-Sun. 1-5 p.m.
• “The Impact and History of Nurs-
ing Education in Luzerne County,
1887-2012:” through June 29.
Schulman Gallery (2nd floor of
LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S. Pros-
pect St., Nanticoke, www.luzerne.edu/
schulmangallery, 570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
• Annual Student Show: through
June 28. Graphics, paintings, photog-
raphy, computer graphics, portfolios.
Something Special (23 W.
Walnut St., Kingston, 570.288.8386)
Open Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat.,
7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
• Watercolor and More: through July
6. Watercolor, graphic, acrylic, pho-
tography by John Clark.
Sordoni Art Gallery at
Wilkes University (150 S. River
St., Stark Learning Center,
570.408.4325)
Summer hours: Sat., 11 a.m.-4 p.m.;
Sun., noon-4 p.m.; Mon-Thurs. by
appointment only
• “Alumni and Community: Selec-
tions from the Sordoni Art Gallery
Permanent Collection:” June 16-Aug.
5.
STAR Gallery at the Mall at
Steamtown (570.969.2537/
343.3048)
• An Afternoon of Music, Poetry and
Fine Arts: June 30, 3:30 p.m. “In-
flated Ear Workshop Ensemble.” Fine
arts aficionados, bring sketch books
and art supplies. Mall will provide
unlimited sitting space in front of
gallery.
Widmann Gallery (Located in
King’s College’s Sheehy-Farmer
Campus Center between North Fran-
klin and North Main Streets, Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5900, ext. 5328)
Gallery hours: Mon. through Fri. 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free and open to
the public.
• “Passion,” photography by Teri
Moore: through Aug. 3. Artist dis-
cussion June 15, 6-8 p.m. W
-- compiled by Alexa Cholewa,
Weekender Intern
Send your listings to:
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market Street
Wilkes-Barre PA18703 or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline for
publication is Mondays at 2 p.m.
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More bang
for your buck
Take in the sights and sounds of the
Northeast Fair for one low price
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
N
ortheastern
Pennsylvania
seems to have
cornered the
market on bazaars and
festivals. Maybe it’s
because of our melting
pot of heritages or the
tight-knit communities,
but every year around this
time, the air becomes thick
with the scent of sweet and
savory fried foods, and the
days stretch into nights
filled with rides, games
and even more food.
And the rulers of those
events are the fairs. There
are only 110 listed this
year by the Pennsylvania
State Association of
County Fairs (PSACF),
and one of them is the
Northeast Fair. That local
event has a story steeped
in nostalgia, starting out
in 1967 as the Pittston
Twp. Carnival run by the
Pittston Twp. Volunteer
Fire Department.
“I think people,
especially in the Pittston
area, just have always
gone to the carnival in the
summertime,” said Donna
B. Kuzminski, marketing/
webmaster for the fair.
“The people in Pittston,
they are community, and
they have supported the
fire department for many
years, and I think it just
continues.”
The Northeast Fair will
run Tuesday, June 19
through Sunday, June 24
in Pittston Twp. and will
offer rides, live music,
motorsports competitions,
exhibits, vendors and a
number of contests.
Always a six-day
event, the original carnival
was held next to the main
fire station on Bryden
Street, which still operates
today. The fair has been
held at its current location
next to a second fire
station since 2001.
“People just kept
coming,” said Joseph
R. Aliciene, president
of the fair and member
of the fire department,
about the growth of
the event. “We had
entertainment when
people didn’t have
entertainment, and
it sort of drew
some people in,
and we had rides
and we had games
... So we were
just like a mini-
fair (in the early
stages).”
The operators of
the fair applied for
state-fair status in 2002
and changed the name to
the Northeast Fair. After
a three-year probation
period, in 2005 it officially
became a state fair
under the auspices of the
Pennsylvania Department
of Agriculture.
“There are state fairs in
Pennsylvania, (but) no one
state fair,” Aliciene said.
FRIENDLY
COMPETITION
W
hen the
Northeast Fair
was officially
recognized by the state
of Pennsylvania, the
opportunity presented
itself to host competitions
like the Fair Queen
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contest and the PABlue
Ribbon Apple Pie contest.
In those and a number
of other contests, the
winners advance to the
Pennsylvania State Farm
Show Competition.
“As a fair, you have
to assign judges that
are authorized by the
agriculture department,”
Aliciene said, noting that
most, if not all, of the
judges are from out of the
area. “So you pick from
that list. They’re assigned
in the various categories
— they’re called
departments by the fair
— so in each department,
there are judges that are
authorized.”
Winners of most contests
also receive a nominal
prize, and that’s where
it’s beneficial to have the
state’s help.
“The state comes
in and helps with
reimbursements, especially
in the contest side of it,”
Aliciene explained. “You
pay it out first, and then
the state reimburses the
fair for a portion of it.”
Every day of the fair
also offers live music,
something that’s been an
integral part of the event
even before it became
the Northeast Fair. And
entry to the shows, which
will feature Cabinet,
Start Making Sense, Jam
Stampede, the cast of
“Beatlemania” and Shawn
Klush, is included in the
admission price. That’s
also true for just about
everything else.
“That is such a good
value, even at $9, because
they get all the rides for
free,” said Kuzminski,
noting that tickets can also
be purchased in advance
at a discount. “They get
to see all the exhibits and
all the entertainment and
the motorshows and the
concerts.”
Ryan O’Malley, who has
been in charge of the stage
and booking since 2004,
shared that there will
also be an original music
showcase.
“The bands do compete
for money prizes, so it’s
technically a battle of the
bands,” he said. “But I try
to view it as giving these
bands a chance to get their
music heard.”
FAIRLY INVOLVED
T
he Northeast Fair
is situated between
Wilkes-Barre and
Scranton and gets about
37,000 visitors, according
to Aliciene.
“It is probably one of
the better fairgrounds in
our local area,” he added.
“It’s not muddy, all the
midways are paved … We
could expand at any part
of the grounds and add an
electric service, which is a
phenomenal thing for even
the existing fairs, because
they have to bring PPL,
and we don’t.”
But all of that is due
to the effort of the fair’s
operators.
“The only reason why it
is remaining a success is
because of the people that
stay involved,” Aliciene
said. “Alot of our people
have been there for 40
years, and that’s what
makes it go. Everybody
says, ‘Well, don’t quit
this year, quit next year,’
and that’s basically what
happens with it.”
Kuzminski shared that
she’s always been involved
in community events, so
staying active with the fair
is a no-brainer.
“I’m not sacrificing
much at all, but I’m at
least getting something
done for the community,”
she stated.
And for O’Malley, it
comes back to the notion
of support.
“It’s just cool bringing
in these bands and seeing
people come out and
support them, that’s the
biggest thing for me,” he
said.
After being involved
since its inception,
Aliciene is ready to pass
the torch to someone
who’s willing and able.
“You know, it’s like
having a baby, raising
it up,” Aliciene shared.
“You’d hate like hell to
see it go down the tubes
after we got to this point,
so you want it to continue.
This could be a lifetime
situation — it’s not only
lifetime, as long as you
comply with all the rules
and regulations, you’re a
fair forever.” W
At left and above, scenes from past years at the Northeast Fair.
Northeast Fair:
June 19-24,
20 Freeport Road, Grimes
Industrial Park, Pittston Twp.
$9, $7/June 23-24. Food,
music, rides, games.
Info:
570.654.2503,
northeastfair.com
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2324 SANS SOUCI
PARKWAY, HANOVER TWP.
WE HAVE ENTERTAINMENT
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$2.75 $2.75
PINNACLE PINNACLE
MIXERS MIXERS
10-12 10-12
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LIGHT LIGHT
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SISTER
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ESTHER
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and and
1/2 WAY TO 1/2 WAY TO
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LIGHT LIGHT
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CLAM NIGHT!
DJ K MAK
TEDDY YOUNG
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ALSO ON YOUR AM DIAL:
730 AM
G
eorge Wesley is a man
at ease. As the local
reggae master prepares
to release his 10th album,
“Old Lion,” he’s still got the
twinkle in his eye of a
young musician, yet the wis-
dom of one that has record-
ed a fine body of work.
Wesley says the new al-
bum, his first in four years,
was partly inspired by a
three-month trip to Florida.
While there, he says he and
his girlfriend, Annette Mi-
raglia, who also plays per-
cussion, felt reenergized
about music.
“I’ve been thinking about
doing it for a while, and
trying to get the project to-
gether,” says Wesley. “Being
down there, everything start-
ed manifesting itself. Gigs
started happening, and the
whole vibe was very in-
spiring. We were in a differ-
ent place, and people were
hearing the music in a whole
different light.”
Wesley’s new CD was re-
corded at SI Studios in Old
Forge. Some tracks are re-
workings of old favorites,
some were written prior to
his visit to Florida, while
others came as a result of
the trip. Wesley said he
wrote the whole album using
loops, and that as soon as he
returned to NEPA, he hit the
studio.
Wesley describes “Old
Lion,” the autobiographical
title track, as “my journey.”
And though he’s best known
as a reggae artist, he has
always stressed that he also
has roots in rock ’n’ roll and
blues. With the release of
“Old Lion,” however, he
seems to be fully embracing
his love for reggae and his
association with it.
“As much as I love every-
thing else, the bottom line is
reggae has been very good
to me,” he says. “And why
fight it? I love all kinds of
music, and the beautiful
thing about reggae is because
it’s such a new form of mu-
sic, I could pretty much use
all of my influences. I can’t
deny that I’m indentified
with it, and if I’m going to
be identified with it, I may
as well do my best to really
promote myself that way and
use it as a vehicle for what
I’ve got to say.”
In addition to a celebration
of reggae, the album also
serves a celebration of Wes-
ley’s spirituality.
“I also have to look at my
own mortality,” he says.
“While I was in Florida, I
became a great-grandfather.
Wow. It really made me look
at everything differently, and
really the whole idea of the
album, I wanted to put it
together for the youth.”
With “Old Lion,” Wesley,
58, sounds as young as ever.
The songs are gripping, the
production is excellent, and
he sings with passion. He
says that “the Almighty and
the beauty of creation” con-
tinue to inspire his songs.
“I just want to be here for
upliftment,” he says. “It’s a
tough life. Life can be so
tough, you forget about the
simple joys.”
Wesley will hold a CD-
release party with a full
band Friday, June 15 at the
River Street Jazz Cafe in
Plains Twp. There will also
be a CD-release performance
on Tuesday, June 19 at the
Gallery of Sound on Mundy
Street in Wilkes-Barre. Other
upcoming shows include
June 16-17 at the Split Rock
Wine Festival, June 22 at
RiverFest and July 18 at the
Weekender/Mountaingrown
Original Music Series.
Wesley says he’s not only
proud of “Old Lion,” but
with a catalog of original
material dating back to 1986,
he’s also proud that he can
play so many of his own
songs at his live shows.
“It’s nice, as an artist, to
be able to go out and do my
own thing, and still be able
to play tribute to the people
that have influenced me.” W
George Wesley “Old Lion”
CD-release party, Fri., June 15,
10 p.m., River Street Jazz Cafe
(667 N. River St., Plains Twp.)
Info: georgewesley.com
George Wesley’s new album, ’Old Lion,’ is his first in
four years.
Wesley
returns with
'Old Lion'
By Alan K. Stout
Weekender Correspondent
“As much as I love
everything else, the
bottom line is reg-
gae has been very
good to me.”
George Wesley
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tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
W
ell, Apple fans are again
in for a treat. At the
Worldwide Developers
Conference in San Francisco, the
company announced Monday
another new slew of Apple prod-
ucts and upgrades. Among them,
a new version of the OS X oper-
ating system, this one codenamed
Mountain Lion, along with a new
MacBook Pro and an update for
the MacBook Air, as well as
upgrades to the iPad, iPhone and
iPod in the form of a new mobile
operating system, iOS 6.
So what’s in the pipeline?
Mountain Lion, the new version
of Apple’s OS X operating sys-
tem, will offer better integration
with iCloud and will be a bit
closer, in terms of user experi-
ence, to Apple mobile devices.
Microsoft has taken strong steps
in this direction as well, so it will
be interesting to see how that
move plays out.
Apple also announced an up-
date for the MacBook Air, Ap-
ple’s extremely thin laptop, with
beefed-up graphics cards and
expanded solid state storage
space for improved performance.
The new Air will cost between
$1,000 and $1,100, which is rea-
sonable given all of the tech-
nology packed into the case.
Also touted was a major up-
date for the MacBook Pro, which
an Apple marketing official
touted as “the most amazing
computer we have ever made.”
The Pro has been thinned
down to be quite a bit closer to
the Air, and it will feature an
improved high-pixel-density
display.
The new Pro comes in two
flavors, one with a 13-inch dis-
play and one with a 15-inch dis-
play. The 13-inch Pro will cost
between $1,200 and $1,500, and
the 15-inch Pro will range be-
tween $1,800 and $2,200.
Finally, iOS 6 has been an-
nounced, reportedly toting more
than 200 new features, including
upgrades to Siri that will allow
“her” to offer detailed sports
information, movie show times
and reviews and app-launching
capabilities. Additionally, Siri
will be available on iPad devices
running iOS 6.
Improved Facebook and auto-
motive integrations are coming,
as well as improvements to Mo-
bile Safari and a new Passbook
app that essentially acts as a
mobile wallet, storing customer
loyalty cards and the like.
Most importantly, in its contin-
uing scuffle with Google, Apple
has dropped Google Maps, re-
placing it with a new Apple-
derived “Maps” app that offers
traffic integration, turn-by-turn
navigation and more. W
Nick DeLorenzo is director of
interactive and new media for
The Times Leader. E-mail him
atndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
Apple moves forward
Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide
marketing, talks about new features to the company’s
laptops during the Developers Conference in San
Francisco, Monday, June 11.
P
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It’s tempting to want to hate
John Mayer. With his new pseu-
do-troubadour image and the
fact that he hasn’t seemed to
use his natural talents for any-
thing but charming the pants off
of some celebrities for the past
three years, what’s to like?
But just when you’ve decided
it’s a lost cause, that nothing
great is going to come
from the voice and strings
that made women swoon at
the idea of being a verita-
ble wonderland, the lotha-
rio comes riding back to
charm with a perfectly
executed new album,
“Born and Raised.”
Perfect is a strong word
but isn’t misplaced here; Mayer
is at his best with a lyrically
creative, softly orchestrated
record filled with delicate orga-
nic guitar.
To be fair, the record is lack-
ing in Mayer’s signature soul-
shaking solos, but songs like
“Something Like Olivia” and
“Love Is A Verb” remind us that
he’s still a capable musician.
And the generational “Speak For
Me” and uniquely constructed
“Walt Grace’s Submarine Test,
January 1967” prove that Mayer
is ready to redefine himself in
terms of his musical persona.
The more emotive side of
Mayer is fully present on “Born
and Raised,” but it’s most prom-
inent on songs like “Queen of
California” and “A Face To Call
Home,” and his heartfelt deliv-
ery on both tracks evens out the
album’s laid-back atmosphere.
Hopefully “Born and Raised”
is a progression, but not a per-
manent departure from some of
Mayer’s previous work. But
maybe this is who the
guitar player is now —
the troubadour look isn’t
an act, it’s who he’s be-
come. This album is solid
evidence for that argu-
ment.
-- Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
RATING:
W W W W W
John Mayer
“Born and Raised”
ALBUM REVIEWS
Mayer's 'Born' identity
Mayer is at his best with
a lyrically creative, softly
orchestrated record filled
with delicate organic guitar.
charts
8. Karmin: “Brokenhearted”
7. Gotye/Kimbra: “Somebody
That I Used to Know”
6. The Wanted: “Glad You
Came”
5. Flo Rida/Sia: “Wild Ones”
4. One Direction: “What Makes
You Beautiful”
3. Nicki Minaj: “Starships”
2. Katy Perry: “Part of Me”
1. fun./Janelle Monae: “We Are
Young”
Top at 8 with Ralphie Aversa
1. Rudimental/John Newman: “Feel
The Love”
2. fun./Janelle Monae: “We Are
Young”
3. Loreen: “Euphoria”
4. Lawson: “When She Was Mine”
5. Carly Rae Jepsen: “Call Me
Maybe”
6. Rihanna: “Where Have You Been”
7. Alex Clare: “Too Close”
8. Rita Ora/Tinie Tempah: “R.I.P.”
9. Train: “Drive By”
10. The Wanted: “Chasing The Sun”
Billboard Top U.K. Songs
One thing that can be said for New
York-based death-metal band Dr. Acula is
that it never seems to lack creativity. From
its well thought-out song titles, one-of-a-
kind instrumentals and piercing lyrics,
this resourceful band seems to be con-
stantly evolving its music and is set to
release “Nation” Tuesday, June 19 via
Victory Records.
Since forming in 2005, Dr. Acula —
vocalists Tyler Guida and Casey Carrano,
drummer Jesse Ciappa, bassist Kevin
Graffeo and guitarists Ricky Ostolaza and
Bill Graffeo — has undergone tons of
lineup changes. However, the current
six-piece act seems as though it has final-
ly gotten it right.
This release begins with the short spo-
ken intro “Be Careful What You Wish
For” before launching into an all-out
assault with “Heavy Handed.” Heavy is
really an understatement. From this track
on out, “Nation” is definitely not for
anyone who is not a fan of death metal.
The title track and “Thinner” are two of
the album’s most hostile.
Despite the overall aggressive nature of
this band’s music, it also begins many of
its songs with instrumentals that then lead
into metal, making for an interesting
dynamic on nearly every track. Having
two vocalists also adds a very distinct
force to Dr. Acula’s music. The back-and-
forth between Guida and Carrano is in-
tense on the short and unique “Robot
People from Hell.”
Before you even get to the band’s music
on “Nation,” its ingenuity is evident in the
titles of each track. Luckily, the band’s
music is equally as interesting on this one.
-- Lisa Schaeffer
Weekender Correspondent
Dr. Acula
“Nation”
Rating: W W1/2
Dr. Acula
prescribes
hostility
When a member of a band releases a
solo album, it’s usually so their voice
can be heard, something that may not
happen much as part of a bigger outfit.
But for Adam Sivitz, who by day
drums for modern-rock band Mercury, it
isn’t his voice he wants listeners to hear
on his instrumental solo album “Under
A Blueberry Moon.” He wants them to
hear the Bali steel pan featured on all 10
tracks that gives the album much more
depth.
The gentle title track mixes world-beat
drums and piano while “The First Sun”
gives the first tropical tinge amid searing
guitar. “Song For Sendai” has woeful
violin and cello; a muffled, throaty bass
adds a deeper layer. Toward the end, the
strings wail before blistering guitar fades
the song out.
“Poppy Orange,” as bright and airy as
its name, is the perfect antithesis to
“Sendai” with tinkling, happy piano.
Sounds of ocean waves and seagulls give
“And The World Jogged On” a calming
quality; you can almost feel the ham-
mock sway beneath you. Mother Nature
works her way in again on “Infrasonic”
via sounds of thunder and rain as tap-
ping on the steel pan mimics the storm.
The only vocals are found on closer
“Olympia Place,” and they come as
snippets of a far-off conversation in a
restaurant as clinking plates and silver-
ware add new percussion elements amid
piano.
While pleasant and a good introduc-
tion to the steel pan, many songs on
“Under A Blueberry Moon” sound simi-
lar to each other, and it’s easy to get lost
— and lose interest, even as you sway in
that hammock.
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
Bali by
'Blueberry'
Adam Sivitz
“Under a Blueberry Moon”
Rating: W W
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concerts
15TH ANNUAL BRIGGS
FARMBLUESFEST
- July 6-7 at Briggs Farm, Nescopeck
Twp. Main Stage, Fri.: Eddy “The Chief”
Clearwater, Linsey Alexander, Alexis
P. Suter Band, Chris Beard; Sat.: Ber-
nard Allison, Moreland & Arbuckle,
Butterfield Blues Band, Rory Block.
Back Porch Stage, Fri.: Lonnie Shields,
The CKS Band, Clarence Spady, Mikey
Junior, Rare Form; Sat.: Lonnie
Shields, Sarah Ayers, Michael Packer
Sam Lay, Jesse Lowey, Symphonic
Haze. Info/directions: briggsfarm-
.com, 570.379.3342.
COVE HAVEN
ENTERTAINMENT RESORTS
1.877.800.5380
www.CPResorts.com
- Howie Mandel: July 22
- Orlando Jones: Aug. 12
- The Charlie Daniels Band: Sept. 2
- Justin Willman: Nov. 18
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
Phone: 570.826.1100
- Zappa Plays Zappa: June 28, 7:30
p.m., $29.50-$75
- Jim Gaffigan: July 26, 7 p.m., $47.50-
$58.25
- Celtic Thunder: Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m.,
$65-$75
- Hal Holbrook: Oct. 20, 8 p.m., $45-
$55
- Straight No Chaser: Oct. 27, 8 p.m.,
$36.45-$46.70
THE KEYS
244 Penn Ave., Scranton
- Ava Luna: Aug. 9, 9 p.m.
KIWANIS WYOMING
COUNTY FAIR
Rt. 6, Meshoppen
Phone: 570.836.9992
www.wyomingcountyfair.com
- Colt Ford / Leah Burkey: Sept. 1, 7
p.m., $5-$15
- New Hollow: Sept. 2, 7 p.m., $5-$15
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe
570.325.0249
mauchchunkoperahouse.com
- Paul Thorn Band: June 15, 8:30 p.m.,
$23
- Peek-A-Boo Revue: June 16, 8:30
p.m., $21
- Leon Redbone: June 22, 8 p.m., $33
- The Felice Brothers: June 23, 8 p.m.,
$25
- US Rails / The Sterling Koch Band:
June 29, 8 p.m., $14
- The Cast of Beatlemania: June 30, 8
p.m., $25
- Sierra Hull / Highway 111: July 7, 8
p.m., $20
- Red Horse: July 21, $25
- Dancin’ Machine: July 20, 8 p.m., $21
- The Persuasions: July 21, 8 p.m., $23
- Solas: July 26, 8 p.m., $28
- Hot Buttered Rum: July 27, 8 p.m.,
$23
- U2Nation (U2 tribute): July 28, 8
p.m., $20
- Suzanne Vega: Aug. 10, 8:30 p.m., $34
- The Cowboy Junkies: Aug. 17, 8:30
p.m., $32
- Michael Kaeshammer: Aug. 24, 8:30
p.m., $17
- Ryan Montbleau Band: Aug. 25, 8
p.m., $20
- Childhood’s End (Pink Floyd tribute):
Sept. 1, 8 p.m., $22.85
- The Allentown Band: Sept. 2, $8-$15
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre
Twp.
- How To Train Your Dragon Live: June
27-July 1, TIMES VARY, $29.50-$79.50
- American Idol Live: Sept. 6, 7 p.m.,
$29.50-$65
- Eric Church / Justin Moore / Kip
Moore: Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m. $37.50-
$47.50 (on sale 6/15, 10 a.m.)
- Disney’s Phineas and Ferb: The Best
LIVE Tour Ever: Dec. 2, 2 p.m., 5 p.m.
$26-$60
MOUNT LAUREL PAC
1 Tamiment Road, Tamiment
570.588.2522
mountlaurelpac.com
- Ziggy Marley / Headshine: June 15, 7
p.m., $42.50-$72.50
- Three Dog Night / Flyin Blind: June
29, 6 p.m., $52.50-$67.50
- The Fab Four / Brian LaBlanc (Neil
Diamond tribute): July 7, 6 p.m.,
$45.50-$62.50
- Air Supply: July 13, 6 p.m., $47.50-
$62.50
- The Temptations: July 22, 4 p.m.,
$47.50-$62.50
- Lyle Lovett: July 29, 6 p.m., $72-$90
- Rock ’n’ Blues Fest ft. Johnny Winter
/ Edgar Winter / Leslie West / Rick
Derringer / Kim Simmonds: Aug. 19, 6
p.m., $57.50-$75.50
- .38 Special: Aug. 24, 6 p.m., $59.50-
$72.50
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
44 Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono
Phone: 877.682.4791
www.mountairycasino.com
- Playboy’s DJ Kay Jay: June 23, 10
p.m., Gypsies, $10
- Colin Quinn: June 30, 8 p.m., Gypsies,
$30-$40
- House Dance Party w/ Teresa Giud-
ice: July 7, 10 p.m., Gypsies. $10.
- KC & The Sunshine Band: July 20, 9
p.m., $40-$55
- JWoww from “Jersey Shore:” July 21,
10 p.m., Gypsies, $15
- Brian McKnight: July 28, 7:30 p.m.,
$40-$55
- Vinny Guadagnino from “Jersey
Shore”: Aug. 11, 10 p.m., Gypsies, $15
- Colin Raye: Aug. 17, 9 p.m., $20-$30
- Grand Funk Railroad: Aug. 18, 9 p.m.,
$25-$40
NEWVISIONS STUDIO &
GALLERY
201 Vine St., Scranton
570.878.3970
- Wrestle & Rock II: Silhouette Lies /
Eye On Attraction / Faceless Shadows
/ Humanity Remains: June 16, 7 p.m.,
wrestling video games; wrestling
merchandise for sale. $7, $1 off admis-
sion if dressed as wrestler. - Those
Clever Foxes CD release / Those
Clever Foxes / Lesser Animals / Down
to Six: June 23, 8 p.m., $6, all-ages
13TH ANNUAL OATS
BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL
Benton Rodeo Grounds (Mendenhall
Lane, Benton)
www.oatsfestival.com, 908.464.9495
- June 28-July 1: Russell Moore & IIIrd
Tyme Out / Gibson Brothers / Valerie
Smith & Liberty Pike / Hillbilly Gypsies
/ Cumberland River / The Roys /
Stained Grass Window / more. Camp-
ing, food, craft vendors. Workshops,
children’s program, music academy,
open jam tent. Weekend advance/$70;
weekend gate/$80; Thurs. $20; Fri.,
Sat. $30; Sun. $10; under 15/free with
adult ticket, pets $10 weekend only.
NORTHEAST FAIR
Suscon Road, Pittston Twp.
Phone: 570.654.2503, www.northeast-
fair.com
- Original music showcase: June 19
- Cabinet: June 20
- Start Making Sense (Talking Heads
tribute): June 21
- Jam Stampede (Jerry Garcia/Grate-
ful Dead tribute): June 22
- The Cast of “Beatlemania:” June 23
- Shawn Klush (Elvis tribute): June 24
PENN’S PEAK
325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe
866.605.7325 or visit pennspeak.com.
- Kellie Pickler: June 14, 8 p.m., $32-$37
- 7 Bridges (Eagles tribute): June 15, 8
p.m., $25
- The Machine: June 16, 8 p.m. $33-
$38.75
- Steven Wright: June 24, 8 p.m.,
$29-$34
- Foreigner: June 29, 8 p.m., $54.25-
$65.25
- Johnny Winter / Magic Slim & The
Teardrops: June 30, 8 p.m., $33
- Cinderella: July 1, 8 p.m., $38.75
- Lita Ford: July 12, 8 p.m., $19
- Arrival (Abba tribute): July 13, 8 p.m.,
$31-$36.75
- Raymond The Amish Comic: July 14, 8
p.m.
- Yonder Mountain String Band: July
15, 8 p.m.
- Uriah Heep: July 19, 8 p.m., $22
- Jim Messina: July 20, 8 p.m., $31
- 7 Walkers: July 27, 8 p.m.
- Vince Gill: Aug. 18, 8 p.m., $59.25-
$64.25
PENNSYLVANIA BLUES
FESTIVAL
Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton
610.826.7700
www.skibluemt.com
July 27, 8 p.m.-midnight; July 28, 1
p.m.-1:30 a.m.; July 29, noon-9 p.m. Fri.
main stage: Mikey Junior & The Stone
Cold Blues Band, Sat.: Marquise Knox,
Michael Burks, Big Sam’s Funky Na-
tion, Joe Louis Walker, Billy Branch &
The Sons of Blues w/ Lurrie Bell,
Carlos Johnson & Demetria Farr. Tent
stage: Dawn Tyler Watson & Paul
Deslauriers, Wallace Coleman, Billy
Branch & Lurrie Bell, Dawn Tyler
Watson & Paul Deslauriers, Wallace
Coleman, Big Sam’s Funky Nation,
Steve Guyger & The Excellos. Sun.
main stage: Naomi Shelton & The
Gospel Queens, Eugene Hideaway
Bridges, Teeny Tucker, Earl Thomas,
Brooks Family Blues Dynasty Ft.
Lonnie, Ronnie & Wayne Baker-Brooks.
Tent stage: Corey Harris, The Brooks
Family Acoustic, Eugene Hideaway
Bridges, Teeny Tucker. On-site camp-
ing, visit website for ticket prices/
info.
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
667 N. River St., Plains
Phone: 570.822.2992
- George Wesley Band: June 15, 8 p.m.,
$5-$8
- The Wood Brown’s Project: June 16, 8
p.m., $5-$10
- Forward / Dub Savage / Evil Bee /
Against the Grain: June 21, 8 p.m., $5
- Clarence Spady Band: June 22, 8
p.m., $5-$8
- Rogue Chimp / Sophistafunk: June
23, 8 p.m., $5-$8
- Jax: June 28, 8 p.m., $5, free with
college ID
- XVSK: June 29, 8 p.m., $5-$8
- Tiny Boxes / Post Junction: June 30,
8 p.m., $5-$8
- Mystery Fyre / Kyle Morgan & The
Lonestar Gramblers: July 6, 10 p.m.,
$5-$10
- Jam Stampede / Kenny Brooks
(Grateful Dead tribute): July 7, 10:00
p.m., $10-$15
- Donna Jean Godchaux Band / Mark
Karan: July 11, 8 p.m., $12-$15
- Driftwood / The Coal Town Rounders:
July 12, 8 p.m., $5-$8
- Connor Kenndy Band (Pink Floyd
tribute): July 13, 8 p.m., $5-$10
- The Idol Kings (Journey and John
Mellencamp tribute): July 14, 8 p.m.,
$8-$10
- Leroy Justice: July 27, 8 p.m., $5-$8
- Sonic Spank / Clay Parnell: July 28, 8
p.m., $5-$8
- Start Making Sense / Great White
Caps (The Talking Heads tribute): Aug.
4, 8 p.m., $8-$15
- Strawberry Jam: Aug. 11, 8 p.m., $5-$8
- Preach Freedom Band / Poogie Bell:
Aug. 17, 8 p.m., $8-$10
8TH ANNUAL SCRANTON
JAZZ FESTIVAL
Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel,
700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton
scrantonjazzfestival.org.
Phone: 570.487.3954
Aug. 3-5: The Average White Band /
The Hot Club of Detroit / Roseanna
Vitro / Giacomo Gates / Bill Good-
winBig Band Tribute to Jaco Pasto-
rious / La Cuccina / more.
SHERMAN THEATER
524 Main St., Stroudsburg
Phone: 570.420.2808, www.sherman-
theater.com
- T.O.N.E-Z / The Pumpkin King / Lil V /
Phatal PHD, more: June 16, 8 p.m., $8
- Mayweather: June 19, 6 p.m., $8
- Hot Tuna Electric / Steve Kimock:
June 28, 8 p.m., $25-$40
- The Stolen: June 30, 6 p.m., $10
advance, $12 day of
- Halestorm / New Medicine / Emphat-
ic: June 30, 8 p.m., $15 advance, $17
day of
- Sinners to Saints: July 13, 6 p.m., $10
advance, $12 day of
- Volbeat / HellYeah: July 18, 7 p.m.,
- KC and the Sunshine Band: July 20, 9
p.m., $40-$55
- ALO: July 21, 8 p.m., $15 advance, $17
day of
- Brian McKnight: July 28, 9 p.m.,
$43-$58
- 311 / Slightly Stoopid (Sherman
Summer Stage, Pocono Raceway,
Long Pond): July 31, 7 p.m., $49.50
- Valencia Vas: Aug. 7, 7:30 p.m., $12
- Kenny Vance and the Planotones:
Aug. 11, 8 p.m., $35-$45
- Collin Raye: Aug. 17, 9 p.m., $35-$45
- Grand Funk Railroad: Aug. 18, 9 p.m.,
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$28-$43
THREE KINGS
603 Route 6, Jermyn
- G. Love & Special Sauce: June 26,
8:30 p.m., $20 advance, $22 day of
TOYOTA PAVILION AT
MONTAGE MOUNTAIN
1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scran-
ton
- Miranda Lambert / Little Big Town /
Thomas Rhett: July 7, 7:30 p.m.,
$36.50-$60.10
- Vans Warped Tour ft. Taking Back
Sunday / New Found Glory / Motion-
less In White, more: July 18, noon,
$37.50
- Mayhem Festival ft. Motorhead /
Slayer / Slipknot / As I Lay Dying /
The Devil Wears Prada / Asking Alex-
andria, more: Aug. 4, $42-$74.50
- The Peach Festival ft. Allman Broth-
ers Band / Zac Brown Band / Tedeschi
Trucks Band / Warren Haynes Band /
O.A.R. / Cabinet / Miz, more: Aug. 10-12,
$99-$225
- Chicago / The Doobie Brothers: Aug.
24, 7:30 p.m., $82-$92
- Kiss / Motley Crue: Sept. 18, 7 p.m.,
$50.85-$185
UNDER THE STARS
SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL
Wells Fargo Amphitheatre at Miser-
icordia University, Dallas.
Phone: 570.674.6719
www.misericordia.edu/theartsand-
more
- Neil Sedaka: July 27, 8 p.m. Tables of
6/$420, amphitheater tickets/$45,
lawn seats/$30.
- Jazz in July concert fea Midiri
Brothers Septet: July 9, 8 p.m. Tables
of 6/$120, amphitheater tickets/$15,
lawn seats/$8.
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
3421 Willow St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.LOVE.222
- Subculture Music Fest feat. Dirty-
phonics / Claude Von Stroke / Eskmo
/ Justin Martin / DJ Dara and more:
June 15, 8 p.m., June 16, 6 p.m.
- The Hives: June 20, 8 p.m.
- Umphrey’s McGee / G. Love: June 29,
8 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE TLA
334 South St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.922.1011
- Tech N9ne / Machine Gun Kelly /
Krizz Kaliko / Mayday / Prozak /
Stevie Stone / Blonde Gang: June 14, 7
p.m.
- Marillion: June 15, 8 p.m.
- Lisa Hannigan / Joe Henry: June 16,
8 p.m.
- Walk the Moon / Find Vienna: June
21, 7 p.m.
KESWICK THEATER
Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glenside,
Pa.
Phone: 215.572.7650
- Bootsy Collins: June 15, 8 p.m.
- Scala / Kolacny Brothers: June 17, 8
p.m.
- Happy Together Tour feat The
Turtles / Flo & Eddie / Micky Dolenz /
Gary Puckett & The Union Gap / The
Grass Roots / The Buckinghams: June
19, 8 p.m.
MANN CENTER
52nd and Parkside, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.893.1999
- Foster the People / Tokyo Police
Club / Kimbra: June 14, 7:30 p.m.
- Jill Scott / KEM / DJ Jazzy Jeff / Eric
Roberson: June 23, 7 p.m.
- Norah Jones: June 28, 7:30 p.m.
TOWER THEATER
69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby
Phone: 610.352.2887
- Fiona Apple / Blake Mills: June 27, 8
p.m.
TROCADERO
10th & Arch St, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.2000
- Bones Brigade: June 21, 8 p.m.
- Face to Face: June 22, 8 p.m.
- Bonnie “Prince” Billy / Michael
Chapman: June 24, 7:30 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
Broad St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.3600
- Neil Diamond: June 18, 8 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
CROCODILE ROCK
520 Hamilton St, Allentown
Phone: 610.434.460
- Sparks the Rescue / Rocky Loves
Emily / Aristo: June 13, 6 p.m.
- Our Last Night / Crown the Empire /
Set It Off / Palisades / Lions Lions:
June 20, 4 p.m.
- Electric Glow Festival: June 22, 8
p.m.
HERSHEYPARK STADIUM
100 W. Hersheypark Dr., Hershey
Phone: 717.534.3911
- Demi Lovato: June 23
- Dave Matthews Band: June 29
SANDS BETHLEHEM
77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem
Phone:
- Kenny G: June 21, 8 p.m.
- Crosby, Stills & Nash: June 24, 7:30
p.m.
- Styx / Ted Nugent: June 29, 8 p.m.
- Alice Cooper: July 1, 8 p.m.
- Bob Saget: July 7, 8 p.m.
- Diana Krall: July 8, 8 p.m.
- Don Rickles: July 12, 7 p.m.
- Andrew Dice Clay: July 14, 8 p.m.
- The B-52s / Squeeze: July 17, 7 p.m.
- Yes: July 18, 7 p.m.
NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY
BEACON THEATER
2124 Broadway, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.496.7070
- The Wanted: June 14, 8 p.m.
- Keane / Mystery Jets: June 15, 8 p.m.
- Aziz Ansari: June 16, 7:30 p.m. and 11
p.m.
- Bonnie Raitt / Mavis Staples: June
20-21, 8 p.m.
- The Ultimate Doo Wop Show: June
23, 8 p.m.
BETHEL WOODS CENTER
Bethel NY
www.bethelwoodscenter.org
- Lady Antebellum / Darius Rucker /
Thompson Square: June 13, 7 p.m.
- Ringo Starr and His All Starr Band:
June 16, 8 p.m.
- Beach Boys: June 17, 7:30 p.m.
- Dave Matthews Band: June 20, 7
p.m.
HAMMERSTEIN BALLROOM
311 W. 34th St, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.279.7740
- Tenacious D: June 28-29, 8 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT IRVING
PLAZA
17 Irving Place, New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Marillion: June 12-13, 7 p.m.
- Q-Tip: June 15, 10:30 p.m.
- Ziggy Marley: June 17, 7 p.m.
- Prodigy / The Beatnuts / Heems,
more: June 19, 7 p.m.
IZOD CENTER
50 State Rt. 120
East Rutherford, N.J.
- Summer Doo Wop Reunion ft. Her-
man’s Hermits / Peter Noone, more:
June 23, 7 p.m.
BORGATA HOTEL AND
CASINO
Atlantic City, NJ
Phone:1.866.MYBORGATA.com
- Wanda Sykes: June 15-16, 9 p.m.
- Josh Wolf / Jen Kirkman: June 22, 9
p.m.
- Beck: June 23, 9 p.m.
- Jim Gaffigan: June 23, TIMES VARY
W
compiled by Noelle Fabrizio,
Weekender Intern
PHOTO COURTESY KELLIEPICKLER.COM
Unlock that honky tonk
Country artist Kellie Pickler will perform Thursday, June 14 at 8
p.m. at Penn’s Peak (325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe).
Pickler released her third album, “100 Proof” in January, and this
will be Pickler’s first appearance at Penn’s Peak.
Tickets are $32-$37 and are available through Ticketmaster or
the venue box office. For more info, call 866.605.7325 or visit
pennspeak.com.
Vesuvio’s is now in Wilkes-Barre
Home of the cheese steak stuffed pizza
111 North Main St. Wilkes-Barre PA
570.824.8747
366 W Butler Dr., Drums PA
570.788.3635
EVEREYDAY
2 Large Plain Pizza’s $19.99 + tax
$1.25 Slice during all happy hours
$2 apps (IHO)
NOW DELIVERING
COME PARTY ONTHE PATIO
NOW SERVINGVESUVIO’S PIZZA
MON - FRI 5-7PM
1/2 PRICE DRINKS
MON & THURS
45¢ WING NIGHT
TUES
$9 PLAIN PIZZA
WED PASTA NIGHT!
$9.99 ALLYOU CAN EAT
PASTA BREAD & SALAD
SATURDAY
9-11PM $2 BOMBS • $3 PINT MIXERS
SUNDAY
5-7PM 1/2 PRICE DRAFTS
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Wednesday:
Arturo’s: Lee Strumski
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Brews Brothers West: Speaker Jam Karaoke Challenge Semi Finals
Hops & Barleys: Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Karaoke
King’s, Mountain Top: Mike Weyrauch
Metro Bar & Grill: Karaoke w/ Joe Miraglia
Ole Tyme Charley’s: DJ EFX All Request Party
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Rox 52: Open mic comedy night hosted by Mike Grady
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Hard Drive
Stan’s Caféé: Open Mic Night w/ Kyle Lucarino
Wise Guys: Open Mic w/ Tom Osborne from The Fallen
Woodlands: STREAMSIDE / SUMMER DECK PARTY with DJ GODFATHER AND
Host Jumpin Jeff Walker of 98.5 KRZ
V-Spot: Eric Rudy Acoustic
Thursday:
Arturo’s: Mark Marros Marathon
Bar on Oak: The Tones
Bart & Urby’s: Twisted Team Trivia
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: The Next
Chacko’s: Bike Night w/ Kartune
Huns’ West Side Caféé: What’s Goin’ On duo
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Bingo
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke
River Grille: DJ Tonez
River Street Jazz Caféé: Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber Mixer 5:30-7:30
Rob’s Pub & Grub: NEPA Beer Pong and DJ Frankie 14
Rox 52: Beer Pong
Rum Runnerz, Dunmore: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Linda and Lauren’s B-day party
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: DJ K Mak
Wise Guys: Karaoke w/ DJ Lucas
Woodlands: Club HD inside Evolution w/ DJ’s RED BULL RON & DJ DATA
V-Spot: Jackson Vee Acoustic
Friday:
Arturo’s: Lipstyk
Bar on Oak: Hip Hop/DJ
Bart & Urby’s: Lemongelli
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Shorty Long
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Just A Mike 6-10 p.m.
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country night w/ DJ Crocket
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Sperazza band
Hops & Barleys: Indoor summer deck party
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: DJ Liz
Liam’s: DJ Freddie Frabbri
Metro Bar & Grill: Adam from Suze on the patio 5-8 p.m., This Time Around
9-1
Ole Tyme Charley’s: M-80
OverPour: DJ Short n Poor
Red Buzzard, Hazleton: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
River Grille: DJ Tonez
River Street Jazz Caféé: George Wesley CD Release Party
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Breakdown Jimmy
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Senunas’: PaulSKO
Slate Bar & Lounge: Deck Party, DJ Hard Drive
Stan’s Caféé: DJ Bernie & Denny w/ Karaoke
Surf Club: Mr. Echo
Tommyboy’s Bar & Grill: Teddy Young 5:30-7:30 then later That 90’s Band
Wise Guys: Destination West w/ DJ Ransom
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub w/ DJ KEV, DJ DAVEY B w/ Host 97BHT.
V-Spot: Double Cross
Saturday:
Arturo’s: Ladies Night
Bar on Oak: The Chatter
Bart & Urby’s: Free Jukebox
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Big Bang Baby
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Dance Party w/ DJ Mike Riley
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Stonecat Duo
Liam’s: Curse of Sorrow, Relic and Ashes of our Sin
Mickey Gannons, Scranton: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Mohegan Sun Arena: Q & Chrome feat. BBQ, Bikes, Cars & Mr. Echo 12-8
p.m.
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karoake & DJ Fiyawerx
River Grille: DJ Ooh Wee
River Street Jazz Caféé: The Woody Brown Project w/ Muppets Titanium
Stardust Machine feat. members of the Big Dirty
Rob’s Pub & Grub: 2
nd
Annual Beer Pong Tournament for Leukemia, DJ Big
Rig
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Slate Bar & Lounge: Sister Esther, ½_ way to the end of the world party
Stan’s Caféé: Karl Metzger
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Ostrich Hat
Wellington’s: Mr. Echo
Wise Guys: Live Entertainment
Woodlands: Evolution - DJ Kev the Rev V-Spot: Destination West featuring
The Switch
Sunday:
Banko’s: Mr. Echo 2
nd
Year Anniversary
Bart & Urby’s: Benefit for Amanda Sod Braley 4-9 p.m.
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Robb Brown
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: UUU
The Getaway Lounge: Ronnie Williams
King’s , Mountain Top: Chixy Dix
Metro Bar & Grill: Don Shapelle on the patio 6-9 p.m.
Other Side Bar, Freeland: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Woodlands: The Tones Band and DJ Godfather
V-Spot: Gong Karaoke
Monday:
The Getaway Lounge: Karaoke w/ DJ Hard Drive
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Unplugged Monday - Open Mic
River Grille: Bean Bag Toss Tournaments
Rob’s Pub & Grub: NEPA Beer Pong
Wise Guys: DJ Ransom
Woodlands: Bartender Deck Party
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin
The Getaway Lounge: Karaoke
Grotto, Edwardsville: Game Show Mania w/ DJ Mike Walton
Grotto, Harvey’s Lake: The Blend
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke & DJ Fiyawerx
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Free Jukebox, Free Pool
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ L & F
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night
The Woodlands: Comedy & Karaoke
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Surf Club
Freeland • 10-2
Sat.,6/16
Q and Chrome
Featuring BBQ, Bikes and
Cars at Mohegan Sun
Casino, Wilkes-Barre
12-8 ... then
Wellington’s
Clarks Summit • 9:30-2
Sun., 6/17
CELEBRATE MR. ECHO’S 2ND
BIRTHDAY WITH US AT
Banko’s
West Nanticoke • 6-9
YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS ONE!!
PLAYING VINTAGE TUNES AT A BAR NEAR YOU!
ZEPPELIN • BEATLES • DOORS • STONES
AND MANY MORE
WWW.MRECHOBAND.COM
FACEBOOK.COM/MrEchoBand
MRECHOBAND@GMAIL.COM
7
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FRIDAY
THURSDAY
SUNDAY
WEDNESDAY
WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY
WEDNESDAY
SATURDAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
STAN’S CAFE
570.829.9779
CLAMS
15¢ EACH
IHO
OPEN MIC NIGHT W/
KYLE LUCARINO 9-1
OPEN JAM SESSION
HAPPY HOUR 8-12
MILLER HIGH LIFE $1.75
HAPPY HOUR 8-10
HOUSE MIX DRINKS $2
HAPPY HOUR 8-10
MCGILLICUDDY SHOTS $1.75
KARL METZGER
9-1
PEEL AND EAT
SHRIMP (IHO)
$3.95 1/2 LB.
DJ BERNIE & DENNY 9-1
W/ KARAOKE
KITCHEN OPEN 1-8PM
DRINK EM TILL
THEY’RE GONE!
GENNY CREAM ALE OR
TWELVEHORSE ALE
$1.25 BOTTLES ALL DAY
NEVER A COVER
AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST. WILKES-BARRE
BAR HOURS 7AM-CLOSE • KITCHEN HOURS WED-SAT 5-9 SUN 1-8
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FIESTA
FRIDAY
MONDAY
35¢
WINGS
YUENGLING
PINTS
YUENGS & WINGS
$1.50
TUESDAY
CHICKEN OR
STEAK KABOBS
CORONAS
FIREFLY
MIXERS
TACOS
$2.00
$2.50
$2.00
$2.00
WEDNESDAY
MILLER LITE
PINTS
BURGERS
$1.50
$5.00
THURSDAY SATURDAY FRIDAY
ANY PIZZA
BOMBS
HALF OFF
SUNDAY
CHEESESTEAKS
COORS LIGHT
PINTS
$5.00
$1.50
$3.00
$2 HAPPY HOUR
$2 DRAFTS MIXERS
AND SHOTS
EVERYDAY 8-10 PM
570-235-1037 • 279 South River St, Plains 18705 (located across from bakery delite)
$1 CANS 10-MID
ALL SUMMER!
SANGRIA
$3.00
2 PM-2AM MON- FRI • SAT & SUN OPEN AT NOON
TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS
LOVE IT IN THE CAN
DJ OOH WEE
DJ SHORT N POOR
FRIDAY, JUNE 22ND
FRIDAY, JUNE 15TH SATURDAY, JUNE 23RD
NO
COVER
TIL
10PM
N E P A T A T T O O . C O M
HAZLETON • WILKES-BARRE • SCRANTON • DICKSON CITY
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Green piece
By Jen Stevens
Special to the Weekender
R
egardless of where you
stand on environmental
issues, it is safe to say that
the majority of us enjoy a good
beer. So for those of us who are
concerned about the environ-
ment, we are happy to see that
many breweries throughout the
country are changing the way
they brew their beer and are
focusing more and more on the
environment.
Coors was the first to develop
recyclable aluminum beer cans.
As one of the largest beer com-
panies in the world, Coors also
sells ethanol, which is resold to
gas stations that cater to eco-
friendly drivers. Sierra Nevada is
another large brewery and has
more than 10,000 solar panels
that allow the company to power
almost the entire facility in an
eco-friendly fashion. The Brook-
lyn Brewery, located in the heart
of Brooklyn, uses wind turbines
to generate all the electricity for
the brewery which makes them
the first company in New York
City to be powered entirely by
wind power.
Magic Hat Brewing Company,
located in South Burlington, Vt.,
is also on the list of eco-friendly
breweries. Magic Hat currently
has a “Clean In Place” system
that is used in the fermentation
tanks in order to decrease the
amount of BOD (biochemical
oxygen demand) in its water
system. This system is designed
to eliminate having someone go
into the tank and scrub with
harsh chemicals and use a contin-
uous stream of water to clean the
tanks.
The brewery built a cooler in
early 2000 that uses the cold air
from outside to cool it during the
winter to conserve electricity.
Typically beer consists of water,
hops, yeast and barley. Magic
Hat uses hops that come from
U.S. producers and the barley
from Europe. The ingredients are
obtained from well-respected
sources that have strict quality-
control practices. The brewery
makes sure to recycle all of the
bottles that aren’t used on the
bottling line, as well as paper and
cardboard. Magic Hat reuses the
rinse water from the bottling line
as well.
If you’re a beer lover it’s good
to know you can enjoy a tasty
beverage from many breweries
all while preserving the envi-
ronment. Here are a few other
eco-friendly breweries to check
out: Odell Brewing Company
and New Belgium Brewing
Company, both in Fort Collins,
Colo., and Eel River Brewing
Company from California, which
was the first brewery in the state
to be certified organic. Now that
the green movement is starting to
catch on people are really begin-
ning to pay attention to what they
consume and how environmen-
tally sustainable things are. W
There are plenty of environmentally friendly brewing
companies out there.
Environmental
imbibing
stage
T
he Little Sisters of Hoboken
make a return to the stage
this summer in “Nunsense
2: The Second Coming” when the
musical opens the Nuangola Grove
Theatre’s 2012 season Friday, June
15.
The original “Nunsense,” writ-
ten by Dan Goggin, follows a tale
of Mother Superior and her merry
band of sisters-turned-cabaret
performers after the convent expe-
riences a mass of unexpected
deaths. To pay for the burials, the
sisters put on a wildly successful
fundraiser cabaret show. The se-
quel, which follows five of the
original characters after their per-
formance launches theminto the
spotlight, promises all the same
hilarious and ridiculous antics.
The Grove first staged “Nun-
sense” three summers ago, and it
was one of the theater’s bestselling
shows since reopening its doors in
2007.
“Since the audience was so
receptive the first time, we’re hop-
ing that they’ll want to come back
and see what kind of other crazy
things the nuns can get into,” said
Michael Marone, the theater’s new
executive producer and owner of
Cutting Edge Productions, which is
producing the 2012 season.
Marone is a veteran of North-
eastern Pennsylvania theater, com-
ing to the Grove after six seasons
as artistic director at the Pennsylva-
nia Theatre of Performing Arts in
Hazleton. He has also worked for
Little Theatre of Wilkes-Barre and
the Music Box Dinner Theatre in
Swoyersville.
While he generally has enjoyed
his career in the area, he admits to
sometimes having to “fight the
‘coal-cracker stigma’” which
makes it hard to sell shows that are
“off the beaten path,” and a lot of
productions stay in the safe zone of
well-known Broadway titles or
productions with successful movie
versions.
“But every nowand then, you
get to squeeze in something just for
the artistic sake, and your die-hard
followers will still come out and
enjoy it,” he shared.
Those supporters in Nuangola
have a lot to look forward to with
Marone at the theater’s helmfor the
next fewseasons. If the shortened
summer season goes well (Ma-
rone’s late arrival led to the normal
four productions being cut to three
this year), the Grove is exploring
the possibility of expanding to a
full-year production season. The
theater is hoping to stage a fall
youth production as well as a
Christmas showthis year. By 2013,
it hopes to be able to convert to the
year-round schedule.
Marone has found the Grove
staff and Nuangola community to
be extra supportive and motivated
to help the theater succeed.
“The ladies who work at the
theater are always asking for new
ways to help, trying to be an active
part of what’s going on,” he said.
“Even though they’re not theatrical
people and don’t appear on stage,
they want to see positive things
happening in their community.
They don’t want the stigma of,
‘Well, there’s nothing to do in this
town!’”
All of this support will help ease
Marone’s transition fromhis last
theater to the Grove a bit easier.
Working with roughly one-sixth
the stage space and cutting rehears-
al time down froma comparatively
leisurely five weeks to daily re-
hearsals for half that time, he’s
feeling the crunch. This summer,
the Grove continues to employ
professionals for its summer stock,
so condensing the paid rehearsal
time was a must.
“But still, all of our actors are
local talent and absolutely fab-
ulous. Of the five people in the
cast, three either have degrees or
are pursuing degrees in musical
theater, including both of our lead-
ing ladies.”
Marone emphasizes the gems of
talent that NEPAtheater has in its
midst.
“It’s great to go to NewYork or
big cities to see shows, but there’s
wonderful talent right in our back-
yard. Every professional actor who
makes it big has to start small
somewhere. If we can’t support
theater on a small scale, it means
our talent won’t make it further.” W
A no 'Nunsense'
season opener
“Nunsense 2: The Second
Coming,” June 15-16, 22-23, 8
p.m., June 17, 24, 3 p.m., Nuan-
gola Grove Theatre (5177 Nuan-
gola Road, Nuangola Lake).
$20, season passes $50. Info:
570.868.3582, GroveTick-
ets@frontier.com
You never know what will happen when the Little
Sisters of Hoboken hit the stage.
By Danielle Wayda
Weekender Correspondent
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movie review
S
ummer movies are, by
design, dumb. But they’re
dumb for a very good
reason. When it gets hot outside,
our brains function at a slower
pace, and we can’t process any-
thing more complicated than the
sight of Rihanna almost cursing
at something that may or may not
be a lobster. Summers movies
serve as a vaguely entertaining
distraction, something we can
kind of pay attention to as our
bodies recharge in the cool, dark
theater.
But sometimes summer mo-
vies overreach. Sometimes sum-
mer movies try to be a little bit
more than explosions crudely
superimposed over a close up of
somebody’s hand jingling car
keys. Sometimes summer movies
attempt to be profound and artful
by awkwardly inserting empty,
philosophical discussions about
“faith” in between scenes of
phallic aliens jumping into peo-
ple’s mouths. Sometimes summer
movies turn out to be as laugh-
ably pretentious as “Prometheus.”
“Prometheus,” the prequel to
“Alien” that director Ridley
Scott, for whatever reason,
doesn’t want to admit is a pre-
quel, opens with the first of
many needlessly cryptic scenes:
A monk-like humanoid stands on
a cliff and drinks from something
that looks like a decaying canta-
loupe. As he drinks, a spaceship
takes off into the stratosphere
leaving the humanoid behind to
quickly disintegrate into a river
below. This scene and others like
it are never properly explained. Is
it the birth of the human race?
An alien committing suicide after
his crewmates abandoned him?
What? There’s nothing wrong
with ambiguity or with making
your audience draw their own
conclusions but in “Prometheus,”
the onus is on the audience to do
the screenwriter’s job for them.
At any rate, the monolithic
Weyland Corporation (which has
cast a large sinister shadow
throughout the entire “Alien”
franchise) dispatches the titular
spacecraft Prometheus to a planet
whose location has been foretold
by a series of cave paintings and
other ancient artifacts. The expe-
dition is led by archeologist
Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace
star of the original “The Girl
with the Dragon Tattoo”) and her
smug boyfriend (Logan Mar-
shall-Green), who both believe
that the planet’s inhabitants may
be responsible for creating hu-
manity. But as in the previous
“Alien” films, the Weyland Corp.
has an ulterior motive for this
mission. Does it involve flute-
based space technology, needless
references to Stephen Stills and
Guy Pearce in old-man makeup
so unconvincing it looks like his
makeup artist threw wet tissues at
his face from across the room?
I’ll never tell!
In spite of what Scott and
screenwriter Damon Lindelof
may think, “Prometheus” is not
this generation’s “Solaris,” which
actually took the time to flesh out
its characters and better define
their motivations. “Prometheus,”
however, takes its sweet time
going absolutely nowhere. With
the exception of the cold, yet
oddly charming android David (a
great Michael Fassbender), the
characters are walking ciphers
that are never recognizably hu-
man. “Solaris” also made sure its
storyline wasn’t riddled with plot
holes. Did the crew of the Pro-
metheus really think it was a
good idea to take off their space
helmets and walk unarmed into
an otherworldly catacomb seem-
ingly made out of spinal cords
and trust that the pale, hulking
humanoids in black, bone-lined
spacesuits that live there
wouldn’t punch them to death?
Wouldn’t a biologist realize that
when something hisses at you it
probably doesn’t want to be
cuddled? Also, why would you
want to cuddle something that
looks like a cross between a
cobra, a silverfish and a penis?
Quite frankly, “Prometheus” is
a mess. If you need to watch
some crazy, affected nonsense
about ancient astronauts, save
your money and watch an old
episode of “In Search Of…” on
YouTube for free.
Michael Fassbender as the android David in a scene from ‘Prometheus.’
By Mike Sullivan
Weekender Correspondent
Pretentious 'Prometheus'
reel attractions
Honest Abe is set to kick some honest ass. Is it wrong to hate it already?
Opening this week:
“Rock of Ages”
“That’s My Boy”
Coming next week:
“Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter”
“Brave”
“Seeking a Friend for the End of the World”
Rating: W W1/2
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agenda
BAZAARS/FESTIVALS
Covington’s 64th Annual
Fireman’s Picnic July 11-14, 6
p.m. nightly; 3 p.m. Sat. Ride tickets
start $1.25. Family night July 11. Fire-
man’s Parade, 7 p.m., July 12. Tommy
Guns Band, July 13. Fireworks July 14.
Ride wristbands some days. To
participate in parade, call
570.842.8237.
Jefferson Twp. Fire Co. Car-
nival through June 16, 5 p.m. night-
ly; 2 p.m. Saturday. Info: 29Fire-
Rescue.com
Northeast Fair June 19-24, 20
Freeport Road, Grimes Industrial
Park, Pittston Twp. $9. Food, music,
rides, games. Info: 570.654.2503,
northeastfair.com
St. Faustina’s Parish Annual
Homecoming Festival June
29-30, 5 p.m.-midnight; July 1, 4-11
p.m., St. Faustina Grove, Sheatown.
Live music, food, games.
BENEFITS / CHARITY
EVENTS
American Cancer Society
•14th Annual Relay For Life of
Wyoming Valley: June 16-17, King’s
College Betzler Fields, Wilkes-Barre
Twp. Info: relayforlife.org/pawyo-
mingvalley.
• Share-a-Pair: June 21, 1 p.m.,
McCann School of Business and
Technology (2227 Scranton Carbon-
dale Highway, Dickson City). $5
donation and new pair of underwear.
For info call Joseph Unis,
570.687.7366.
Candy’s Place (570.714.8800)
• 3rd Annual Cancer Wellness Golf
Open: June 14, registration/lunch 10
a.m., shotgun start noon, cocktails,
dinner following, Irem Country Club
(397 Country Club Road, Dallas).
$125/person, $500/team, $40/dinner
only. Golfers get lunch, snacks,
dinner, mini-massages. To register
call or visit cancerwellnessnepa.org.
The Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society
• Shoot for the Stars Beer Pong
Tournament: June 16, 3 p.m., Robs
Pub & Grub, Larksville. $10/21+, $5/
under 21. Entry fee includes one free
pitcher of beer, pizza per team.
Prizes, raffles. All proceeds benefit
society. Call 570.592.2711 for info.
• Concert for a Cure: June 16, 7 p.m.,
Wyoming County Fairgrounds (6
Route, Meshoppen). Coy Taylor, Erica
Leigh, The Infinity. Free, donations
encouraged. To donate, call
800.482.2873.
EVENTS
4th Annual Polka for Pets
June 17, noon-5 p.m., Lehighton
Community Grove (7th and Iron
Streets, Lehighton). Free. Pennsylva-
nia Villagers, 2-5 p.m. Animal rescue
groups attending, food, refresh-
ments. Rain or shine.
25th Annual Junior
Achievement Business Hall
of Fame June 28, 5:30 p.m., Genetti
Manor, Dickson City. Honoring Dr.
Jim and Mary Lou Burne, Robert
Moisey, Tom Pugh, Entrepreneur of
the Year John Kiesendahl. For info,
call 570.602.3600, visit janepa.org.

Brawl on Broad Street pre-
sented by Highly Competitive Wres-
tling June 16, 7:30 p.m., J.J. Ferrara
Performing Arts Center (212 W. Broad
St., Hazleton). $10 advance, $12 at
door, kids 12 and under $5. Tickets
via hcwpro.com.
Cameo House Bus Tours
(Anne Postupack, 570.655.3420,
anne.cameo@verizon.net, checks to
933 Wyoming Ave., W. Pittston, Pa.
18643)
• Sneaker Sunday / Coney Island /
Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market: June 24.
Depart W-B Wegmans 7:30 a.m. (park
near Applebee’s), Viewmont Mall, 8
a.m. (Sears parking lot). Depart
Brooklyn 6 p.m. $80, includes “follow
us bus,” breakfast treat, goodie bag,
water and more. Call or e-mail to
reserve; seats assigned as payments
received.
Clifford United Methodist
Church (Main St. Clifford)
• Hero HeadQuarters: June 18-22,
1-4:30 p.m. Registration June 18, 12:30
p.m. Learn heroes from Bible, partici-
pate in group activities, skill-building
challenges. Towers of nickels collec-
tion for Society of St. Andrew. Info:
570.222.5493, 222.4049, 222.3331
• Church Dinner: June 20, 4-6 p.m.
Choice of chicken-n-biscuit, ham. Eat
in, take out. Dinner, dessert, drink.
$7.95.
ConynghamUnited Metho-
dist Church (411 Main Street,
Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conyng-
hamumc.com)
• Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m. Beth Moore
study, “Jesus, the One and Only.” All
women welcome.
Dedication and Unveiling of
Carol Ann Drazba Memorial
June 16, 2 p.m., Gino Merli Veterans
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34
puzzles
ACROSS
1 Reason to scratch
5 Droop
8 “Arrivederci, -”
12 “Scat, gnat!”
13 Oklahoma city
14 Dutch cheese
15 Admonition to
Nanette
16 Popular board game
18 Cold, treeless terrain
20 Folklore figures
21 Part mine, part yours
23 Consumed
24 Obelisk, e.g.
28 Use a swizzle stick
31 Paid athlete
32 Continental money
34 Historic period
35 Mannered man
37 Pocket embroidery,
maybe
39 Scatter seeds
41 Horseback game
42 Headache aid
45 Deodorant type
49 Carbon -
51 Queen of Carthage
52 As well
53 Regret
54 Love child?
55 Encounter
56 - Angeles
57 Quaint “not”
DOWN
1 “- that cute?”
2 Biblical pronoun
3 Mass. neighbor
4 Hex
5 Metal used in magnets
6 Commotion
7 Group of hoodlums
8 Moves a fern, maybe
9 Device measuring
distance traveled
10 Having XY
chromosomes
11 Poehler and Adams
17 - shoestring
19 Regulation
22 Razor sharpener
24 Gasoline stat
25 Raw rock
26 Baloney
27 Award winners
29 A Gershwin
30 Aries
33 Unaccompanied
36 Additionally
38 - Gate Bridge
40 Candle material
42 Mosque VIP
43 Composer Porter
44 Young female
46 Old Italian money
47 Smell
48 Inquisitive
50 Pair on stage
last week
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H
Oak St. Pittston TWP.
654-1112
Wed.
LINE DANCE 7-11
Thurs.
THE TONES
8-11
Fri.
HIP HOP/DJ
9-2
Sat.
THE CHATTER
9-1
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Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
Mary Bove of Wapwallopen with Ronnie Winter, lead
singer of Red Jumpsuit Apparatus at The Wood-
lands in Plains Twp. July 10, 2011.
ralphie report
the
By Ralphie Aversa
Special to the Weekender
F
irst, she meets the guy.
Then she gives him her
number and infamously
says, “Call me maybe.” Fast
forward to the end of the
track, and Carly Rae Jepsen
now terribly misses the guy
she just met. But no, Jepsen
insists she isn’t some crazy
“Stage 5 clinger.”
“Well, I time-travel in my
song,” Jepsen joked on “The
Ralphie Radio Show.” “‘Be-
fore you came into my life, I
missed you so bad’ makes
absolutely no sense unless you
felt it, which is the guy that I
wrote that about. There was a
feeling that something was
missing, then he came in to
my life, and I was like, ‘Oh,
you were the thing I missed.’”
By the way, in the wake of
“Call Me Maybe,” things un-
folded quite well for Jepsen:
She calls the guy who in-
spired the world-wide hit her
boyfriend.
“Every time (‘Call Me May-
be’) comes on, he’s like,
‘That’s my song!’” Jepsen
said. “It worked out OK.”
But Jepsen said the song
was never actually intended to
court her lover, rather she
simply just wanted to write a
fun song about “playing Cu-
pid.”
“I’ve never actually asked a
guy for his number that way,”
she revealed. “I do have kind
of like a spontaneous part of
my personality that comes out
every once in a while. I did a
kiss-and-run
once.”
Yes, exactly
how it sounds.
Jepsen ran up to
a guy, planted
one on him, and
sprinted away.
Not sure if one
would classify
that as “playing
Cupid,” but spon-
taneous nonethe-
less. The singer
was quick to
clarify that the
mark was not her
boyfriend; it
happened before
the two started
dating.
While Jepsen
didn’t say if her
new-found fame
impacted her relationship, she
did note that she is having fun
living her hectic schedule.
“I don’t think I could be
going at this pace if I wasn’t
enjoying it,” she noted. Just
two days before taping our
interview in Philadelphia, the
singer performed in Las Vegas
at the Billboard Music
Awards. “It’s the adrenaline
and the rush of having so
many things that I love doing
that kind of keeps me through
the days where I’ve only slept
a couple hours. It’s totally
worth it.”
Jepsen’s schedule looks
pretty filled through the end
of the year. She is currently
working on a full-length al-
bum that will be released this
fall and will coincide with
Jepsen’s support of Justin
Bieber’s “Believe” tour. The
Canadian singers will perform
44 dates across North Amer-
ica from September through
January. The tour stops in
Philadelphia on Sunday, Nov.
4 at the Wells Fargo Center.
Jepsen also confirmed that her
LP will include a collabora-
tion with The Biebs. Bieber
and his manager Scooter
Braun co-manage Jepsen and
landed her a record deal in
the U.S. with Interscope Re-
cords. W
Listen to “The Ralphie
Radio Show” weeknights
from 7 p.m.-midnight on 97
BHT.
CARLY RAE JEPSEN
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G
illy
’s
Steak • Seafood • Italian
1146 South Main Avenue Scranton, PA 18504
Wednesday-Friday, 4 to 9 p.m., and Saturday from 5 to 10 p.m.
GILLYSSCRANTON.COM
570.961.1030
Late Night Menu & Martini Bar
FIND
US ON
FACEBOOK
7
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theater listings
ACTORS CIRCLE AT
PROVIDENCE PLAYHOUSE
(1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reser-
vations: 570.342.9707, actorscir-
cle.org)
• John McInerney’s “Where the
Bleep is Poor Tom?:” July 12-15.
Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. $8/
general, $6/seniors, $4/students.
CORNER BISTRO DINNER
THEATRE
(76-78 S. Main St. Carbondale,
570.282.7499)
• “Voices of Legends:” June 29,
8:30 p.m. $15. Optional appetizer
buffet, $6, 7:30 p.m. Reservations
only, call.
DIETRICH THEATRE
(60 E. Tioga Street, Tunk-
hannock, 570.996.1500,
dietrichtheater.com)
• “The Gifts of Wali Dad:”
June 22, 10 a.m., June 23, 11 a.m.
All ages. By Dietrich Children’s
Theatre. Free. Tickets at door or
call to reserve.
• Poe in the Park: Much of Mad-
ness: June 23, 7 p.m., Lazybrook Park,
Tunkhannock. Ages 12+. By Gamut
Theatre Group. Free. Discussion on
Edgar Allan Poe, 6:45 p.m. Following
show, actors will host talkback ses-
sion. Bring blanket/chair.
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
(71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre,
570.826.1100)
• “West Side Story:” Aug. 2-3, 8 p.m.
Presented by Wyoming Seminary
Performing Arts Institute. $20/adults,
$12/students, seniors. Tickets in
advance or at door. Call 270.2186 for
info.
THE GASLIGHT THEATRE
COMPANY
(570.824.8266 or visit gaslight-theat-
re.org, gaslighttheatre@gmail.com)
• “Playroom” An Evening of One-Act
Plays by Regional Authors: June 14-16,
7 p.m., King’s College Theater (133 N.
River St., Wilkes-Barre). $10/person
$8/students, seniors. Some plays
contain adult language/content.
Viewer discretion advised.
GRICE ARTISTS
(191 W. Church St., Nanticoke,
570.328.5864)
• PA Lyric Opera: Pirates of Pen-
zance, June 22-24; Madame Butterfly,
Aug; Hansel and Gretel, Nov.
HARRIS CONSERVATORY
FOR THE ARTS
(545 Charles St., Luzerne,
570.287.7977, joanharrisdancers.com)
• Best of the Best: Joan Harris
Centre’s 30th Anniversary Gala: June
15, 6:30 p.m.; June 16, 1 & 6 p.m., F.M.
Kirby Center (71 Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre). $16/advance, $20/door.
HIGHWIRE THEATRE
SCHOOL
(570.947.3484, HighwireTheatreS-
chool@gmail.com)
• Acting Classes: Wed., Fri., through
June 29, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Holy Rosary
School (312 William St., Scranton).
THE HOUDINI MUSEUM
THEATER
(1433 N. Main Ave., Scranton,
570.342.5555)
• Psychic Theater’s “Haunted! Mys-
teries of THE Beyond:” Nightly
through Sept. 15, curtain rises 7 p.m.
$35. Reservations required. 3 hours
or longer. For info, visit PsychicThea-
ter.com, call 570.383.9297.
MUSIC BOX PLAYERS
(196 Hughes St., Swoyersville:
570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY or
musicbox.org)
• “Fiddler on the Roof Jr.:” June
22-24. $14. Call for show times/info.
• “Avenue Q:” July 20-Aug. 5. Dinner
and show, show only.
PENNSYLVANIA THEATER
FOR PERFORMING ARTS
(JJ Ferrara Center, 212 W. Broad St.,
Hazleton, 570.454.5451, ptpash-
ows.org)
• “1776:” June 29-30, July 6-7, 7 p.m.;
July 1, 8, 3 p.m. Dinner/show tickets
available. Reservations/more info by
phone or online.
SCRANTON SHAKESPEARE
FESTIVAL
• “Midsummer Night’s Dream:” June
30, July 1, Nay Aug Park.
SHAWNEE PLAYHOUSE
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplay-
house.com)
• “They’re Playing Our Song:”
Ongoing until Sept. $28/
adults, $25/seniors, $15/
children. Call/visit website
for tickets, show times, more
info.
• S.T.A.R.S. on Stage: through
Aug. 31. Shows 10 a.m. June 15:
Princess Stories; June 16: Pirate
Stories. $5. Summer package, 7
shows, $30.
• Forbidden Broadway’s Greatest
Hits: June 15-Sept. 2. $28/adults,
$25/seniors, $15/children. Call/visit
website for tickets, show times, more
info.
• “Aladdin Jr.:” June 21, 10 a.m.
• Summer Preview Cabaret: June 22,
7 p.m.
• “The Shawnee Story:” June 23, 2
p.m.
THEATRE AT THE GROVE
(5177 Nuangola Rd., Nuangola,
570.868.3582, grovetickets@fron-
tier.com, nuangola-grove.com. $20/
musicals, $18/plays, season pass/$50.
BYOB)
• “Nunsense 2: The Second Coming:”
June 15-16, 22-23, 8 p.m., June 17, 24, 3
p.m.
• “No Sex Please, We’re British:”
Aug. 3-4, 10-11, 8 p.m., Aug. 5, 12, 3 p.m.
W
-- compiled by Alexa Cholewa,
Weekender Intern
Send your listings to:
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market Street
Wilkes-Barre PA18703 or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline for
publication is Mondays at 2 p.m.
novel approach
W
hile Toni Morrison’s
works often encompass
recurrent themes, her
newest novel, “Home,” demon-
strates one absolute premise that
follows her characters everywhere
—loss. Through this theme, the
characters make connections to a
home that becomes less about
place and more about the people
we leave behind.
Set in the 1950s, “Home” in-
troduces readers to protagonist
Frank Money. In the beginning of
the novel, readers track Frank
after his flee froma mental in-
stitution. When he escapes, there
is only one word on his lips —
home. However, even after being
uprooted and serving his country,
he finds that America has not
changed and is no more grateful
than when he left.
Prior to the asylum, Frank
served in the Korean War. As a
veteran, readers come to assume
that his institutionalization was
due to a deteriorating mental
status. His flashbacks, which
come often, are likened to what is
nowdiagnosed as post-traumatic
stress disorder, a disease that
would not be formally recognized
until 1980.
Frank is motivated to escape
after receiving a dire letter regard-
ing his sister Cee. Though he
describes his past life as “worse
than any battlefield,” he returns to
his home of Georgia in order to
save Cee. Even considering the
physical war is left behind, his
homecoming signals an internal
war, one that takes hold of readers
until the very end.
Morrison’s capacity to write
about loss and the grotesque
reveals itself in a variety of ways.
Foremost, the atrocities of Frank’s
wartime experiences have not left
him. Days pass, and the images
come back vividly to haunt him,
and likewise, the readers. Here,
Morrison, as she has done with
much of her fiction in the past,
employs a technique of demon-
strating brutality without judg-
ment. Morrison merely presents
the situation, and readers sit back,
take it all in and dissect the pieces.
The second most-disturbing
aspect of the novel is Cee’s pre-
dicament. While her life seems to
have improved after years of
torment fromher abusive step-
grandmother, Cee soon becomes
part of an experiment. Even with
the first wave of the civil rights
movement, Morrison offsets the
fight for equality with the deprav-
ity of what Cee is forced to en-
dure.
“Home” is best described as
beautifully poetic prose. In com-
parison to Morrison’s previous
novels, it is less complex and
brief. There are instances
throughout the novel that feel
incomplete, but even considering
the brevity of this fast-paced
novel, Morrison succeeds by
leaving readers wanting more.
Once again, Morrison has estab-
lished her ability to master the
page and captivate readers with
every turn.
“Home”
by Toni Morrison
Rating: W W W W
War at
'Home'
By Kacy Muir
Weekender Correspondent
Morrison’s
capacity to write
about loss and the
grotesque reveals
itself in a variety
of ways.
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panning 40 miles through
Northeastern Pennsylvania,
the Lackawanna River
Heritage Trail has been a re-
source for joggers, nature lovers
and the like for about the past 15
years. While that rail-trail system
continues to grow, its devel-
opment probably shouldn’t be
taken for granted.
“The trail is such a valuable
resource,” said Mark Meier, a
volunteer for the upcoming third
annual Heritage Explorer Bike
Tour and Festival. “And it’s one
of those things that if no one is
willing to really step forward and
maintain it, then it goes away.”
Hosted by the Lackawanna
Heritage Valley National and
State Heritage Area (LHV) and
Heritage Valley Partners, Inc.,
the non-competitive tour and
festival will be Saturday, June 16
at Mellow Park in Peckville. The
registration fees will go toward
the continued development of the
trail.
“Trails cost a lot of money to
build, and it takes a long time to
get them funded,” said Natalie
Gelb, executive director of the
Lackawanna Heritage Valley
Authority, the management entity
of the heritage area. “Like right
now, we’re busy with the parts of
the trail that are finished, trying
to get more amenities, like
benches, trash containers and …
directional signage as well as
interpretive signage.”
What Gelb means by “in-
terpretive signage” is markers
that will “help people understand
all about these sites and the his-
tory of the area.” After all, that’s
one of the primary goals of the
LHV.
“Our mission, essentially, is to
preserve, conserve and educate
the public about all of our won-
derful historic, cultural, econom-
ic and natural resources,” Gelb
shared.
Promoting the trail ranks fairly
high on the association’s priority
list.
“I mean you look at our goals,
the trail really helps us fulfill all
of those things: Connecting the
people and communities to each
other and telling the story
through signage and enhancing
the quality of life in the region,”
Gelb said, adding that about 100
volunteers will be helping the
day of the event.In turn, the bike
tour provides more exposure to
the trail, bringing everything
full-circle. Mike Toye, another
volunteer and co-chair of the
event noted that last year’s Heri-
tage Explorer Bike Tour drew
more than 450 people.
“We didn’t make millions,” he
said, laughing. “We promoted the
trail to a lot of people that didn’t
know it was there, so we ac-
complished our goal that way.”
Gelb noted that there are 345
participants pre-registered so far
and an expected turnout of about
600 people, and participants can
choose from four routes, ranging
from five to 44 miles.
The festival is free and open to
everyone and will feature ven-
dors, exhibits, raffles and enter-
tainment by The Merchants of
Groove Blues Reunion (featuring
Teddy Young), Don Shappelle
and the Pickups and Jason O.
There will also be a children’s
bike rally and youth run.
Gelb, whose passion for local
history is palpable, stressed how
taking part in the tour and festiv-
al allows residents to “be part of
telling the story and be part of
the story.”
“I like to say we celebrate the
past, but we don’t live in it. we’re
building new traditions and heri-
tage every day,” she said.
Meier echoed that claim.
“It’s really easy to assume that
there’s some association sort of
taking care of things for you,” he
said. “But once you’ve actually
helped produce it, you realize
how much of what goes on is
actually due to other people who
are interested enough to make it
happen, and I think that’s really
quite amazing, that this area has
a lot of that.” W
Heritage Explorer Bike Tour
and Festival: June 16, 8 a.m.,
Mellow Park, Peckville. Festival
11 a.m.-4 p.m. $35/adults;
$25/seniors, students, mil-
itary; $50/family of four;
$120/team up to six adults.
Info: HeritageExplorer.org,
570.963.6730 ext. 8200
The third annual Heritage Explorer Bike Tour and Festival will celebrate the
Lackawanna River Heritage Trail Saturday, June 16. Above, a scene from last year’s
tour.
Bike tour helps
maintain Heritage
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
EVERY WEDNESDAY EVERY WEDNESDAY
KARAOKE NIGHT with KARAOKE NIGHT with
DJ BOUNCE 10-12 DJ BOUNCE 10-12
$1 MILLER LITE DRAFTS 10-12 $1 MILLER LITE DRAFTS 10-12
INDOOR SUMMER
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DECK PARTY
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EVERY FRIDAY!!
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$2.50 CORONA BOTTLES $2.50 CORONA BOTTLES
$1.50 LANDSHARK DRAFTS $1.50 LANDSHARK DRAFTS
8-10 PM 8-10 PM
ACOUSTIC TUESDAYS ACOUSTIC TUESDAYS
AARON BRUCH AARON BRUCH
$2 IMPORTS 10-12 $2 IMPORTS 10-12
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WWW.GROTTOPIZZAPA.COM
GROTTO PIZZA AT HARVEYS LAKE
THE GRAND SLAM SPORTS BAR (639-3278)
ENTERTAINMENT STARTS FRIDAY’S AT 9 P.M.
Tuesday, June 19th
The Blend @ 6:30
Friday, June 15th
Sperazza Band
GROTTO PIZZA IN THE GATEWAY SHOPPING CENTER
IN EDWARDSVILLE (331-3278)
Tuesday Nights in June
Game Show Mania w/ DJ Mike Walton 7 - 9 p.m.
WIN FABULOUS PRIZES INCLUDING A BLU-RAY PLAYER!
LABATT BLUE PINTS JUST $2.00!
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Center (401 Penn Ave., Scranton).
RSVP to 570.383.9552.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,
www.dietrichtheater.com) calendar
of events:
❏ Kids Classes:
• Quilting for Kids: “Monkey’s
Wrench:” Wed., through June 13,
3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6+. $6/class. Call to
register.
• Quilting for Kids: “Streak of Light-
ning:” Wed., June 20-July 25, 3:30-5
p.m. Ages 6+. $6/class. No experience
required. Call to register.
• Crazy Commercials: June 25-29, 10
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Ages 9-14. $60. Call to
register.
• Digital Arts Camp: June 25-29,
1:30-3:30 p.m. Ages 8-14. $60. Clayma-
tion, robotics, special effects, more.
Call to register.
❏ Intergenerational Classes:
• Quilting for Everyone: “Arrowhead
Star:” Wed., through June 13, 6-7:30
p.m. Ages 6+. $6/class. Call to regis-
ter.
• Introduction to the Game of Go:
June 18, 25, July 2, 6-7 p.m. Ages 11+.
Free. May end with tournament. Call
to register.
• Open Studio and Portfolio Prep:
7-8:30 p.m. Session 3, June 19, 26;
session 4, July 3, 10, 17, 24; session 5,
July 31, Aug. 7, 14, 28. $15/class, $60/4
classes. Call to register.
• Quilting for Everyone: “Trip
Around the World:” Wed., June 20-
July 25, 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 6+. $6/
class. Call to register.
❏ Adult Classes:
• Pottery for Beginners: 7-8:30 p.m.
Series 3, June 20, 27; series 4, July 11,
18, 25, Aug. 1; series 5, Aug. 8, 15, 29,
Sept. 5. Ages 13+. $60/class. All mate-
rials supplied. Call to register.
• Decorative Painting: Noon-3 p.m.,
June 13, 20, 27, July 11, 18, 25, Aug. 15,
22, 29. Ages 16+. $20/class plus cost
of painting surface. Pre-registration
required, call to register.
• Introduction to Stained Glass:
June 18, 6-9 p.m. Ages 16+. $60. All
glass supplies, equipment provided.
Call to register.
❏ Special Events:
• The Potential of Living Willow
Structures in the Landscape: June
20, 7 p.m. All ages. Free. Info: bonnie-
gale.com
Falls and Exeter Lions Clubs
Golf Tournament June 16, Ema-
non Golf Course, Falls. Info:
570.333.4825, 388.2204, 654.7031,
lionsgolf@frontier.com.
Jim Thorpe events:
❏ Thursday Date Night (jim-
thorpe.org):
• June 14: Tours 6 & 7 p.m. of The
Old Jail.
• June 21: Tours 6 & 7 p.m. of Asa
Packer Mansion.
Justus Volunteer Fire Co.
(159 Fieldstone Dr., Scott Twp.,
570.587.4545)
• Golf Tournament: June 23, regis-
tration 8 a.m., shotgun start 9 a.m.,
Wemberly Hills Golf Course (Wember-
ly Hills Road, Scott Twp.). $55/golfer.
Includes green fees, golf cart, on-
course food, refreshments. Info:
536.1902
Keep Wine-ing He Might
Start to Look Like Prince
Charming Comedy Tour June
14, 7:30 p.m., Bartolai Winery (Route
92, Exeter Twp.). Jeannine M. Luby,
Liz Russo. $15, advance sales only.
Call 570.650.7518 or visit NotPrince-
Charming.com.
Misericordia University
events (www.misericordia.edu,
570.674.6400, box office 674.6719):
• Pinewood Derby Race hosted by
Boy Scouts of America: June 16, 9
a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission, $10 dona-
tion for race, patch, photo. Info:
ebs.ticketleap.com/derbyday/
• Annual Diversity Camp: June 17-21,
for students entering grades 11-12. For
info, contact high school guidance
counselor or call 570.674.1483.
The NEPA Miners: (www.nepa-
miners.com or 570.604.4438)
• Host the Capital City Atoms: June
16, 7 p.m. Tickets at Sports Fever
(Mall at Steamtown) or online.
The Osterhout Free Library
events (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, www.osterhout.info,
570.821.1959)
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed.,
5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
• Knit & Crochet Group: June 16, 30,
10:30 a.m.-noon. All ages welcome.
Free.
• World Wide Knit in Public Day:
June 16, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Bring yarn,
knitting needles. Free. Call to regis-
ter.
• Palm Reading: June 22, 3-4:30 p.m.
Free event. Call to register.
• Remembering Agnes: June 23, 2
p.m. Movie, discussion. Free, light
refreshments. Call to register.
PA Jazz Alliance Presents
Steve Smith and Vital In-
formation 30th Anniversary
Tour June 26, 7 p.m., The Historic
Radisson Hotel Grand Ballroom,
Scranton. Tickets/info: 570.383.9413,
carol@magdonmusic.net
The Poets June 22, doors 6:30
p.m., show 8 p.m., Irem Country Club
Pavilion (70 Ridgway Dr., Dallas). $25.
Reserved tables for additional fee.
Advance sales only, call
570.675.4465, ext. 241.
Safe Haven Dog Rescue
(www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe-
Haven@epix.net)
• Adoption Day: June 17, 11 a.m.-3
p.m., Tractor Supply (Route 209,
Brodheadsville). Dogs available to
meet and get to know. Pre-adoption
application with references, home
visit required prior to adoption.
• Volunteer Meeting: June 19, 6:30
p.m., Cherry’s Restaurant (Route 209
near Route 534, Kresgeville). Volun-
teers, foster families always wel-
come. Volunteers needed for adop-
tion days, dog transport, fundraising,
clerical help, home visits, more.
Foster homes needed.
Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort
events:
❏ Community Concert Series (free, 7
p.m., rain or shine):
• Mt. Winds: June 19
• Riverside Rhythm: June 26
St. Michael’s Ukrainian Or-
thodox Church (540 N. Main
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
St. Paul’s United Methodist
Church (Birch St./Prospect Ave.,
Scranton)
• Free Community Dinner: June 16,
4:30-6:30 p.m. All are welcome. Info:
570.346.4488
St. Stephen’s Episcopal Pro-
Cathedral (35 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600)
• Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.
• Clothing Closet: free clothing for
men, women, children. Open Tues.,
4-6:30 p.m., Wed., noon-3:30 p.m.
Teen Program Orientation
June 20, 1:30 p.m., Meadows Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center (55 W.
Center Hill Road, Dallas). Pre-regis-
tration required. Info: 570.675.8600
ext. 195
Unity: A Center for Spiritual
Living (140 South Grant St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.824.7722)
• A Course in Miracles / Holistic
Fitness-Yoga Sessions: Tues., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.
• Meditation Chakra Clearing
Deeksha: 2nd, 4th Mon., 7-8:30 p.m.
$8. Oneness meditation, chakra
clearing/energization, transfer of
Divine Energy. Welcome beginning,
experienced meditators, all paths.
Info: 587.0967, ernie@divinejoymi-
nistry.com.
The University of Scranton
events:
• Scranton Brass Seminar: through
June 22, weekdays, Houlihan-McLean
Center. 2-week intensive daily pro-
gram of workshops, master classes,
clinics, coaching. Info: music@scran-
ton.edu
• Recital featuring students of The
Scranton Brass Seminar: June 22,
7:30 p.m., Houlihan McLean Center.
Free. Call 570.941.7624.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
events:
• Ballroom Dancing Lessons: Wed.,
7:15 p.m., Comm auditorium. Basic &
advanced ballroom, swing. $15/
person. For info, call Vince Brust at
489.3111.
• Special Needs Children Camp:
June 18-22, “Knights, Princesses and
Dragons;” Aug. 6-10, “Mount Olympic;”
Aug. 13-17, “It IS Easy Being Green.” 10
a.m.-2 p.m. $35/week. Call/visit web-
site for info.
• Summer String Camp: June 18-22,
9 a.m.-noon. Beginner, intermediate,
grades 5-9. $100. Call/visit website
for info.
Wyoming Seminary Per-
forming Arts Institute (201
North Sprague Avenue, Kingston,
570.270.2186). Events free and open
to public.
• Counselor Solo and Chamber
Recital: June 25, July 16, 8 p.m., Great
Hall (228 Wyoming Ave., Kingston).
Free, open to public.
• Student Solo and Chamber Recital:
June 28, July 5, 11, 18, 25, 31, Aug. 1, 8
p.m., Great Hall (228 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston). Free, open to public.
Y Walk Wed. Guided evening
walks in Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton.
Begin 6 p.m., meet in lobby either
city’s YMCA. In case of rain, walk
same time following day. Info:
Wilkes-Barre YMCA, 570.823.2191;
Hazleton, 455.2046:
❏Wilkes-Barre:
• June 13: A Walk on the Wild Side:
The Kirby Park Natural Area
• June 20: Mansions and Millionaires
• June 27: Wings Over Wilkes-Barre
❏ Hazleton:
• June 13: United Way Walk
• July 25: Hazleton’s Hispanic Eat-
eries & Bodegas
HISTORY
Eckley Miners’ Village (located
nine miles east of Hazleton, just off
Route 940; 570.636.2070; www.eck-
leyminers.org)
• Patch Town Days: June 16-17, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Music, food, presenta-
tions.
Electric City Trolley Mu-
seum and Coal Mine Tour
(Cliff Street, Scranton 570.963.6590)
Museum open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Ex-
cursions: Wed.-Sun. 10:30 a.m., noon,
1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. Rides: $10 adults, $9
seniors, $7.75 ages 3-12. Mine open
daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tours hourly, $8
adults, $7.50 seniors, $5.50 ages 3-12.
Everhart Museum (1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 35
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 28
Believe the hype
“Passion,” an exhibit featuring original photography by Teri
Moore, will be on display through Friday, Aug. 3 in the Wid-
mann Gallery at King’s College (Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center,
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre). There will be a discussion with
Moore Friday, June 15 from 6-8 p.m. at the gallery.
Moore is a resident of Wilkes-Barre and is part of the 365 Pro-
ject, which aims to document a person’s life by taking a photo
each day. She completed the Graphic Design Certificate Pro-
gram at Luzerne County Community College in 2009.
The gallery is open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Sat-
urday and Sunday as arranged. For more info, call 570.208.5900,
ext. 5328, or visit kings.edu. Above, “Believe.”
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www.everhart-museum.org)
• Buzz Camp Day Camp for Grades
K-2: June 25-29, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Com-
bines art/science of bees w/ inter-
active learning. Pre-register by June
13.$65 museum members, $75 non-
members. Info: programs@everhart-
museum.org
• Glamour on the Grass: June 30, 6
p.m. $25 at door. Guest appearance
by Jay McCarroll. Tom Graham, John
Smith, Nowhere Slow, VJ Steven
Waface. Food, drink. Fashion, hair
and makeup.
• European River Cruise: April 8-15,
2013. From $2,549/member, double
occupancy, plus air. Info:
570.504.7575, EverhartRiverCruise-
.com
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232 Mon-
roe Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841)
❏ Summer Downtown Walking Tours
(free and open to the public):
• Sat., June-Oct., 11 a.m. Call for
starting places.
• Rotating trio of tours First Fridays,
through Oct., 5 p.m., Radisson, Lacka-
wanna Ave.
• Custom Tours: 7-8 blocks, about 2
hours. Routes selected based on
interests of participants Most days,
noon-6 p.m. $5/person, min. 4 peo-
ple, max. 30. Call 955.0244.
• Step-on bus tours, Costume Tours:
Call for info.
Lycoming County Historical
Society Thomas T. Taber
Museum(858 W. Fourth St., Wil-
liamsport, 570.326.3326, www.lycom-
ing.org/lchsmuseum)
• Coffee Hour: June 14, 10 a.m. Ex-
plore aspects of U.S. Civil War. Free.
Call/visit website.
• Historical Impression: Civil War
Widow: June 17, 2 p.m. Free. Call/visit
website.
Oldest House Historical
Society
• River Weekend: June 23-24.
Pennsylvania’s Anthracite
Heritage Museum(McDade
Park, Scranton: 570.963.4804,
www.phmc.state.pa.ust) Open year
round, Mon.-Sat. from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
and Sun., noon-5 p.m.
• Camp: July 17-20, 9 a.m.-noon. $50,
includes snacks, supplies. Call to
reserve.
LEARNING
Academy of Northern Mar-
tial Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston)
Traditional Kung Fu & San Shou. For
Health and Defense. Adult & Chil-
dren’s Classes, Mon.-Thurs., Sat. First
class free. Walk-ins welcome, call
371.9919, 817.2161 for info.
Adult Kung Fu (Kung Fu & Tai
Chi Center, Wilkes-Barre:
570.829.2707)
Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30
p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art
open hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed.,
6:30 p.m. Covers Chinese style theo-
ries, concepts, applications. “Sport”
fighting concepts explained, prac-
ticed.
Art Classes at the Georgia-
na Cray Bart Studio (123 Brader
Dr., Wilkes-Barre, 570.947.8387,
gcraybart-artworks.com)
• Adult (Ages 13+): Mon., Tues.,
noon-4 p.m. (3 hrs painting, 1 hr
group critique), $30/class payable
monthly. Tues., Wed., 6-9 p.m. (stu-
dent chooses length of time), $15/1 hr,
$18/1 1/2 hrs, $20/2 hrs, $25/2 1/2 hrs,
$30/3 hrs, per class payable monthly.
• Children: Ages 9-12, Mon.-Wed.,
4:30-5:30 p.m., $15/class payable
monthly. Ages 13+, joins adult class,
individuals select amount of time to
participate. Portfolio prep instruction
available for college bound students.
Private lessons available.
BallroomDancing Class
through June 14, Thurs., 6-7 p.m.,
Mid-Valley Senior Center (310 Church
St., Jessup). $5/class 55+, $7/class
others. Taught by certified members
of Dance Educators of America
Joanne and Ed Samborski. Foxtrot,
waltz, swing, rumba, tango, samba,
hustle, more. Call 570.489.4415.
BallroomDance Class through
June 29, Fri., 12:30-1:30 p.m. U.N.C.
South Side Senior Center (425 Alder
St., Scranton). Taught by certified
members of Dance Educators of
America. Foxtrot, samba, waltz,
rumba, swing, more. $5/class for 55+,
$7/class others. Info: 570.346.2487
Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152,
www.dancecontours.com)
• Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
• Children/teen classes: ballet, tap,
CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of
dance blending basic Jazz Technique
with styles of street dance, hip hop.
• Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
• Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Danko’s Core Wrestling
Strength Training Camp
(DankosAllAmericanFitness.com)
• Four sessions/week, features two
clinics, two core strength. 4 ses-
sions/week. Increase power, speed,
agility. Group discounts, coaches,
teams, clubs, free stuff. Visit website
or call Larry Danko at 570.825.5989
for info.
Downtown Arts at Arts
YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787, www.art-
syouniverse.com)
• Kids Craft Hour with Liz Revit: Sat.,
10:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Make jewelry, paper
mache, more. $15, includes supplies.
For info or to register, call 817.0176.
• Traditional Egyptian Belly Dance:
Wed., beginners 6-7 p.m.; intermedi-
ate 7-8 p.m. intermediate. $10. Call
343.2033 for info.
• Tribal Fusion Dance: Thurs., begin-
ners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate 7-8 p.m.
$10. Call 836.7399 for info.
• Cabaret with Helena: Sat., 4:30
p.m. Pre-registration required. Call
553.2117 for info.
• African Dance: Wed. & Sun., 1 p.m.
Traditional African moves with jazz
and hip-hop. $10, registration re-
quired, call 212.9644 or visit hipbody-
soul.com for info.
Extreme M.M.A.(2424 Old Ber-
wick Rd., Bloomsburg. 570.854.2580)
• MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m.
First visit free. Wrestling funda-
mentals, basic Brazilian Ju-Jitsu No
Gi. Call for info.
• Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class:
Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free.
Non-combative class.
• Personal Training: Call 317.7250 for
info.
Fazio’s Hapkido Do Jang (61
Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Accepting new students. Children
(age 7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Teen/adult Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15 p.m.;
Tues.-Thurs., 6:30-8 p.m. Private
lesson also available.
Learn Hapkido. Self defense applica-
tions. $50 monthly, no contract.
GreenBeing (334 Adams Ave.,
Scranton, info@shopgreenbeing.com)
• Not Your Granny’s Sewing: one-on-
one lessons: $40/lesson, $140/4
sessions, 2-3 hour sessions. Tailored
to individual needs.
GregWorks Professional
Fitness Training (107 B Haines
Court, Blakely, 570.499.2349, gregs-
bootcamp@hotmail.com, www.vip-
fitnesscamp.com)
• Beach Body Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri.,
6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m.
• Bridal Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 &
8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. Bridal party group
training, couples personal training
available.
• Fitness Bootcamp: 4-week ses-
sions, Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1
p.m.
• New Year’s Resolution Flab to Fab
Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.,
Sat., 1 p.m. Guaranteed results.
• Private/Semi-Private sessions
available, e-mail for info.

Guitar & Bass Lessons avail-
able from Fox Studios (11 Rhine Creek
Rd., Drums) Mon.-Thurs. 1-10 p.m. $16
per hour. All ages, all styles of music,
all levels. Call 570.788.4797 for info.
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music Instruction
• Private Ballroom Lessons
• Private Vocal Instruction: Tues.
evenings.
• Private Guitar Instruction: Classi-
cal, acoustic, electric for all ages.
• Dragons’ Tale Karate: Mon., 5:30-7
p.m.; Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 5+.
• Tumbling: Fri., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages
5+. $30/month.
Horse Back Riding Lessons
Elk Stables, Uniondale, by appoint-
ment only. All levels welcome. Call
570.575.8649 to schedule.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
• Taking Portraits: Natural Lighting
and Basic Flash Photography: Sun.,
through June 17, 1-2 p.m. $59.99/3-
weeks. No experience necessary.
Camera required. All ages. Call to
register.
• Kid’s Art Class: All About Art: Sat.,
ages 11-16. Sun., ages 5-10. $100-$125/
month, $30/class. Supplies included.
Call to register.
Northeastern Ju-Jitsu (1047
Main St., Swoyersville, 570.714.3839,
nejujitsu.com)
Open 7 days/week, offers training in
Traditional Karate, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu,
boxing, Judo, Women’s self defense.
Group, private self defense classes
available by appointment.
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb-
.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com)
• Dimensions in Dance w/ Lee La-
Chette: Jazz, tap, ballet for adults &
kids. $10/hour, $5/second class.
E-mail or call 991.1817.
• Vocal lessons w/ Joelle Colombo
Witner: Wed., Sun. E-mail or call
991.1817.
Private Voice Lessons Mon.-
Thurs. by appointment. Learn proper
singing technique in downtown
Wilkes-Barre studio. Specializing in
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 38
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 34
Duck, duck … llama?
The exhibit “Llama, Llama, Duck & Clay” will be displayed
Saturday, June 16 through Sunday, July 8 at Butternut Gallery &
Second Story Books (204 Church St., Montrose). There will be
an opening reception Saturday, June 16 from 6-8 p.m.
The exhibit will feature photography by Lesli and Kirk VanZand-
bergen and pottery by Archie Johnson and Ruth Cohen.
During this exhibit the Butternut will be open Wednesday-Sat-
urday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Starting in July, it will also be open Sun-
days, noon-4 p.m. For more info, call 570.278.4011.
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opera/classical/musical theater.
Hour, half-hour lessons. Student
discounts available. Please call
824.5428 or visit www.katrinaly-
kes.com for info.
Royce Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Net-
work, Scranton. Day, evening class-
es for men, women, children. Ongo-
ing classes 6 days/week. Covers
sport, combat, self-defense aspects
of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. For info visit
gracie-nepa.com or call 570.347.1107.
Sil-LumKung-Fu & Tai-Chi
Academy (509 Pittston Ave.,
Scranton)
• Yang Style Tai-Chi: Taiji Qigong,
Taiji Sequence, Taiji Stationary Push-
ing Hands, Taiji weapons classes. For
info, call Master Mark Seidel,
570.249.1087.
Something Special: (23 West
Walnut Street Kingston,
570.540.6376, angiethear-
tist@aol.com, www.angelademu-
roart.com)
• MANGA Art Class: (Japanese Car-
tooning) Wed., 4-5 p.m. Learn the art
of Japanese cartooning. 4-week
session, supplies included: $60 per
child. Call or e-mail to register.
Southside Senior Center (425
Alder St., Scranton, 570.346.2487)
• Language Partnership English &
Spanish Classes: Fri., 10 a.m. Free,
open to all. For info, call 346.0759.
St. Joseph’s School classes
(1627 N. Main Ave., Scranton,
570.963.0500):
• Traditional Weapons Class: Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. Self-defense techniques
using cane, club, short stick, wooden
sword, escrima sticks, more. Learn
history principles, practical use. No
prior martial arts experience. $10/
class.
• Women’s Self-Defense Class: Sat.,
10 a.m.-12 p.m. Self-defense tech-
niques to protect from variety of
attacks. No prior martial arts experi-
ence. Wear loose fitting clothes.
$10/class.
World Class Boxing (239
Schuyler Ave., Kingston,
www.wcbboxing.net, 570.262.0061)
• Boxing & Kickboxing Fitness Boot-
camp: Mon.-Sat. non-contact pro-
gram
Programs include Kids & Teen Boxing
programs, striking for MMA & compe-
tition training, women’s-only kick-
boxing Boot Camp, Zumba, more.
Wyoming Valley Goju Ryu
Karate Academy
• Classes Tues., Thurs. (kids: 5:30-7
p.m.; teens/adults: 7-8:30 p.m.); Sat.
(kids: 10:30 a.m.-noon; teens/adults:
Noon-1:30 p.m.), Kingston Rec. Center
(655 Third Ave., Kingston).Info:
888.328.3218, valleygojukarate.com
Wyoming Valley Art League
• Painting with Irina Krawitz: $15/
hour, $120/4-weeks. Call 570.793.3992
for info.
MIND AND BODY
2&4 Hand Drumming Circle
Freestyle drum circle, every second/
fourth Sat., any time between 1-4
p.m., Everything Natural (426 S. State
St., Clarks Summit). All ages, new-
comers, old timers welcome. Hand
drums, percussion provided. Free, no
pressure.
Absolute Pilates with Leslie
(263 Carbondale Rd., Clarks Summit,
www.pilateswithleslie.com)
• Mon., Wed., Fri., 9-10 a.m. Private
training on Cadillac, Reformer and
Wunda Chair, along with Pilates mat
classes, stability ball core classes,
more. Check website for updates.
• Mon., Wed.: Nia Technique, 5:30
p.m.
• Nia Technique Workshop: June 16, 11
a.m.-12:30 p.m., Jim Thorpe Arts in
Motion (434 Center St., Jim Thorpe).
$15. To register, visit jtartsinmo-
tion.com/Classes/Nia-Technique or
call 570.483.8640.
Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
❏ Studio J, 2nd floor
• Meditation in tradition of Gurdjieff,
Ospensky: Sun., 12-1 p.m., $5
• Children’s Meditation: Thurs., 6-7
p.m. Ages 9-14, $5
• Tarot Card Readings, by appoint-
ment. $20 first half hour, $10 addi-
tional half hours.
Awakenings Yoga (570.472.3272)
• PrivateYoga Instruction w/ certi-
fied senior Instructor of Himalayan
Institute. 24 years experience. Learn
secrets of Himalayan Masters. Les-
sons include asana, pranayama,
meditation, relaxation, ayruveda,
holistic nutrition, tantra. $75/session
Balance Ultimate Fitness
(Belladaro Prof Bldg, 570.862.2840)
• Early Morning Fitness Bootcamp:
Tues./Thurs., 6:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m., Sat,
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., $15 or 12 classes
for $150.
Balance Yoga and Wellness
(900 Rutter Ave., 2nd floor, Kingston,
570.714.2777, balanceyogastudio.net,
balanceyogawellness@gmail.com)
• Pole Fitness: Fri., 5:30 p.m. (begin-
ner); 7 p.m. (intermediate). Sat., 1:30
p.m. (all levels); 3:15 p.m. (advanced).
Bellas Yoga Studio (650 Boule-
vard Ave., Dickson City,
570.307.5000, www.bellasyoga.com,
info@bellasyoga.com)
All workshops $15, pre-registration
suggested.
• Sun. Class: 10-11:15 a.m. Features
Alternating Vinyasa style yoga w/
yoga fusion.
Club Fit (1 West Broad St., Hazle-
ton, 570.497.4700, www.clubfithazle-
ton.com)
• Boxing classes w/ Rich Pastorella
(pastorella.net26.net). Mon., 7-8 p.m.
$40/month.
Dietrich Theater, Tunkhan-
nock (60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock:
570.996.1500)
• Yoga for You: Wed., 10-11:15 a.m.
Series 2, June 13, 20, 27; series 3,
July 11, 18, 25, Aug. 1, 8, 15; series 4,
Aug. 22, 29, Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26. $60/6
classes, $15/single class. Bring mat or
towel. Call to register.
• Kundalini Yoga: June 30, July 28,
Aug. 11, 10-11:30 a.m., Tunkhannock’s
Riverside Park. Ages 16+. $15/class.
Call to register.
Egyptian Belly Dance Class-
es with Dianna Shahein. Call
570.343.2033 for various times/
locations. Private/group classes
available.
Endless Mt. Zendo (104 Hollow
Rd., Stillwater, 570.925.5077,
www.endlessmountainzendo.org,
endless@epix.net)
• June Sesshin: June 15-23. Begins 6
p.m. opening night w/supper, ends
by 10 a.m. w/informal breakfast last
Sat.
Goddess Creations Shop &
Gallery (214 Depot St., Clarks Sum-
mit, 570.575.8649, info@goddess-
creations.net)
• Tarot Card Readings by Rev.
Whitney Mulqueen by appointment.
Call.
• Tarot Readings: Thurs., 6-9:30 p.m.
at Montrose Inn, Restaurant & Tavern
(26 S. Main St., Montrose). $25 for
15-20 min.
• Monthly astrology workshop with
Holly Avila: first Sun., $45. Call.
Goshin Jitsu Martial Arts
Classes Every month at Golight-
ley’s Martial Arts (Mark Plaza Shop-
ping Center, Rt. 11, Edwardsville).
Focus on cardio, stretching, defense,
stamina, more. Self defense, cardio,
karate aerobics also available. $75/
month. Call 570.814.3293 for info.
Haifa Belly Dance (Haifabelly-
dance.com, 570.836.7399)
• Mon., 5:15 p.m., Serenity Wellness &
Dance Center (135 Main St., Luzerne)
• Wed., 6 p.m., Holistic Health Center
(Route 6, Tunkhannock)
Hoop Fitness Classes (whirli-
gighoopers.com)
• Beginner/Intermediate: Mon., 7:30
p.m., Harris Conservatory (545 Char-
les St., Luzerne). $5. Call 718.0673 to
reserve.
• Beginner/Intermediate: Thurs.,
5:30 p.m., Studio 32 (32 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre) $5.
Inner Harmony Wellness
Center (Mercy Hospital General
Services Bldg., 743 Jefferson Ave.,
Scranton, 570.346.4621, www.inner-
harmonywellness.com, peterama-
to@aol.com)
• Meditation Technique Workshops:
Wed., 6:30 p.m. $15/session. Goal
setting/stress reduction, more. Call
for info/reservation.
Jeet Kune Do Fighting Con-
cepts Teaches theories of move-
ment in Martial Arts. $100/month. Call
instructor Mike DiMeglio for info,
570.371.8898.
JimThorpe Arts in Motion
(434 Center St., Jim Thorpe,
570.483.8640, jtartsinmotion.com)
• Friday Night Drop-in Class for
Chair Yoga, Guided Meditation, Spirit
Connections: $8/class, $15/all three.
Elemental Alchemist AnneMarie
Balog, Level II Lakshmi Voelker Chair
Yoga instructor. Private/group med-
itation sessions, reiki treatments,
classes, yoga, tarot readings/parties,
divination consultations. Contact
881.2399, shantispirit23@live.com.
Info: jtartsinmotion.com/Classes/
elementalalchemist
Kwon Kodo Lessons: Learn
self-defense system that combines
Korean Martial Arts such as Hapkido,
Taekwondo & Kuk Sool. Lessons held
at Hapkido Taekwondo Institute (150
Welles St., Forty Fort). $40/month.
For info, call 570.287.4290 or visit
htkdi.com.
Leverage Fitness Studio (900
Rutter Ave., Forty Fort, 570.338.2386,
www.leveragetrainingstudio.com)
• Morning Wake-Up Workout: Full
body metabolic, Mon., Wed., Fri.,
7-7:45 a.m.
• Primal Scream Classes: Tues.,
Thurs. 7-8 p.m.
• Inferno: High Intensity Interval
Training: Sat., 10 a.m.
All classes free to members, $10
non-members.
Meditation/Yoga classes at
Spectrum Health & Racquet Club (151
Terrace Dr., Eynon). Meditation: Fri.,
7-8 p.m. Yoga: Sat., 9:45-10:45 a.m. $5
each class, bring mat. Call
570.383.3223 for info.
Melt Hot Yoga (#16 Gateway
Shopping Center, Edwardsville,
570.287.3400, melthotyogastu-
dio.com)
• Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. (90
minutes)
• Tues., Thurs., 4 p.m. (one hour)
• Sat., Sun., 9 a.m., 3 p.m. (90 min-
utes)
Motivations Fitness Center
(112 Prospect St., Dunmore.
570.341.7665)
• Sandstorm Fitness with Rachel
“Kali” Dare: Learn various techniques
and shed pounds. Call for info.
NutriFitness Boot Camp (311
Market St., Kingston, 570.288.2409)
• Free week of Boot Camp for new
members: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m., 5:30
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 39
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 35
That’s a wrap
“Wild About Flowers,” featuring work by Andrea Robbins-Rim-
berg, and “Vacation Time,” featuring pieces by Penny Ross, will
be on display through Sunday, June 17 at the Gallery at the Po-
cono Community Theater (88 S. Courtland St., East Strouds-
burg).
Exhibit hours are Monday-Thursday, 3:30-9 p.m.; Friday-Sat-
urday, 3:30-11 p.m.; and Sunday, 12:30-9 p.m. For more info, call
570.421.3456 or visit poconocommunitytheater.org.
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& Games
Sunday, June 24th
FAMILY DAY EVENTS
Featuring “JUST US”
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Thursday, June 21st
5 pm: Vendors, Games & Rides
6 pm: Open Time Capsule
8 pm-11 pm: Tommy Gunn
Friday, June 22nd
5 pm-7 pm: Blend
8 pm-11 pm: M80
Saturday, June 23rd
Noon: Start time
2 pm-4 pm: Parade
3 pm-7 pm: Short and Poor
8 pm-11 pm: 40lb Head
9 pm: Fireworks
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www. fortyfort125. com
Wednesday, June 20th
5 pm-10 pm: One Price Rides
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Sponsored by Dunkin Donuts
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Sponsored by: Sordoni Construction & Northeast Beverage
Featuring
Yuengling
p.m.
• Wirred: Mon., Wed., 6:45 p.m., Sat.,
10 a.m. $5.
• Yoga: Thurs. 7 p.m. $10.
• Tang Soo Do Karate Classes: Mon.,
Wed., 6:45 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. Call to
register.
Open Your Eyes To Dream
(143 W. Main St., Bloomsburg,
570.239.7520, www.oyetd.com)
❏ Open-Eyed Yoga. Call 394.2251 or
go online for current updates/can-
cellations. E-mail: yoga@oyetd.com
• Beginner Vinyasa: Mon., 5:30-6:30
p.m.
• Level II Vinyasa: Mon., 7-8:30 p.m.
• Mixed Level Vinyasa: Tues., 9-10:30
a.m., Wed., 6:30-7:45 p.m.
Mats & props available. Student/
package discounts available. Bring
friend to first class, get two for price
of one.
Pocono Yoga & Meditation
Classes (570.472.3272, www.Poco-
noYoga.com) Classes with Suzi,
certified yoga instructor
• Gentle Yoga: Thurs., 6:30 p.m., East
Mountain Apartments. Free to resi-
dents.
• Private Yoga Instruction: Only by
appointment. $35 per hour. Call.
• Private Meditation Instruction:
Only by appointment. $35 per hour.
Call.
Prana Yoga Studio (1112 Wheeler
Ave., Dunmore, 570.341.8886,
www.pranayogadunmore.com) Class-
es taught in vinyasa flow, geared for
all levels
• Mon.: Advanced, 6 p.m.; tai chi
with Blake Wheeler 7:30-8:45 p.m.,
Thurs., 8:45-10 p.m., $45/month, on
class/week, $65/month, two classes/
week. Contact Blake at 434.989.1045
or blakewhlr@yahoo.com for info.
• Tues.: Beginner, 10 a.m.; Open
Level, noon; Beg./Intermediate, 5:30
p.m.; Intermediate, 7:30 p.m.
• Wed.: Beginner, 5:30 p.m.; Ad-
vanced 7:30 p.m.
• Thurs.: Open Level, 10 a.m.; Beg./
Intermediate, 5:30 p.m.; Intermediate,
7:30 p.m.
• Fri.: Open Level, 10 a.m.; Advanced,
6 p.m.
• Sat.: Beg./Intermediate, 10 a.m.;
Intermediate, noon.
• Sun.: Intermediate, noon; Candle-
lit Open Level, 6 p.m.
Reiki Classes (570.387.6157,
reikictr@localnet.com) Sessions with
Sue Yarnes:
• Beginner to Advanced Reiki at our
locations or your home. Hospital
endorsed, training for professional
Usui Reiki teacher certification
available. Call or e-mail for info.
The Self Discovery and Well-
ness Arts Center (Montrose,
570.278.9256 or e-mail well-
ness@epix.net, wellnessarts.com)
• Summer Solstice Celebration: June
20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $10 donation.
Energy clearing, labyrinth walk,
guided meditation, music, sharing,
refreshments.
Sandy Seyler Studio (House of
Nutrition, 2nd floor, 50 Main St.,
Luzerne, 570.288.1785, SandySeyl-
er.com)
• Solstice Celebration: June 24, 2-5
p.m. $40. Shamanic drumming med-
itation. Relaxing, simple movements,
breath techniques to relieve pain,
more.
❏ June Schedule
• Yoga: Mon., 6:30 p.m.; Wed., 10:30
a.m.; Thurs., 7:15 p.m.; Sat., 9:30 a.m.
No class June 16. Multi-level, begin-
ners and intermediate. Hatha Yoga
postures, Pranayam, deep relaxation.
$11.
• Meditation: Mon., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs.,
6 p.m. Pranayam/mantra meditation.
No experience necessary. $11.
Sheri Pilates Studio (703
Market St., Kingston, 570.331.0531)
• Beginner mat class: Tues., 5 p.m.
$50/10 classes.
• Equipment classes on reformer
and tower: $150/10 classes.
• Private training available on
reformer, cadillac, stability chair,
ladder barrel, cardiolates on reboun-
der.
Call studio for additional mat class/
equipment class schedule, all classes
taught by certified instructors.
Spine & SportCare (Old Forge,
570.451.1122)
• Pilates Mat Classes: Mon. 9:30
a.m.; Wed. noon; Thurs. 5:30 p.m.;
Yoga Flow: Tues. 5:30 p.m. $10/class,
$45/5 classes.
• Small Group Personal Training:
Personalized program changes w/
every session, similar to P90X cross-
fit. All levels, call for details.
Studio Brick (118 Walnut St.,
Danville, 570.275.3240)
• All Levels Yoga: Wed. (ongoing),
10-11 a.m.
Thetravelingyogi@ya-
hoo.com Individual attention for
physical/spiritual advancement. All
levels welcome. Call 570.709.2406 for
info. Classes held at The Studio at 32
(32 Forrest St., Wilkes-Barre) Sat.,
10:30 a.m.-noon.
The Vintage Theater (119 Penn
Avenue, Scranton, 570.589.0271,
www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
• The Ellen Doyle Dance Experience:
Tues., 8-10 p.m., ft. strength training,
cardio, stretching, dance warm-up
classics. Free and open to the public,
wear dance shoes/socks, bring yoga
mat/water.
Waering Stained Glass Stu-
dio (336 N. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre).
• Tarot Card Readings: $50/first half
hour, $10 additional. Appointment
only. Call 570.417.5020.
White Dragon Internal
Strength Chi Kung (330 Sandra
Dr., Jefferson Twp & Scranton,
570.906.9771) Tai chi, yoga, med-
itation, chi kung, white lotus, pai lum,
flowing water, inner tiger. Beginners-
advanced. Mon.-Fri., open 6 a.m.-10
p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Private and group. Any ages.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA events
(570.823.2191)
• Zumbatomic: Sat., 1 p.m. $16/8
week session for YMCA members,
$20/non-members. Designed for ages
7-12, now offering parent class. Pre-
registration required.
• Camp Kresge: Father/Son: Session
2, June 15-17, 5 p.m., check in, 11 a.m.,
departure YMCA Kresge. Download
registration form at campkres-
ge.com, send to Camp Registrar,
Rose Warner, Family YMCA of Easton,
Phillipsburg and Vicinity, 1225 West
Lafayette St., Easton, PA, 18042. Info:
570.823.2191 ext. 152, mcelhin-
ney@wbymca.org.
The Yoga Studio (210 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming, 570.301.7544)
• Yoga: Mon., 9:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.;
Wed., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs., 9:30 a.m.,
6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m.
• Zumba: Tues., 5:30 p.m.; Wed. 9
a.m., 7 p.m.; Fri., 5:30 p.m.
YMCA of Greater Pittston (10
N Main St, Pittston, 570.655.2255 ext.
104, mlabagh@greaterpittstonym-
ca.org)
• Early Tikes Gymnastics: Wed.,
9-9:30 a.m. $30.
• Just 3’s: Wed., 9:45-10:15 a.m. $30.
• Twinkie Fitness: Thurs., 5:15-6 p.m.,
$30. Age 4.
• Beginner Gymnastics: Young
beginner (ages 5-7), Sat., 9-9:45 a.m.;
beginner (ages 7+), Sat., 10-10:45 a.m.;
intermediate (ages 10+), Sat., 11 a.m.-
noon. $40/member, $30/family
member, $55/non-members.
• Basketball: Beginner (kindergar-
ten, grades1-2), Tues., 5:30- 6:15 p.m.
• Basketball Basics: (grades 3-5)
Tues., 6:30-7:30 p.m. $50/members,
$40/family member, $65/non-mem-
bers.
• Basketball and Softball: Tee Ball
(ages 5-6), Sat., 9-9:45 a.m.; pre-
minors baseball (ages 7-10), Sat., 10-11
a.m.; pre-minors softball (ages 7-10),
Sat., 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., $50/members,
$40/family members, $65/non-
members.
• Summer Palooza 2012: June 20,
6-10 p.m., The Open Space (73 S. Main
St., Pittston). $35. Cash bar, catering
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 42
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 38
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I
n an era where economic
stresses and the recession has
left some salons struggling
and salon owners scratch-
ing their heads as to how to
cope, Mountain Top’s Impressa
Salon has continued to prosper as it
enters its sixth year in business.
According to owner-stylist Kim
Smiga, who herself is a King’s
College graduate with a degree
in Marketing and Business, says,
“The salon’s continued success and
growing reputation in the Moun-
tain Top/Wilkes-Barre /Scranton
area has been very simple, we’ve
built this business making people
look and feel amazing, and when
they are happy with the services
provided, they come back! My
team and I continue to offer great
services in a beautiful environment
and we treat people well. We offer
a wide range of beauty services for
men and women with an empha-
sis on haircoloring and precision
haircutting.”
The salon’s Education Coor-
dinator and Master Stylist, Tony
Dorso agrees. “Our client base has
doubled in size over the past two
years. The client, male or female,
is looking for a combination of
expertise and comfort in the salon
environment. We have combined a
contemporary, upscale, yet family
friendly environment, so that every-
one is comfortable here.”
A30 year veteran of the salon
business, Dorso spent his first 15
years in the Allentown / Lehigh
Valley market as owner of two of
the top salons in that area, and then
another 8 years in New York City
working for London based Toni &
Guy. Dorso knows all too well the
need to not only be competitive in
the ever changing salon market, but
to constantly keep one up on the
competition by virtue of continued
training for himself, owner Smiga,
and their team. “Competition is
fierce so you need to be on your
game, and a great part of that is
not just the salon environment and
overall persona that you project,
but the quality of the staff that you
hire, and their ability to provide top
notch service to a valued clientele”,
says Dorso.
In addition, both Smiga and Dor-
so juggle their busy salon schedule
with other industry involvements
as educators. Smiga works for the
Redken 5th Avenue, New York
City, and Dorso for Iden Interna-
tional, Long Beach, California.
Both facilitate new techniques and
mentor stylists and salon owners
across the country. “As educators
we are able to learn the latest tech-
niques and bring new ideas back to
the salon, which allows our team to
offer new ideas to our clients,” says
Dorso.
“It’s a bit of a balancing act –we
stay busy”, says Smiga, “Our sa-
lon’s educational goals are focused
on providing top notch education
for our entire team. In turn, our
team is knowledgeable and con-
fident to provide quality services.
Natural talent, passion, a love for
people, and a phenomenal attitude
are what it takes to be successful in
this industry. Pair those qualities
with thousands of dollars invested
in education and you have yourself
an in demand hairstylist.”
True to that commitment of
hiring like-minded and forward
thinking stylists, Smiga brought
on board 25 year old colorist and
stylist Maria Bernazzoli, a native of
the Pittsburgh area. Maria has been
training with Redken Educators on
a monthly basis and recently spent
three days in NYC training with
world renowned educators Martin
Parsons and Nick Arrojo. Her
dedication to learning has been key
in her overall success at Impressa
Salon. “Some hairstylists enter this
business and struggle to develop
their skills, and others are naturals,”
says Tony, Kim adds, “Maria is one
of those naturals, especially with
hair color and highlighting skill,
she has an eye for color and a natu-
ral way of making the salon guests
feel comfortable in her chair.”
Our newest and most popular
services are spray tanning, hair dia-
monds, gel nail polish and Shape
Control—Redken’s newest smooth-
ing and straightening system.
The spray tanning system offered
at Impressa Salon was recently
voted the #1 spray tan solution
among the competition. Spray tan-
ning is great for men and women
who want a bronzed look without
exposure to unhealthy UV rays.
The unique blend is formulated
with the highest quality of ingre-
dients that are virtually odor-free
and moisturizing to the skin. Unlike
other spray tanning products, this
award winning formula provides
a golden glow that lasts up to ten
days. Also, the tanning solution can
be customized for different skin
tones: Fair Skin, Medium Skin, and
Dark or Olive skin.
Another new trend offered at
Impressa Salon is Hair Diamonds.
The high quality crystals are ap-
plied to the hair using heat and
when cared for properly will last up
to two weeks. The result is a strand
of diamonds that create bling and
sparkle to any look.
Gel Polish remains very popular
among manicure goers because of
its astonishing staying power. The
polish lasts 2-3 weeks, strengthens
natural nails, and provides a mirror
like finish. Also, the gel-based pol-
ish uses a revolutionary technique
to dry the polish instantly, so
drying time and smudging polish is
never an issue. In fact, most women
prefer the natural look and feel of
the gel nail polish over other nail
enhancements.
Shape Control by Redken is
the newest and most technologi-
cally advanced smoothing and curl
reducing system the industry has
the offer. It’s safe, formaldehyde
free, and leaves hair silky, shiny
and manageable. Shape Control
provides two service options, the
first option offers the ability to
smooth and seal the hair while
reducing curl and frizz. The second
option renders a permanent result
which will completely eliminate
waves and curls.
Another frizz reducing and
smoothing treatment offered is The
Brazilian Keratin Treatment which
is unparalleled in its ability to leave
the hair soft and conditioned for up
to 12 weeks. The Keratin Treatment
has been the most controversial in-
novation that the salon industry has
seen in the past 5 years and has also
seen the most explosive growth.
The process takes about two and a
half hours but our clients claim it is
worth the wait to have manageable
and frizz-free hair.
With summer in full bloom and
both sun and chlorine revving up
to take a toll on the hair, Impressa
Salon has added a tier of services
specifically formulated to strength-
en weak hair and eliminate chlorine
from the hair--inevitable damage
that comes with the season.
The demand for these services
will be on the rise, especially with
everyone craving new looks for the
summer season. Everyone is invited
to visit Impressa Salon so they can
help you meet all your hair care and
beauty needs. Consultations are al-
ways complimentary and highly en-
couraged. Consultations are a great
way to meet a new stylist and talk
about a new look before making a
commitment. Appointments can
be made by calling 570.474.5150.
Walk-ins are always welcome!
Also, for more information visit us
at impressasalon.com.
Impressa Salon Enters its SixthYear in Business
Pedi &
Mani
Special
Spray
Tanning
Special
“Try Me”
Haircut
Special
Top of the Mountain Plaza
130 N. Mountain Blvd. Mountain Top
570-474-5150
$32 $22 $25
advertorial
Impressa Salon Impressa Salon
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o sooner did Julianne
Hough graduate from
high school in Sandy,
Utah, than she hopped in her
beater of a Subaru and drove
to Los Angeles.
She had $2,000 in her
pocket, but fibbed to her
father and told him she’d
saved up $5,000. Her rent
was $800 a month, so she
knew she had to land a job
quickly before her nest egg
was history.
As if her situation wasn’t
stressful enough, Hough’s
roommates were all drop-
dead gorgeous models who
barely had to lift a finger to
rake in the cash.
“They’d get checks for,
like, $10,000 and not have to
work for the rest of the
month,” recalls Hough with a
laugh. “And I’d be out work-
ing my butt off auditioning
and taking classes. When I’d
leave in the morning, they’d
all be sitting around in their
pajamas, and when I’d get
home at night, they’d still be
sitting around in their paja-
mas.
“I’d call up my mom and
dad and go, ‘Why couldn’t I
be 6-foot-1? But I kept perse-
vering, and eventually it all
worked out OK.”
Indeed, Hough only spent
about a month pounding the
pavements before she wound
up as a hoofer on the ABC
game show, “Show Me The
Money.” By the end of 2006,
she joined the cast of “Danc-
ing With the Stars.” She won
the contest twice and netted
Emmy nominations in 2008
and 2009 for her choreog-
raphy on the show.
After she left the reality
series, Hough set her sights
on movies and scored a num-
ber of high-profile jobs, in-
cluding a supporting part
opposite Cher in “Burlesque”
and the leading role in the
2011 “Footloose” remake.
Now, she anchors “Rock of
Ages,” the big-screen adapta-
tion of the still-running
Broadway smash which
opened in 2005 and earned
five Tony Awards.
Hough stars as Sherrie, a
small-town girl who arrives
in Los Angeles circa 1987
looking to make it in show
business and winds up falling
hard for Drew (Diego Bone-
ta), a Sunset Strip bartender
who also has dreams of star-
dom. Their rock ’n’ roll ro-
mance is told through the
hits of Foreigner, Journey,
Def Leppard, REO Speed-
wagon, Poison, Pat Benatar,
Bon Jovi and Twisted Sister,
among others.
The supporting cast in-
cludes Russell Brand, Mary J.
Blige, Paul Giamatti, Cathe-
rine Zeta Jones, Alec Bald-
win, Malin Akerman and, as
rock god Stacee Jaxx, Tom
Cruise.
There are cameos in the
movie by a wide array of
’80s hitmakers, including
Sebastian Bach of Skid Row,
Debbie Gibson, Nuno Be-
ttencourt of Extreme, Night
Ranger’s Joel Hoekstra and
REO Speedwagon’s Kevin
Cronin. Members of Def
Leppard paid a visit to the
set for Cruise’s interpretation
of their hit, “Pour Some Sug-
ar on Me.” Rocker Lita Ford
also stopped by the Miami
soundstage where the movie
was being shot and brought
along some of her vintage
stage outfits as gifts.
“I wore one of her corsets
in the movie, which was very
cool,” says Hough, 23.
Hough’s boyfriend, Ryan
Seacrest, was another fre-
quent visitor. Asked if the
“American Idol” emcee gave
her any advice about how to
rock out, Hough says, “He’s a
businessman and so not a
rock star. I mean, in my head
and heart, he’s a rock star.
But he’s just the most clean-
cut, clean-shaven guy I know.
“But he was there to root
me on. I feel like a lucky girl
because he was so motivating
and encouraging. It might
have been a little awkward to
do the make-out scene in
front of my boyfriend, but he
understands it’s just work.”
Before production began,
director Adam Shankman
(“Hairspray”) sent members
of his cast to rock-star col-
lege where they underwent
vocal training, dance rehears-
als and physical conditioning.
For Hough, whose debut
country album hit the charts
at No. 1 in 2008, the tough-
est part was losing the nat-
ural twang in her voice.
“I had a vocal coach
named Ron Anderson, who
trained Axl Rose back in the
day,” she says. “My range
grew so much. I learned how
to do some scream/growls
without killing my vocal
chords.”
Hough admits she wasn’t
the biggest fan of hair metal
going into “Rock of Ages,”
but she left the production
with a respect for all things
’80s.
“The melodies from those
songs are what really make
them so iconic and classic,”
she says. “I’m not dogging
on non-melodic pop music
because I love it. But the
(songs in the movie) are
timeless because they have
strong melodies.”
In the movie, Sherrie hits a
detour on her rode to star-
dom and winds up pole-danc-
ing at the Venus Gentleman’s
Club, a strip joint overseen
by a no-nonsense manager
named Justice (Blige).
Learning how to strut her
stuff was a challenge for
Hough.
“I thought I was going to
be doing a lot of bumping
and grinding on a pole. But I
came to find out was that
what you really need is upper
body strength.
“After I did those scenes,
my arms were totally ripped.
But I’m no pole specialist. I
can’t believe some of those
girls in the movie who, like,
walk up and down and back-
wards on the pole — and
they’re only hanging on by
one hand. That’s absolutely
incredible.
“Afterwards, I had bruises
everywhere, especially all
along my inner thighs. And
lots of sore muscles.”
One scene proved too hot
for audiences to handle.
While singing “Rock You
Like A Hurricane,” Hough
performed a lap dance on
Cruise. Preview audiences
reportedly disliked the se-
quence so much that Shank-
man opted to cut it from the
film.
“It was so freakin’ badass,”
Hough says of the number.
“It was, like, the sexiest,
roughest performance in the
movie. And I think it was a
little bit too much for people
… Women, especially, didn’t
really like Sherrie after that.
So, they cut it out. But it
will be on DVD, for sure.” W
Hough is ready to 'Rock'
By Amy Longsdorf
Weekender Correspondent
Julianne Hough is Sherrie Christian in ‘Rock of Ages,’
which is based on the musical of the same name
Sherrie, with her love interest Drew Boley (played by
Diego Boneta) in a scene from the film
“I thought I was going to be doing a lot of
bumping and grinding on a pole. But I
came to find out was that what you really
need is upper body strength.”
Julianne Hough
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by Palazzo 53. Hosted by Sam San-
guedolce, Michael Lombardo, Dion
Fernandes. Good 2 Go duo. Compli-
mentary babysitting offered at Y, 6-9
p.m. Reservations recommended, call
or visit greaterpittstonymca.org by
June 18.
Zumba Fitness Classes
• Mon./Wed., 5:15 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m., at
TLC Fitness Center (bottom of Mor-
gan Hwy., Scranton). $5/class. Call
570.558.7293 for info.
• Adult classes held at Fitwize 4
Kids Tues./Thurs., 7:15, Sun., 11 a.m. on
Keyser Ave. across from Keyser Oak
Shopping Center Call 348.9383 for
info.
OUTSIDE
Cedar BMX (Red Barn Village
Road, Clarks Summit, cedarbmx.com,
570.855.8191)
• Olympic Day BMX Race: June 23,
registration 5-6:30 p.m. Free BMX
racing.
Frances SlocumState Park
(565 Mt. Olivet Road, Wyoming,
570.696.9105)
• Turtle Walk & Talk: June 16, 2-3
p.m. Meet in gravel parking lot at
bottom of campground road.
• Natural Symbols of PA: June 16,
7-8 p.m. Campground amphitheater.
• Riverfest: June 23, noon-8 p.m.
Food, crafts for kids, animals.
Lacawac Sanctuary (94 Sanc-
tuary Rd., Lake Ariel, 570.689.9494,
director@lacawac.org)
❏ Music in the Forest Series:
• Burden on Society: June 23
Lackawanna Audubon Socie-
ty
• Bird walk on Dr. Doug Sheldon’s
property in Susquehanna County:
June 16, 9 a.m. Take 81 North to Exit
211 Lenox, meet in parking lot of
Bingham’s Restaurant. Breakfast,
meet restaurant 7:45 a.m. Info:
570.254.9895
• Bird banding demonstration: June
23, Lacawac Sanctuary. Info:
570.241.3031, robert.smith@scran-
ton.edu
Lackawanna Heritage Valley
(LHVA.org)
• Heritage Explorer Bike Tour and
Festival: June 16, Mellow Park, Peck-
ville. Festival 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
National Trails Day Events:
• Back Mountain Trail Association
Annual National Trails Day Bike Ride:
June 23, meet 9:30 a.m. Dallas High
School. Easy 10-mile downhill ride
(one way). Beginners welcome. End
at RiverFest, Nesbitt Park, Kingston.
Wear helmet. Responsible for shut-
tle/ride back. Info: 570.430.0912,
dentist@handleys.net
Nescopeck State Park (1137
Honey Hole Rd., Drums,
570.403.2006) All events free, unless
noted otherwise. Reservations re-
quired.
• Morning Bird Walk: June 16, 8-10
a.m. Dress accordingly. Binoculars
recommended. Registration required.
North Branch Land Trust
• Walking Tour of Orchid Bog: June
24, 9 a.m., 1:30 p.m., Valmont Bog (S.
Church St., Hazleton). Free/NBLT
members, $10/guests. Registration
required. Info: nblt.org, info@nblt.org,
570.696.5545
Salt Springs State Park
(Montrose, 570.967.7275, www.friend-
sofsaltspringspark.org)
To register for classes, call
570.833.4034
• Sunday Meditations: June 24, 1
p.m. Fee.
Scranton Ghost Walk (Scran-
tonGhostTours.com, 570.383.1821)
• Daily, 90-minute tours, usually
7:30 p.m., 9 p.m. $20/adults, $15/
under 11. Rain or shine. Reservations
required. Secret meeting place
divulged upon reservation. Daytime
walks available on limited basis. Call
to reserve.
Wallenpaupack Scenic Boat
Tour 11 a.m.-6 p.m., $14/regular,
$13/senior, $10/12 and under. Cele-
brating 50th year on the lake with
daily one-hour cruises. Info:
570.226.3293, wallenpaupackboat-
tour.com.
SOCIAL GROUPS
Alcohol Anonymous: Mon./Fri 7
p.m. (373 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre),
Tue. 7 p.m. (25 Church St., Wilkes-
Barre), Wed. 10:15 a.m. (301 Shoemaker
St., Swoyersville), 7 p.m. (1000 E.
Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre), 8 p.m.
(562 Wyoming Ave., Kingston), Thurs.
10 a.m. (75 S. Prospect St., Nanti-
coke), 7:30 p.m. (301 Lake St., Dallas),
Fri. 7:30 p.m. (Triangle 24 Hour Club,
Dallas), Sat. 7:30 p.m. (1003 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort), Sun. 7 p.m. (128 W.
Washington St., Nanticoke). Call
570.288.9892 for info.
American Wicca & The Garb
Wench (americanwicca.org)
• Tarot Readings by High Priest
Thane Amdor: By appointment Tues.,
Thurs., Sat. Bring friend, get free
reading. To schedule, call
570.793.4095
Beehive Area Narcotics
Anonymous (Wilkes-Barre-King-
ston-Nanticoke-Mountaintop) 24 hour
phone line: 570.654.7755 or
1.866.935.4762.
Food Addicts Anonymous
Meetings (St. Vincent DePaul
Church, Scranton: 570.344.7866)
Meetings every Fri. night, 8 p.m.
Monroe County Garden Club
• Looking for gardens to feature in
2013 Garden Tour. Stroudsburg/East
Stroudsburg area, gardens will be
evaluated in June. Contact Sheila
Bortree at 570.629.0279 for info.
Nar-Anon Family Group
Meetings Sun. 7 p.m. Clear Brook
Bldg. (rear), Forty Fort; Wed., 7 p.m.
United Methodist Church, Mountain-
top. 570.288.9892.
NEPA BlogCon (nepablog-
con.com)
• Launch Party: June 22, 5-7 p.m.,
The River Grille (570 N. River St.,
Plains) Free admission.
• Networking Event: Sept. 29, all
day, Luzerne County Community
College. $35, proceeds benefit The
Arc of Luzerne County, NEPA Veter-
ans Multicare Alliance.
The NEPA Rainbow Alliance
(www.gaynepa.com)
• As part of the NEPA SafeZone
Project, NEPA RA is creating an “It
Gets Better” video. Video features
local representatives from the LGBT
community, allies and more offering
words of encouragement. To be a
sponsor, e-mail itgetsbetter@gayne-
pa.com; to be in the video, visit
gaynepa.com for details/application.
• NEPA PrideFest Pageant: July 8,
The Colonnade (401 Jefferson Ave.,
Scranton).
Oakwood Terrace (400 Gleason
Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171 ext. 116 or 101)
• Support Group Meetings: third
Wed. of each month, 6:30 p.m.
Suicide Bereavement Sup-
port Group First/Third Thurs.
every month, 7 p.m., at Catholic
Social Services (33 E. Northampton
St., Wilkes-Barre). Call 570.822.7118
ext. 307 for info.
Wyoming Valley Home
School Network A support
group for home school or cyber
school parents throughout NEPA
providing monthly meetings, field
trips, park days, more. Visit wvhsnet-
work.webs.com or contact Julie
Lemardy at jmlemardy@gmail.com
for info. W
- compiled by Alexa Cholewa,
Weekender Intern
Send your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA18703 or fax to 570.831.7375
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 39
sorry mom&dad
By Justin Brown
Weekender Correspondent
A
t 3:29 p.m. on
Friday afternoon,
my plans for the
weekend were still up in
the air. By 3:30 p.m., I
was searching my room
for clean underwear to
take with me on a last-
minute road trip with a
girl I met on a game
show.
“Let’s go on a road
trip!” suggested a girl I
was on “I Survived A
Japanese Game Show”
with over an unexpected
phone call. She was
breathing heavily and
typing so loudly in the
background that it
sounded like she was in
a violent domestic dis-
pute with her keyboard.
That’s why I’ll be re-
ferring to her as Xanax
in this story because she
clearly needs to be
prescribed some!
“I have to go to Pittsburgh this
weekend to sign my lease so I
can go back to school,” I ex-
plained.
“Let’s make it a road trip. I’m
leaving Connecticut in 30 min-
utes to pick you up!” Xanax said.
When she picked me up, Xa-
nax insisted I buckle up. “If I’m
going to drink and drive, you’re
wearing a seatbelt.” She then
cracked open a Four Loko.
We had a blast Friday night
and partied our asses off with my
new roommate. I woke up on
Saturday feeling gross and des-
perately wanted a Tic Tac and a
water balloon to throw at myself
so I could freshen up.
Xanax told me she told me she
cried herself to sleep, revealing
the reason she needed this last-
minute road trip was to get away
from home. Apparently, she
caught her father in an affair, told
her mom and now her parents are
getting divorced.
For the rest the day, she was
unstable. One minute she was
shaking and staring into the
distance, the next she was happy.
She had a nervous breakdown
the next morning at 4:30 a.m.,
waking me up in tears saying she
wanted to leave. She then ran to
her car as if she were being
chased by a rapist and left me
stranded 327 miles from home!
With no bus leaving for Scran-
ton, I had to take the bus to Phi-
ladelphia and stay with my buddy
Morgis. On my ride to Philly, I
thought maybe being stranded
was a sign I wasn’t meant to go
back to school. Thanks to a
message on hip-hop flavored
potato chips called Rap Snacks
that I found at Morgis’ house,
which read “Stay in School,” I
realized I should still go back.
Sure, the scenario was nuts, but
when life gets crazy, at least you
know you’re alive! W
Never take a road
trip with someone
you meet on a
game show
Justin got a bit of wisdom from
this package of snacks. True
story.
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motorhead
Ride of
the Week
By Michael Golubiewski
Special to the Weekender
To submit your vehicle,
email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
1968
BUICK SKYLARK
Owner:
Bill Norton of Old Forge
“This is a heavy car,” Norton says.
“It almost feels like I’m driving a tank
when I’m driving around in it — it has
a lot of metal. It was rusted out when I
took ownership. I’ve restored it inside
and outside. It took a few years, but
the fnished product is worth it.” W
show us some skin
Name: Kristina Groover
Town: Scranton
E-mail a photo of your tattoo (at least 200 dpi) with your full name,
address and phone number to weekender@theweekender.com to
enter our weekly contest. Each month, Weekender readers vote for their
favorite, and the winner receives a $75 gift certificate to Marc’s Tattooing.
Must be 18 to participate
HOWTO ENTER:
sponsored by
Last month’s winner:
Brianna Spak of Sugar Notch
NEPATATTOO.COM
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“Happiness is a Summer Breeze”
King’s Deck
Happy Hour Monday - Friday 5-7pm
14 Beers On Tap
$2 Landshark Drafts On Saturdays
King’s Deck
49 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountaintop • 474-5464
Sunday, June 17
CHIXY DIX 9 PM-1AM
Wednesday, June 20
MIKE WEYRAUCH 9 PM-1AM
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Kelly wears a yellow sundress
from A. Buyer and high heels from
Bakers Shoes.
Kelly is wearing a blue fower-print
dress from Abercrombie & Fitch and
pink strappy heels from Nine West.
This white silk dress is from bebe
and the nude high heels are from
Carlos’n Charlie’s.
This cotton strapless dress is from
Express while the heels are from
Rampel.
Style files
By Rachel A. Pugh
Weekender General Manager
Playing dress up
Photos by Rachel A. Pugh
K
elly Ann Pisano has a
hard time parting with her
clothes. Aself-proclaimed
“packrat” when it comes
to tops, this 27 year
old from Pittston Twp. has a fear of
prematurely departing with attire that
someday — just someday — she might
want to sport.
Afan of feminine dresses and solid
bargains, Kelly knows how to keep her
outfits looking soft yet sexy. Always
looking for an excuse to dress up, Kelly
makes for a perfect Style Pick of the
Week.
Favorite place to shop: Express.
Favorite accessory: My cross
necklace, it goes with everything.
Favorite brand name: I do not
have one favorite designer. My closet
is filled with a variety, but I will say if
I had tons of disposable cash, I would
head on over to bebe. They have some
awesome dresses.
WEEKENDER: How would you
describe your look?
PISANO: I like to feel sexy, yet
sophisticated, and sometimes just
downright elegant. I love wearing
outfits that can be incorporated into
everyday life but can be turned into a
fancy night out with the addition of a
necklace or just a different pair of shoes.
Everywhere I go is an opportunity to
wear a dress! Not only are they comfy
and lightweight in the summer, they
ooze femininity and cuteness.
WEEKENDER: What kind of
clothing do you own the most of?
PISANO: I own a lot of shirts … I am
kind of a packrat with them. I probably
have close to 200 shirts and sweaters.
The worst part is I just keep buying new
ones. I am a sucker for cheap, awesome-
looking clothes. I refuse to pay too much
for clothes and, most of the time, never
buy anything at retail price. I never feel
good in something I know I overpaid
for!
WEEKENDER: If you could redo
your entire wardrobe, what would
you fll your closet with?
PISANO: Marilyn Monroe’s style.
She had an amazing figure, and her
clothes definitely showed off her curves
in an elegant and sexy manner.
WEEKENDER: What is one item
of clothing you’d never part with?
PISANO: I have these blue leopard-
print high heels that I wear a lot! They
fit me perfectly, and they make me
feel fabulous. I wear them with jeans,
dresses, just about everything.
WEEKENDER: How do you go
about choosing your outft for the
day?
PISANO: I guess it just depends
on how I feel. The better I feel in the
morning, the more enthusiastic I am
about dressing up. Sometimes I just
wake up in the morning and know what I
want to wear. Each outfit has a different
feeling attached to it, some days I’m
relaxed while others I’m just dying to
get dressed up!
WEEKENDER: Do you have any
fashion pet peeves?
PISANO: Too tight clothing and
shirts and shorts with ridiculous sayings
on them.
WEEKENDER: What do you feel
you look best in?
PISANO: Dresses that have a tighter
fitting bodice and a flared lower portion.
I feel as though these types of dresses
really accentuate the hips.
WEEKENDER: What’s your
favorite comfy outft?
PISANO: I love the gym and going
for bike rides with my boyfriend, so
most of the time I am in my yoga pants
and tank tops. The Express yoga pants
seem to be the best fitting for my body
type.
WEEKENDER: When did you
start to develop your own sense
of style?
PISANO: In high school, I always
got dressed up. Getting dressed up every
morning was the driving force to waking
up to go to school sometimes. I actually
still own a lot of the clothes I bought
in high school and even as far back as
middle school. I never like to get rid of
clothes because you never know when
you’re going to want to finally wear that
shirt you thought was hideous.
WEEKENDER: If you could shop
anywhere in the world, where
would it be?
PISANO: Australia has some
awesome clothes. I used to live there in
college. They have a store for every type
of style with very reasonable prices. The
weather is always nice, too, so dresses
are on sale all year round! W
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A
seemingly old-fashioned
hobby is becoming no-
ticeably more popular in
today’s society. With local in-
terest groups, a social network-
ing site and a world-wide event,
knitting is making its way back
into modern-day lifestyles.
The Knit and Crochet Group
hosted by the Osterhout Free
Library in Wilkes-Barre had
originally started out as a club
only for teens. During the few
years that the program has been
around, it has evolved from
targeting a specific age group to
a club that is intergenerational.
Alissa Lukasavage, the teen
librarian at the Osterhout, is the
relatively new coordinator of the
Knit and Crochet Group. Even
though she is new to the posi-
tion, she has always been
around lending her helping
hand.
During their bi-weekly meet-
ings held on Saturday mornings,
Lukasavage enjoys the time she
spends with the members of her
group, which consists of a total
of 25 knitters of all different
ages and skill levels. The
amount of members who attend
the meetings vary.
“It’s just a time where knitters
can get together, talk to each
other and, of course, as we’re
talking the conversation always
strays,” she said. “Everybody
laughs, and we talk about differ-
ent things. It’s really a good
time.”
Lukasavage is surprised to see
how well-liked knitting has
become and how people of all
ages are becoming interested in
this hobby.
“With popular web-
sites such as Etsy, I
believe that knitting
is becoming more
relevant in to-
day’s society,”
she said. “The idea of some-
thing being handmade is becom-
ing alluring to people; they’re
like, ‘Oh, I want something
handmade.’”
Another website that is be-
coming popular in the knitting
world is Ravelry.com, a social-
networking site that knitters
keep track of information and
look for ideas and inspiration.
“It’s kind of like Facebook,
you know, but it’s just for knit-
ters. I just think it’s really cool.
I actually signed up not too
long ago,” Lukasavage ex-
plained.
In 2005, Danielle Landes
created an event called World
Wide Knit in Public Day
(WWKiP), which will be cele-
brated at the Osterhout Saturday,
June 16. The day began as a
way for people to get together
as they are knitting. Instead of
everyone sitting alone in front
of the television, this was the
perfect opportunity to get up,
get out and engage with other
knitters.
Elaine Stefanko, head of the
information services department
at the Osterhout, was the one
who decided to introduce this
event to the area last year. After
seeing how well everything
went, Stefanko decided to make
this an annual event. She want-
ed to have the knitters get in-
volved and have a fun way of
getting people together.
During any day between the
second Saturday and the third
Sunday in June, this event has
increased its popularity each
year. WWKiP has been hosted
in many countries such as Aus-
tralia, China, Norway, France,
England, United States and
others.
Lukasavage talked about how
she thought the idea that Da-
nielle Landes came up with was
a great concept.
“Usually people don’t get
together when you are knitting
or crocheting. If people get
together, you might find out
people knit that you didn’t know
about.”
This year at the WWKiP
event, Lukasavage is very opti-
mistic that it will be a great
way of sparking interest in the
Knit and Crochet Group at the
Osterhout. She hopes that peo-
ple of all ages will see how
much fun the group has together
and will be interested in joining.
“It’s such a rewarding experi-
ence to make something with
your hands,” she said excitedly.
“It’s spreading the word about
knitting, that it’s still alive today
and people around here are
interested in it.” W
World Wide Knit in Public Day,
Sat., June 16, 10:30 a.m.-noon,
Osterhout Free Library (71 S.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre).
Info: wwkipday.com,
570.821.1959
A close-knit group
By Alexa Cholewa
Weekender Intern
Knitters take part in last year’s World Wide Knit in
Public Day at the Osterhout Free Library.
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Melissa

s Mind
Rock Of Ages! Movie
looks awesome! And
if any other rock fans
call you a sissymary for
liking a musical, just
show them pictures of
the dudes from the 80s
who wrote those songs
in the frst place.
Lissa of KRZ has a lot on
her mind, and she needs
to speak it. Check out the
Weekender every week
to read her deep thoughts
and philosophical
approach to life.
For more of Melissa’s wisdom, follow her on Facebook and read her blog.
facebook.com/melissakrahnke • 985krz.com/Lissa/11276840
Mountaingrown
Music
Weekender/Mountaingrown
Original Music Series
SUPPORTING LOCAL MUSIC
... LIKE NEVER BEFORE
WEDNESDAY
6/13/12
at the Woodlands
no cover
Performance by:
Bret Alexander
Live radio broadcast from 10-11 p.m.
on 102.3-FM, The Mountain
Hosted by Alan K. Stout
weekender
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PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
KINGSTON 570.714.2323
close up
KAYLA CZAPRACKI
WITH THE MODEL OF THE WEEK
BEFORE
HAIR AND MAKEUP
PROVIDED BY
SAPPHIRE SALON AND DAY SPA
WARDROBE PROVIDED BY
BRATTY NATTY’S
BOUTIQUE
I
t wouldbe difficult toargue that
cancer is one of the most devas-
tatingdiseases onour planet,
affectingmillions eachandevery
year. Organizations like the Amer-
icanCancer Societyare doing
everythingit cantoraise awareness
andfunds for cancer treatments,
andone wayit does sois byholding
community-sponsoredRelayFor
Life events throughout the country.
The WyomingValleyis holding
its15thRelayFor Life fromSat-
urday, June16at 10a.m. toSunday,
June17at 10a.m. at King’s Col-
lege’s Betzler Fields inWilkes-
Barre Twp. toencourage all who
have beenaffectedbycancer in
some waytotake part andjointhe
fight.
“The event is 24hours because
cancer never sleeps, andsomeone
whohas it battles it 24hours a day,”
explainedSara Klinges, media/
online chair of the event. “Partici-
pants will campout at the site and
take turns walkingor jogging
aroundthe trackwhile raisingfunds
andawareness of all The American
Cancer Societydoes.”
RelayFor Life beganin1985and
has growneachyear withmillions
of people involvedandmillions of
dollars raised, savingmillions of
lives across the globe. Local volun-
teers anddonors have made a big
impact savingthousands of lives in
NEPAalone. It is because of them
that the WyomingValleycommit-
tee hopes toraise $134,500this
year.
“Tobe a part of Relay, people can
joinanexistingteam, formtheir
ownteamor just come the dayof
the event andtake part inthe activ-
ities andcontribute tothe team’s
fundraisinggoals bypurchasingthe
items theywill be sellingor just
make a straight donationtothe
team,” saidKlinges. “Comingto
the mainevent itself will give peo-
ple a reallygreat idea of what Relay
is all about. Evenif theydon’t form
a teamthis year, theycansee what
happens there andtalktothe teams
about their experiences andmaybe
forma teamfor next year’s event.”
This year’s event has a unique
theme torecognize the caregivers
of those withthe disease andthe
donors whose generosityallows the
AmericanCancer Societytofund
researchandprograms for cancer
patients andsurvivors. Committee
members decidedthat “Be a Hero,
BringHope, Save Lives” was the
perfect choice torepresent these
heroes.
“We hope this inspires everyone,
not just cancer patients andsurvi-
vors, to‘be a hero’ andget involved
inour event because we hope
somedaytohave a worldwithno
cancer,” saidKlinges. “We want to
showthat youdon’t have tobe
superherotobe a herointhe fight
against cancer …Relayis the
perfect waytodothat.”
RelayFor Life features more
thanthe actual relay, includinga
varietyof family-friendlyevents
like a heroOlympics, a boxcar
event calledthe “RoadtoRecov-
ery,” a luminaria, musical perform-
ances, giant moonbounce chal-
lenges, a “Hope Wall” anda can-
cer-survivor dinner onsite. W
Relay For Life of Wyoming
Valley, Sat. June 16-17, 10
a.m.-10 a.m., King’s College
Robert Betzler Fields (221
Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-
Barre Twp.). Info: relayfor-
life.org/pawyomingvalley, 570.
562.9749.
Fighting cancer
one local hero at a time
Above and below, scenes from last year’s Wyoming
Valley Relay for Life.
By Noelle Vetrosky
Weekender Correspondent
“To be a part of Relay, people can join
an existing team, form their own team
or just come the day of the event and take
part in the activities and contribute to the
team’s fundraising goals.”
Sara Klinges, media/online chair of Wyoming Valley Relay for Life
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tell us...
What’s your favorite
bazaar/picnic food?
Brandon
Sauers
27, Allentown
“Waffle ice-cream
sandwiches.”
Crystal
Smith
18, Wilkes-Barre
“Cheese fries.”
Jacki
Lukas
22, Kingston
“Funnel cake.”
Jen
Miller
25, Lancaster
“Macaroni salad.”
Shaun
Woods
33, Wilkes-Barre
“Potato pancakes.”
T.J.
Evanchik
31, Kingston
“A frosty pitcher of beer and
the beautiful NEPA women
who attend the bazaars.”
by Noelle Fabrizio, Weekender Intern
T
o many, the Marley name
might conjure up images
of two things: A reggae
legacy and a pot leaf.
But to Ziggy Marley, the eldest
son of Bob Marley and a suc-
cessful musician in his own right,
there’s so much more to the latter
image than just preconceived
“Harold & Kumar”-esque fodder.
“It’s not just marijuana, it’s the
hemp, it’s the whole plant,” Mar-
ley began in his easy Jamaican
drawl during a phone call from
California last week. “Marijuana
is one part of the plant that is use
for one purpose, you have the
medicinal, the recreational use,
and hemp. Hemp is the industrial
use: Biofuel, the seeds are nutri-
tious, the fibers can be used to
make clothing and material, the
plant helps the soil, it doesn’t
deplete the soil.
“When people think about me
and this plant, usually they do,
‘Oh, Ziggy wants to legalize
marijuana.’ That’s not the whole
part of the story. I want the plant
to be free, I want all people as a
society, as a people, as a planet to
use this natural resource as a
benefit to us, just as we use every
other natural resource, oil, nat-
ural gas, solar, wind … it’s a
natural resource that, for some
reason, we say, ‘Let’s not use this
one.’ Whenever it comes up, it’s
about the whole plant, not just
the smoking of marijuana.”
And just like that oft-misun-
derstood plant and his advocacy
work on its behalf isn’t the only
facet to Marley, a five-time
Grammy winner who made his
recording debut with his siblings
and father in 1979 and went on to
be the lead singer in the family
band, The Melody Makers.
While The Melody Makers last
released an album in 1999, Mar-
ley’s fourth solo effort, “Wild and
Free,” came out last June.
“That’s a good ques-
tion,” Marley replied
with a laugh when asked
what type of setlist he’ll
play at Mount Laurel
Performing Arts Center
in Tamiment Friday June
15. “Some from the new
album with some old
songs, stuff like that.”
While Marley doesn’t
have album No. 5 on his
mind — “Not yet, I’m
waiting until I have some
time,” he said. “When the time
chooses me, it will come, but not
right now.” — can fans expect a
new one from The Melody Mak-
ers anytime soon?
“Yeah, there’s been lots of
talk,” he said, laughing, “but we
haven’t done it yet, maybe soon.”
In addition to touring, his
activism and being a family man,
Marley was the co-executive
producer on “Marley,” a docu-
mentary about his father that was
aptly released on April 20.
“I don’t know about surprises,
but I think (viewers will) feel an
emotional connection to his life,
not just his music but his life, by
this documentary,” his son stated.
“I think that is important.”
Being a father of six, it’s safe
to say that Marley’s children have
influenced his musical tastes of
late.
“I’ve been listening to the
Disney channel for a few days
now; the kids turned me on to it,
you know?” he said, laughing. “I
got caught up in that stuff.” W
Ziggy Marley will perform at the Mount Laurel PAC Friday.
Ziggy Marley / Headshine /
Janci and Berry, Fri., June 15,
7 p.m., Mount Laurel PAC (1
Tamiment Road, Tamiment).
$42.50-$72.50. Info: moun-
tlaurelpac.com, 570.588.2522
Wild and free Marley
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
“Yeah, there’s been lots of talk, but we
haven’t done it yet, maybe soon.”
Ziggy Marley on a possible
Melody Makers reunion
Marley wants people to use the
marijuana plant for more than
just recreation.
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Enter your pet for Weekender’s
PET OFTHEWEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed
if applicable, owner’s name and
hometown to:
weekender@theweekender.com
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner:
Steve & Nita Frey,
Swoyersville
RIVIERA
MAYA
bitch & brag
By Jeff and Amanda of 98.5 KRZ
Special to the Weekender
Jeff’s Bitch:
There’s an ongoing debate in
this country over voter ID, and
it’s ridiculous that we even have
to debate this. The Democratic
party and many minority groups
are taking a number of states to
court simply because the states
want all voters to be able to prove
who they are with a photo ID
when they show up to vote. What
is so wrong with that?
If you want to take a flight,
you must show photo ID. Same if
you walk into a bank to cash a
check, buy alcohol or even get a
tattoo or piercing! Voting is one
of the most important and sacred
rights we have. Is it all that diffi-
cult to pull out some form of ID
for that privilege?
The Democratic party and
various minority groups are
actually suing various states who
are trying to enforce or enact
voter ID laws. They claim that an
ID law would discriminate and
make it harder for minorities to
travel to get a valid ID to vote.
Huh? Are you serious? This is
their argument? If you’re a mi-
nority, it’s harder to travel to get
an ID than a non-minority? Let’s
get effin real here and cut
through the B.S.! By using that
moronic argument, we would
then have to assume that minor-
ities never get tattoos, buy alco-
hol or take flights! It gets even
crazier: Obama’s White House is
even suing Florida to stop them
from purging names from the
voter registration rolls of people
who are deceased or not legal!
Can some please tell me what
happened to good, old common
sense and logic in this country?
My advice is simple: ID in hand
or not, head for the voting booth
this November because we need
to steer this country back to
sanity.
Amanda Brags:
We need your help to
do something really cool
in our
community,
and I’m hoping
you can help
spread the word and
make this event a huge success.
We are attempting to break a
Guinness World Record in
support of skin cancer
awareness!
As you may know from
listening to our show, last
summer I underwent
some procedures after finding
that I had melanoma, the most
serious form of skin cancer. That
frightening experience, along
with this past year’s follow ups
and ongoing skin scans, has
made me brush up on my sun
smarts and want to tell everyone
I encounter to wear sunscreen
and practice sun safety! In sup-
port of skin cancer awareness,
98.5 KRZ, along with Radiation
Medicine Specialists, need your
help to break the Guinness World
Record for the Most People
Applying Sunscreen!
Our world-record breaking
attempt will be Saturday, June 30
from10 a.m.-noon at Radiation
Medicine Specialists (190 Welles
St., Forty Fort).
This is a free event, and we’ll
supply the sunscreen! There will
be music and food, but more
importantly, you can be a part of
a World Record! We’re really
hoping to raise awareness when it
comes to skin cancer and sun
safety by breaking this record
and need your help to make it
happen. Get your group together!
Let us know you’re coming by
registering at 985krz.com. We’ll
only need two hours of your
weekend, so tell your co-workers,
family and friends!
Statistics show most people
start practicing sun safety after
they or someone they know is
diagnosed with skin cancer.
Don’t wait. Start now — and do
it in a big way! I genuinely hope
to see many of you there. Bring
everyone you know and let’s
break a record! W
Amanda needs help breaking the Guinness World
Record for the Most People Applying Sunscreen.
Jeff wants her to smile like that all the way to the
voting booth.
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Happy Hour
Krugel’s Georgetown Deli
720 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd, Wilkes-Barre
Goldencold Lager, Susquehanna Brewing Co.
Wine Snob Pugh
“Holy crap - I think I might
like beer!”
Manhattan Mascali
“Nice, light and familiar”
Dirty Martini
DeBalko
“Refreshing, a little
nondescript, but I like it.”
Shelby Up With
a Twist
“Crisp, light and
refreshing. I’m a fan.”
Johnny Beer
Drinker
“It’s a nice lager with a
small bite.”
American Honey
Husted
“A crisp, drinkable
home-brew taste”
Sampling booze all over NEPA
The Weekender staff brings you our expert opinions (and by
expert we mean not at all) on alcoholic beverages from area
restaurants and bars every other week in the Weekender.
We know, our job is really, really hard.
WANT THE WEEKENDER TO
VISIT YOUR ESTABLISHMENT
FOR A TASTE TEST?
E-mail the name of the business, contact name,
beverage you would like sampled and phone
number to: weekender@theweekender.com,
subject line: Happy Hour
or call 570.831.7398
E
very year, the first week of
June is the most exciting
time to be a gamer as the
industry has a huge convention
called E3 or Electronic Entertain-
ment Expo. Spanning four days,
E3 is the biggest event in gaming
and the place where all of the
console manufacturers and game
publishers have press confer-
ences to unveil all the new things
that are going to come out in the
next year. Unfortunately, I was
not able to attend this year, how-
ever, I did record the whole thing
and watch it at home, all 40
hours worth.
Last year, the biggest announ-
cement was the Wii U, a new
home console from Nintendo.
This year Nintendo’s press con-
ference was devoted to showing
off what the Wii U can do. Most
critics are not impressed with the
Wii U, but I am pretty excited
about it. If you haven’t see it, the
controller looks like a tablet PC,
it has a touch-screen in the mid-
dle and buttons and control sticks
on the sides. The goal of the
console is to appeal more to
hardcore gamers while contin-
uing to bring aboard casual gam-
ers.
Nintendo has shown off some
really interesting ways to play
using the touch-screen controller.
The new system is allegedly
more powerful than any console
on the market right now, and the
controller can act as a screen for
your game. If you are playing a
game and someone wants to
watch TV, you can hit a button
and stream your game to the
controller and keep playing — I
think that sounds pretty cool.
Although Nintendo did a fair
job at showing off its new con-
sole, the thing that diminished
the excitement for the Wii was
the unveiling of new technology
from Microsoft. For me, the most
interesting thing shown off at E3
this year was the new Microsoft
Smart Glass Technology. Xbox
Smart Glass is a companion
application for Xbox 360 avail-
able for Windows Phone, iPhone,
iPad and Android devices com-
ing this holiday season. Smart
Glass will allow all of these
mobile devises to act as a con-
troller or second screen for the
Xbox 360, which is essentially
the same thing Nintendo is do-
ing, thus, Microsoft stole some
thunder from Nintendo. Beside
Smart Glass Microsoft didn’t
show off anything surprising —
while big games like “Halo 4,”
“Tomb Raider” and “Call of
Duty Black Ops 2” all look great,
we heard about all of them last
year.
Sony announced several up-
coming game titles that look very
memorable: “The Last of Us,”
“All-Stars Battle Royale,” “God
of War Ascension” and, most
impressively, a new game from
Quantic Dream called “Beyond:
Two Souls.” Sony also demoed
its innovative Wonderbook which
brings books to life with the use
of PlayStation Eye and Play-
Station Move. The first game to
use Wonderbook is J.K. Row-
ling’s “Book of Spells,” which is
part of the Harry Potter universe
and it looks pretty fun.
Ubisoft stole the show as it
showed off a bunch of new
games, including sequels to
well-known games like “Ray-
man,” “Just Dance,” “Splinter
Cell” and “Assassin’s Creed.” It
also showed a video of the most
impressive looking game at E3
this year: “Watch Dog,” a
ground-breaking open-world
action-adventure that blends
cutting-edge technologies and
sophisticated game design into a
realistic and living open world. It
looks amazing.
This year’s E3 was pretty good,
however, it was not as exciting as
recent years — no new console
announcements and only a cou-
ple surprise games. For me, the
highlights were Microsoft Smart
Glass, “Watch Dogs” and “Assas-
sin’s Creed 3.” None of the big
games are coming out in 2012,
but 2013 is looking to be a really
good year for gaming. W
Nicolas Duclos of Ubisoft Entertainment showcases “Assassin’s Creed III” on the
Nintendo Wii U console at E3.
Impressions of E3 2012
Ubisoft stole the show as it showed off a bunch of new games — and a video of the
most impressive looking game at E3 this year: “Watch Dog,” a ground-breaking
open-world action-adventure that blends cutting-edge technologies and sophisticated
game design into a realistic and living open world. It looks amazing.
W
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PRESENTED BY THE PA JAZZ ALLIANCE & MAGDON MUSIC
TUESDAY, JUNE 26TH AT 7PM
THE RADISSON LACKAWANNA
SEND YOUR NAME, HOMETOWN AND PHONE NUMBER TO:
WEEKENDER@THEWEEKENDER.COM,
SUBJECT LINE: JAZZ CONTEST
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY, JUNE 15 BY 5PM
LAST WEEK’S WINNER:
DARYL CHARLES, WILKES-BARRE TWP.
OPENING ACT:
THE ORGANIK VIBE TRIO
FEATURING MULTI-GRAMMY AWARD WINNING MUSICIAN DAVE SAMUELS
weekender
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SPEAKER JAM KARAOKE/DJ
WHERE EVERYONE’S A STAR!
EVERY WEDNESDAY 9PM-1AM @
FOR WEEKLY SCHEDULE SEE WEEKENDER LIVE PAGE
STATE OF THE ART SOUND AND LIGHT SHOW
BOOKING INFO: SCOTT (570) 861-0634
75 MAIN ST. LUZERNE

Hey, I just met you,
This is crazy
Come play some beer
pong
It’s for cancer, baby.”
If you hate cancer and love
beer pong, Rachel Leggieri has
the perfect Saturday in mind for
you. Diagnosed with Hodgkin’s
lymphoma at 16, the now 24-
year-old Larksville resident has
been cancer-free for six years.
On Saturday, June 16, she will
host “Shoot for the Stars,” an
event to give back to an orga-
nization that helped her during
her treatment.
Leggieri said she fought the
disease and overcame it, but the
time was very difficult for her.
“How do you go through los-
ing your hair when you’re a 16-
year-old girl? How do you go
through not going out with your
friends as much?”
The young cancer survivor told
the Weekender during a recent
phone call she had to go through
cycles of chemotherapy and
radiation for eight months. She
said that although she was very
lucky, she saw that not all chil-
dren faired so well.
“It was a very hard experience,
but a humbling one because I
met a lot of people who aren’t
still here today,” she shared.
Considered cancer-free today,
Leggieri still has yearly checkups
to ensure the cancer has not
returned. She credits the Leuke-
mia and Lymphoma Society with
helping her to understand, at a
young age, what she was going
through while she was battling
Hodgkin’s lymphoma. She said
she knew once she graduated
from college that she wanted to
do something to give back to the
organization.
“Although it was a situation
that no one wants to go through,
it made me appreciate a lot more
things. It made me appreciate the
fact that so many people have to
go through such a harder time
than I had to, and that’s what led
me into being able to work with
the Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society.”
The society has a walk each
year to help raise funds for its
research and to bring help and
hope to those battling blood
cancers. Held locally in Nay Aug
Park in Scranton, participants
carry illuminated balloons of
different colors representing
survivors, supporters and those
lost to cancer.
After Leggieri learned about
the fundraiser, the next step was
raising money to support her
walk. She got to work putting
together “Shoot for the Stars,” a
pong tournament intended to do
more than just get you and your
buddies really drunk.
“I instantly thought of beer
pong because I knew it was
something that could help me
raise the funds I needed for the
walk, and I was excited to be able
to host an event instead of just
going around asking for dona-
tions.”
She turned to friend, Eric Knox
of NEPA Pong for help while
putting together last year’s event.
NEPA Pong is a local league of
All American Beer Pong that
holds pong tournaments in area
bars every week for cash prizes.
“I knew they were local and
would help,” she explained. “Last
year, Eric was great, and they
helped with promoting and
brought so many people to the
event.”
For its second year, “Shoot For
The Stars” will be held at Rob’s
Pub and Grub in Larksville.
Leggieri said owner, Rob Tho-
mas, was instantly on board.
“He is giving free pizza, and
he donated a pitcher of beer for
each team. He was absolutely
great about it and absolutely
willing to help,” she said.
Participants have a chance to
win a number of prizes including
gift cards for local businesses
and movie passes. There will also
be raffle baskets and a 50/50
along with free entertainment.
All money raised will be used
to help reach Leggieri’s fundrais-
ing goal for her upcoming walk,
and every cent goes directly to
the Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society.
“You feel great when you
know you are doing something
for an organization where they
are showing results and survivor
stories and people are coming out
and saying, ‘They really helped
me.’” W
Taking a shot
at cancer
By Noelle Fabrizio
Weekender Intern
Shoot for the Stars, Sat., June
16, 3 p.m., Rob’s Pub and Grub
(232 Nesbitt St., Larksville).
Ages 18-20 and non-participa-
nts $5, 21 and up $10.
Rachel Leggieri, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s
lymphoma at 16, has organized a beer-pong tournament
to raise funds for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.
“How do you go
through losing your
hair when you’re a
16-year-old girl?
How do you go
through not going
out with your
friends as much?”
Rachel Leggieri
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From a Dream....To Her Hallmark Moment
“Because Only The Best
is Good Enough for Me!”
Oyster Wedding at Genetti’s
Oyster Weddings boast elegant décor, decadently delicious food, premium
beverages, and are unlike any other wedding in NEPA.
Your Happily Ever After Comes Complete With:
Specialty Lighting and Sheer White Curtains, Chair Covers, Lush Centerpieces,
Premium Bar Featuring Martini Bar, Handcrafted Beer Bar & Specialty Drinks,
Flaming Dessert Display, Fondant Wedding Cake & Cocktails at the New Poolside Cabana
Call Certified Wedding Professional Lindsay at
570-820-8505
Sign up today for a wedding consultation with Lindsay and receive a free wedding planning guide!
Oyster Weddings & Traditional Genetti Weddings | www.oysterwedding.com & www.genetti.com
“Mommy when I grow up I want
a Genetti Wedding”
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did you know
Primo Hoagies
33B West Side Mall, Edwardsville • 570.287.2722
primohoagies.com
Primo Hoagies
Owners: Courtney, David and Nancy Paden
Manager: Mark Baiamonte
Hours: Monday-Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m.,
Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Opened: Monday, June 11
What makes this hoagie place different:
Everything cut fresh, fresh-bread baked
throughout the day, lots of sides and toppings,
enormous amount of choices, true Italian
hoagies
Special features: Healthy alternatives
including wheat bread, seedless bread and
low-carb wraps
Size of establishment: Seating for 44
people
The decor: Red, white and green, lots of
seating and big-screen TVs
Perks: Hoagie trays available, catering, awards
cards, sells the meat by the pound, delivery for
$25 minimum orders
dish
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
PA TASTES GREAT
For the 22nd time, the Great
Tastes of Pennsylvania Wine &
Food Festival will be held at
Split Rock Resort (100 Mosey-
wood Road, Lake Harmony)
Saturday-Sunday, June 16-17.
Held rain or shine, the outdoor
festival features food and craft
vendors, educational seminars,
music by Daisy Jug Band, The
Barley Boys, George Wesley
and the Irietations, Tribes and
The BC Combo, and wine from
36 wineries from across the state.
Participating wineries include
Maiolatesi Wine Cellars, An-
tler Ridge Winery, Bee Kind
Winery, Blue Mountain Vine-
yard, Flickerwood Wine Cel-
lars, Long Trout Winery, Moon
Dancer Winery, Paradocx
Vineyard, Sand Castle Winery,
Sorrenti’s Cherry Valley Vine-
yards and Vineyard at Hershey.
Advance tickets are $26 and
must be purchased by Saturday,
June 16. Tickets the day of the
festival are $30. For groups of 25
people or more, tickets are $23
per person. Naturally, you must
be 21 to partake of PA’s wines,
but those who are under 21 or are
a designated driver get in for $7.
Children under 2 are free of
charge.
On Sunday, the first 1,000
people will receive a free cork-
screw (under 21 and designated
drivers excluded).
For more info, visit splitrock-
resort.com or call 800.255.7625.
I’M SO ‘BLUE’
After hearing about it for so
long, I finally had the opportuni-
ty to dine at Marty’s Blue Room
(100 Old Newport St., Nanti-
coke) when my mom took me
there to kick off my birthday
weekend Friday night.
Having been there many times
(without me, mind you), Mom
suggested not getting an appetiz-
er because the dinners come with
two sides, so I bypassed starters
like Marty’s famed jambalaya or
catfish fingers. But I did make
up for my loss by choosing farm-
raised catfish “crazy” (as op-
posed to grilled, pan-seared,
honey-glazed, etc), which was
blackened and served over jam-
balaya. For my side, I chose a
salad to counteract the Old Bay
fries I couldn’t resist (it was my
birthday weekend, after all).
Mom went with her usual: Crazy
haddock, a salad and a side of
broccoli.
Both fish were served as four
sizeable pieces over a mound of
jambalaya, which was fantastic.
The fries could arguably be the
best Old Bay fries I’ve had —
golden-fried and crunchy and
dusted liberally with the salty
mix.
Just when we thought we had
no room, our affable server ran
down the list of desserts, in-
cluding a chocolate bread pud-
ding sprinkled with bacon crum-
bles. Immediately in, Mom,
however, took some coaxing,
declaring she’d take just one bite,
but we both pretty much de-
voured this perfect concoction.
The bacon on the chocolate
bread pudding was incredible,
and, mixed with the creamy va-
nilla ice cream, stupendous.
I haven’t shut up about my
excellent experience at Marty’s
since and can’t wait to go back.
Hint, hint.
Marty’s is open Tuesday-Sat-
urday from 5-10:30 p.m. For
more info, call 570.735.7028. To
stalk the menu, visit martys-
blueroom.com. W
The ‘crazy’ catfish at
Marty’s Blue Room.
Marty’s incredible
chocolate bread pudding
with bacon crumbles.
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GEMINI (MAY21-JUNE20)
I dreamt I was an incompetent witch last
night. My broomsputtered and lurched as I
flew. I tried to zap electronic yokes fromthe
necks of unicorns held in thrall, but my
expectantly pointed finger yielded no
spark. Attacked by the harsh, whip-wield-
ing herdmaster, I wove a spell, which fiz-
zled and withered like a dud firecracker.
This dreamhas relevance to you because,
like me, a lot of your actions have felt pow-
erless and some of themhave even back-
fired lately. Also like me, the only real
solution is to laugh heartily at yourself and
have faith things will improve.
CANCER(JUNE21-JULY22)
For someone who’s so good at taking care
of other people, you sure are lousy at nur-
turing yourself sometimes. My heart goes
out to you during those trying moments of
life, when a major crisis (or two or three)
rears its ugly head. It makes me want to just
wrap my arms around you, call in sick to
work for you and stroke your head, telling
you everything is going to be OK. Because
it is. Not only are there people standing by
to help you pick up the slack (you need only
ask), but there are several strong astrologi-
cal indicators that tell me, and nowyou, that
you’re going to be just fine.
LEO(JULY23-AUG. 22)
I half expect you to soar in on your
broomhandle, wicked-witch style, crash-
ing through a windowwith dramatic grace.
Hurling fireballs and curses, you ought to
find yourself the worshipped object of
dozens of observers. See, darkness is in.
And while your brand of tireless goodness
and honesty has its advocates (including
myself), I’minvested in keeping your tribe
at peak effectiveness —which means up-
dating your methods. These days, you’re
bound to accomplish a lot more through
creative mischief and inspired cynicism
than through innocent goodwill. I’mnot
expecting you to advocate real evil (as if
you would), but brandishing the delightful
kind of pretend evil we all revel in every
Halloween will do wonders to help your
image and your impact, too.
VIRGO(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
There’s lots of math in nature. Just look at
pine cones, seashells, even patterns in the
sand made by changing tides. It’s human
constructions that are fraught with chaos,
despite their rigid attempts at order and
control. Living in a city makes it obvious —
despite all the straight lines, right angles
and flat surfaces, it’s actually a very dis-
ordered place. Lately your head has seemed
a little too much like a skyscraper and not
enough like a tree. Instead of forcing
thoughts to spike toward the sky like a spear
or a missile, can you allowthemto grow
gracefully toward it, making an allowance
for some of the forces that surround you?
LIBRA(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
The Bible’s not the only place that men-
tions the Great Flood. Many stories world-
wide tell of this mythic calamity. According
to NewAge folklore, the continents of the
fabled ancient civilizations, Atlantis and
Lemuria, didn’t sink —they were sub-
merged by the Flood and all evidence of
their existence was erased by the incredible
power of 40 days and nights of rain. The
bad news: You’re in the middle of your own
Great Flood. The good news: The continent
of your greatest weakness is being covered
so entirely that by the time the sun cracks
the clouds on the 41st day, all memory of its
actuality will be completely washed away.
SCORPIO(OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
You old blowhard! No, I mean that in the
best way —you’re practically a force of
nature this week. In fact, you have so much
primitive, elemental power at your disposal
you might have trouble deciding what form
to take. Wonder Twin powers, activate!
Your energy could take a focused shape,
like a time-eating, villain-pursuing alliga-
tor, or a bolt of righteous lightning. Or, you
could choose a more general form, like a
hurricane or a life-giving desert rain. As an
earthquake, you’d measure at least 6.9 on
the Richter scale. Nowthat you’ve been
declared a temporary deity, what shape will
your life-changing whimsies take? I guess
it depends on who you’d like to worship
you.
SAGITTARIUS(NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
It’s all going to be OK. I’ve noticed that
as long as you hear this periodically, things
really are OK. It doesn’t matter if the senti-
ment is sincere. It’s true as soon as you
decide it is. That’s why I’mthrilled to share
with you the truth about your current sit-
uation: You’re exactly where you’re sup-
posed to be. You’re also way cooler than
you think you are, even when you act dorky
or do stupid shit. Whenever you next run
face-first into a glass door, knowthis —it’s
just practice for the skill that’ll serve you
best in the months to come: Laughing at
yourself.
CAPRICORN(DEC. 22-JAN. 19)
You’ve spent years living in your head,
Cap. Sometimes I think you’re happier
there. But there’s a vast audience clamoring
for you to make an appearance. Emerge
frombackstage, if only for a cameo. The
standing ovation I expect you’ll receive
should whet your taste for applause. You’re
always putting off your brilliance for “the
right moment.” I hate to destroy this cher-
ished illusion, but for most of us, the right
moment is whenever we create it. You’ll
have an easier time creating your first tenta-
tive openings to display your dreamy genius
this week than you ever have before. Shine!
AQUARIUS(JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
Most of the Aquarians I knowbelieve in
ghosts. Fairies, witches and monsters under
the bed are no big stretch for members of
your clan, either. You’re used to dwelling in
the realmof the possible, the land of hope
and dread. Rationality and hard science are
your uneasy allies at best and sworn foes at
worst this week. I encourage you —don’t
doubt yourself. You knowwhat you know,
and you nowhave the power to make it real.
The realmof the possible has just expand-
ed; it nowincludes anything and everything
you set your mind to.
PISCES(FEB. 19-MARCH20)
Every energy-conversion systemin-
volves some waste or loss of energy. It’s a
lawof physics. But you’re incredibly effec-
tive at converting thought into action this
week. Three trips to the gymwill practical-
ly have you lifting cars, an hour on the
Internet will enable you to effortlessly
recite hilarious filth for the amusement of
all your companions, and a visit to the
church of your choice may almost be
grounds for canonization. The only things,
in fact, that don’t seemto be operating at
superhuman levels are your decision-mak-
ing skills. Cut out the equivocation and just
make up your mind already.
ARIES(MARCH21-APRIL19)
I admire your strength. It’s almost a
shame to tell you that the world you’re
hefting around on your eminently capable
shoulders has an orbit of its own and
doesn’t actually need carrying. That’s right,
this huge burden that’s been exhausting you
and slowing your steps to a weary stagger
isn’t actually yours. It doesn’t even belong
to someone else —it’s the kind of weight
you can just let go of. So what are you
waiting for? Just drop the thing, and get the
hell out of the way. Then go get ice creamor
something. You deserve it.
TAURUS(APRIL20-MAY20)
Even Bulls who must slave like Cinderel-
las never give up hope of fairy godmothers,
rich, generous uncles, winning lottery
tickets or other magical reversals of for-
tune. It’s human nature to wish for unlikely
windfalls, even though you cynically know
they’re highly unlikely. The bad news is
you’re not due for another surprise inher-
itance or karma-free miracle for at least
another two or three months. The good
news is you’re nowuniquely empowered to
grant your own wishes, be your own fairy
godmother and ignore all rules or limita-
tions regarding your assets turning into
pumpkins at midnight. W
To contact Caeriel, e-mail
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CHRIS EVANS
June 13 1981
LUCY HALE
(pictured)
June 14 1989
NEIL PATRICK HARRIS
June 15 1973
ABBY ELLIOTT
June 16 1987
VENUS WILLIAMS
June 17 1980
PAUL MCCARTNEY
June 18 1942
ZOE SALDANA
June 19 1978
sign language
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car and bike
1st Annual Summer Fest
Poker Run June 30, registration
10 a.m.-noon, Sheppton American
Legion Post 616. $15/drivers, $10/
passengers, $5/poker hands. Poker
hand prize 5 p.m., ages 18+; fireworks
9 p.m. All vehicles welcome. Food,
drinks, tricky trays, door prizes,
50/50. Info: 570.956.8794, 751.3441.
Proceeds benefit VA Hospital, Wilkes-
Barre.
2nd Annual Christmas in
July Motorcycle Run July 22,
registration 1 p.m., blessing/bike
mount, 2 p.m. Begins Salvation Army
(17 S. Pennsylvania Ave, Wilkes-
Barre), ends Konefal’s Grove, Chase.
Rain or shine. $20/riders. New toys,
monetary donations accepted. 3-8
p.m., food, entertainment, door
prizes, kids’ activities, petting zoo,
more. Walk-ins: $20/adults, $10/ages
5-10. Proceeds benefit The Salvation
Army. Info: 570.824.8741
6th Annual Stephanie Jallen
Motorcycle Run July 8, regis-
tration 9:30 a.m., depart noon, St.
Barbara Church grounds (28 Memo-
rial St., Exeter). Rain or shine. $15,
includes $10 meal ticket. $5 non-
riders, food/beverage not included.
Music by Iron Cowboy, more; raffles.
Vendors welcome, call 570.690.3028.
Info: stephaniejallen.org
13th Annual Ann Yurista
Memorial Road Rally to Ben-
efit The Helping Hands So-
ciety July 28, registration 10 a.m.-
noon, run leaves noon, ECUS Club
(20th and Peace Streets, Hazleton).
Ends Harwood Fire Company. $15.
Entertainment, food, beverages.
Tricky, trays, raffles, gift certificates.
Grand prize drawing for Myrtle Beach
vacation. Benefits HH Society of
Greater Hazleton.
Black Creek Cruiser Car
Show
• June 30, 2 p.m. Rock Glen Park.
$3/car. Fireworks. Call 570.384.3629
for info.
Coal Cracker Cruisers Car
Club (570.876.4034)
• Cruise Nights at Advance Auto (Rt.
6, Carbondale): July 6, Aug. 3, Sept.
7, 6-9 p.m. Food, music, door prizes,
50/50, trophies. Food by Boy Scout
Troop 888.
• Old Home Week Festival: Aug. 4,
5-9 p.m., Main St., Forest City. Music,
food, prizes, homemade pie contest,
vendors.
•14th Annual Car Show: Sept. 16,
gates open 9 a.m., Carbondale High
School.
Fairway Chevrolet Ultimate
Corvette Show June 23, 11
a.m.-2:30 p.m., 1101 N. Church St., Hazle
Twp. Rain date June 24. Free admis-
sion. Trophies, new and used Cor-
vettes on sale. 100 +Corvettes on
display. Food vendors. Richie Molina-
ro and Mr. Lou.
Gunners PA Law Enforce-
ment MC (gunnerspa-
lemc@gmail.com, $20/rider, $10/
passenger unless noted otherwise)
• Ride for Ruth’s Place: July 21,
registration 10 a.m.-noon, details to
be set. Benefits Ruth’s Place. Food,
entertainment to follow.
• Gunners Cancer Ride: Aug. 11,
registration 10 a.m.-noon. Begins/
ends Jefferson Park, corner N. Main
St. and New St., Pittston. Benefits
Homechek and Hull, whose families
have been affected by cancer, and
cancer research.
• Phantom Rider Program: If unable
to make it to ride, donate $10 pas-
senger fee and new stuffed animal,
which will go to children in need, any
left end of season go to Toys For
Tots. Send to Gunners 11 Hemlock Dr.,
Tunkhannock, PA 18657.
Hi Lites Motor Club (www.hili-
tesmotorclub.com, Jack
570.477.2477, John 574.7470). Events
feature door prizes, food, music,
50/50 drawing, more. No alcohol
permitted.
• 2012 Cruise In-Car Show: June 16,
5-8 p.m., Wegmans Food Store,
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Rain date June 17.
• July 21, 5-8 p.m., Twist & Shake,
Pikes Creek. Rain date July 22.
• Aug. 11, 1-4 p.m., Meadows Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center (55 W. Center
Hill Road, Dallas). Rain date Aug. 12.
• Aug. 18, 5-8 p.m., Twist & Shake,
Pikes Creek. Rain date Aug. 19.
Montage Mountain Classics
• McDonald’s Southside Shopping
Center: July 13, Aug. 10, Sept. 14, 6-10
p.m.
• Jonny Rockets Montage Mountain:
June 16, July 21, Aug. 18, Sept. 15, 5-9
p.m.
• Cruise Pittston-Tomato Festival
Parking Lot: June 30, July 28, Aug.
25, Sept. 29, 5-9 p.m.
• St. Joseph’s Center Car Show: Aug.
19, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Pittston Commons
on the Pittston bypass. Rain date
Aug. 26.
Pocono Motorcycle Ride to
Benefit America’s VetDogs
Aug. 19. Special surprise feature. Info:
kogrady@ptd.net, dog1@ptd.net
Uncle Buck’s BBQ Pit Bike
Night Wed., 6-9 p.m., 361 W. Main
St., Plymouth. Food, drink specials.
W
E-mail your event to
weekender@theweekender.com
or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline
for publication: Monday at 2
p.m. two weeks prior to event.
Tips
By Janelle Engle
Special to the Weekender
from a
barbie chick
W
hen I was approached to
walk in the RAW Phila-
delphia talent/fashion
show for stylist Safia Khan
alongside a number of other fresh
new designers, I was equal parts
thrilled and intimidated. Al-
though I’ve been modeling for a
good while now, I had yet to ever
be in a runway show. Getting
runway experience is like getting
your first after school job —
everybody wants you to have
experience, but nobody wants to
be the first to give it to you.
Every cliche you hear about
behind the scenes of a runway
show is absolutely true. There’s
the stereotypical man in charge,
better dressed and more frazzled
than everybody else yelling at
models, photographers and de-
signers alike making sure every-
thing is in place. Buzzing, nerv-
ous designers (or, in my case,
stylist) who fly from model to
model making sure everything
fits perfect. All the while, press
and interviews are being held in
every inch of free space and all
around the rest of the room,
there’s bored models lounging
since they’ve been through all
this many times before, and then
there’s me, completely wide-eyed
soaking as much of the chaos in
as I possibly could.
The thing I did not realize until
I was a part of the madness is
there’s a lot of waiting involved.
In fact, almost six hours worth
before the show started. Just
when I was seriously considering
a way I can nap without messing
up my carefully styled hair, it’s
suddenly announced we go on in
10 minutes and a ripple of excite-
ment goes through the air from
the designers and the models.
Waiting for the show to start
was nothing compared to waiting
backstage to go on. Backstage is
the equivalent of being in line to
go on a roller coaster, huge smile
on your face but a body full of
complete terror in the pit of your
stomach. I closed my eyes, tried
to shake the queasy feeling and
opened them to see a woman
with a headset motioning me that
it’s my time.
I don’t think I ever had a big-
ger adrenaline rush than I ever
did on that runway. It’s exhilarat-
ing, terrifying and amazing all in
one. I got off and immediately
wanted to go back on. It’s an
addiction like no other. I’ll never
forget that feeling, and I wanted
more the minute I got off. Then a
tap on my shoulder, a designer
was missing two models, and
they wanted me to walk again! I
couldn’t say yes fast enough and
was off for a change of clothes
and a quick touch-up on makeup
before hitting the runway a sec-
ond time. This time for Totem
Sun, a clothing company that
makes feel-good designs on
hoodies and T-shirts.
The experience in a runway
show has me even more in love
with fashion that I ever was.
Whether it’s modeling, styling or
designing, I hope everybody in
love with fashion gets to experi-
ence behind the scenes of a fash-
ion show, seeing all the hidden
craziness makes the final rhythm
of the actual show look even
more breathtaking. W
Walking
the walk
Janelle got her first taste
of the runway ...
... and is ready for her
second.
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weekender
Miss Pocono Downs 2012
Start Practicing Your Pagent Wave!
“SIZZLING GIRLS OF THE SUN”
SWIMSUIT CONTEST
Friday, July 20th at Pocono Downs Racetrack
Racing Post Time: 6:30pm
Judging starts at 7:00pm with contestants appearing in swinsuits
before a panel of judges. Winner annonced after the
12th live harness race.
HOW TO ENTER:
To enter, women ages 21-35 should send two photos
(one headshot and one full body shot), along with your name,
address, phone number and brief bio to:
Sizzling@theweekender.com
DEADLINE FOR ENTRES:
FRIDAY, JULY 13TH AT 11:59PM
First prize: $1,000 cash, luxurious spa package
from the Saphire Salon and flowers
1st Runner Up: $500 cash and a Sapphire Salon gift card
2nd Runner Up: $250 cash and a Sapphire Salon gift cardt
For more information,
visit mohegansunpocono.com.
Sponsored by Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs,
Sapphire Salon, and the Weekender.
Hair, makeup and complimentary gift bags for all
finalists provided by Sapphire Salon
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100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@theweekender.com
theweekender.com
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150 Special Notices
NEPA-AIRSOFT
North Eastern PA
Airsoft
WHAT IS AIRSOFT?
Airsoft is a military
simulation sport in
which players par-
ticipate in mock
combat with mili-
tary-style replica
weapons & tactics.
Come visit us at:
www.nepa-
airsoft.com
A Web Site
Dedicated to the
Airsoft Community
in NorthEast
Pennsylvania and
surrounding areas.
Home of the
Patriots Airsoft
Squad
We are always
looking for New
Members!
Contact us today
at:
webadmin@
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LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm

ADOPTION:
Loving couple
hopes to adopt a
baby. We
promise a lifetime
of love & security
for a newborn.
Please call
Lori and Mike at
1-888-499-4464
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SHOTTO LAW, P.C.
Affordable Family
Law Services. PFA,
Divorce & Custody.
Mike@Shottolaw.com
570.510.0577
Major Credit Cards
Accepted
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
360 Instruction &
Training
Certified Personal Certified Personal
T Trainer seeking rainer seeking
part-time position part-time position.
Also certified in
older adult training,
CPR and AED.
contact
Mryc426@aol.com
403 Aircraft
TRAVELCRAFT ‘93
28’ Motorhome
52,000 miles
$12,000 negotiable.
570-333-5110
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07 FOCUS
SES Sedan
Alloy wheels, heat-
ed seats, CD play-
er, rear spoiler, 1
owner, auto, air, all
power, great gas
mileage, priced to
be sold immedi-
ately! $6,995 or
best offer.
570-614-8925
NISSAN `06
MAXIMA SL
Immaculate condi-
tion, low miles, all
power. $13,500, Call
570-237-2412
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$40,900. call
570-760-2365
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HONDA ‘08 ACCORD
4 door, EXL with
navigation system.
4 cyl, silver w/
black interior. Satel-
lite radio, 6CD
changer, heated
leather seats, high,
highway miles. Well
maintained. Monthly
service record
available. Call Bob.
570-479-0195
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
412 Autos for Sale
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS ‘99 GS
Silver, 4.6L, V8,
Auto, power steer-
ing, power brakes,
power windows &
locks. 104k, New
Inspection! Great
Condition! Call
570-823-4008
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
38,500 miles. Black
with beige interior. 6
speed transmission.
Air & CD player.
Excellent condition.
$17,600. Call
570-868-0310
SUBARU `07 LEGACY
62K miles. Original
owner. Maintenance
regularly performed.
Excellent condition.
Fully loaded. AWD.
No mechanical
issues ever. $13,500
570-237-5882
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
421 Boats &
Marinas
SILVERCRAFT
Heavy duty 14’ alu-
minum boat with
trailer, great shape.
$1,250.
570-822-8704 or
cell 570-498-5327
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. 6 speed.
Cruise control. Back
rests, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories.
19,000miles. $13,250.
Williamsport, PA
262-993-4228
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
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412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
545 Marketing/
Product
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
412 Autos for Sale
545 Marketing/
Product
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
D on’t w a it
for g a sp r ice s
to re a ch $5.00 / g a llon
G e t you r V E SP A now
a nd SAV E $$$ a t
TE A M E F F O RT CY CL E
12 80 Sa nsSouciPk w y,H a noverTw p,Pa .1870 6
570 -82 5-4581 w w w .tea m effortcycle.com
NOW HIRING CLASS A
OTR DRIVERS
Van Hoekelen Greenhouses is a family owned
business located in McAdoo, PA. We have
immediate openings for reliable full-time
tractor trailer drivers, to deliver product to our
customers across the 48 states. Our premier
employment package includes:
PLEASE CONTACT SHARON AT
800-979-2022 EXT 1914,
Mail resume to P.O. Box 88, McAdoo, PA
18237 or Fax to 570-929-2260
Visit our website at
www.vhgreenhouses.com
for more details.
Requirements are: Valid Class A CDL, minimum 1 year OTR
experience, must lift 40lbs, and meet driving and criminal
record guidelines
• Hourly Pay- including paid detention time,
and guaranteed 8 hours per day
• Safety Bonus - $.05/mile paid quarterly
• Great Benefits - 100% paid health insurance,
vision, dental, life, STD, 401K, vacation time,
and holiday pay.
• Pet & Rider Program
• Well maintained freightliners and reefer trailers
• Continuous year-round steady work with home
time
Community Advocate
LUZERNE COUNTY HEAD START, INC. is
seeking a full time COMMUNITY ADVO-
CATE to research and write grants, promote its
programs and services, and to oversee commu-
nity relations and event planning. This position
is responsible for the research and development
of new funding opportunities. In addition to out-
standing interpersonal communication and
organizational skills, including some website
management, qualified candidates must possess
a Bachelor’s Degree at a minimum, and have
extensive public relations, grant writing, techni-
cal writing skills and event planning experience.
LCHS offers an excellent compensation and
benefit package in addition to an excellent work
environment. To be considered, please submit a
resume, cover letter describing experience,
salary requirements and three letters of refer-
ence from employers to:
Lynn Evans Biga, Executive Director, PO Box
540, Wilkes-Barre PA 18703-0540. Fax #570-
829-6580. Current ACT 34, ACT 151 and FBI
Clearances are required for employment.
E.O.E. M/F/V/H. NO PHONE CALLS
Two person crew, no experience necessary,
company will train. The work is outdoor,
fast-paced, very physical and will require the
applicant to be out of town for eight day intervals
followed by six days off. Applicants must have a
valid PA drivers license and clean driving record.
Starting wage is negotiable but will be no less than
$14.00 per with family health, dental and 401k.
ENTRY LEVEL
CONSTRUCTION LABORER
Apply at R.K. Hydro-Vac, Inc.
1075 Oak St., Pittston, PA 18640
E-mail resume to:
tcharney@rkhydrovacpa.com
or call 800-237-7474
Monday to Friday8:30 to 4:30
E.O.E. and Mandatory Drug Testing.
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
KAWASAKI `07 NINJA
EX650R. Low
mileage. Blue. 1
owner. Excellent
condition, garage
kept. No accidents.
$3,000
570-831-5351
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras, includ-
ing towing, hitch
equipment & sway
bars. Satellite dish
& stand. Reduced.
$10,900. Selling
due to health
issues.
570-842-6735
442 RVs & Campers
WINNEBAGO ‘81
LOW LOW MILES
42,000+
ALL NEW TIRES
GREAT PRICE
$4000
CALL
570-825-9415
AFTER 5 PM
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$5,495. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $6995.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
Professional
Experienced Roofers
Experience in rub-
ber and shingle.
Must be profession-
al and knowledge-
able. Good pay.
Steady work.
Call 570-654-4348
524 Engineering
A local Engineer-
ing/Environmental
Services Firm is
seeking a
CIVIL/SITE WORK
DESIGNER
proficient in the use
of AutoCAD for their
Tunkhannock Office.
Site grading,
drainage and layout
design experience
is required for
design of large
scale commercial,
residential and/or
Oil and Gas devel-
opment projects.
Knowledge of PA
DEP’s Erosion and
Sediment Control
BMP Design Manual
and Pennsylvania
Stormwater Best
Management Prac-
tices Manual a plus,
but not required.
Please submit
resumes to hr@
jhacompanies.com
or visit our website
at www.jha
companies.com.
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
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FREE STATE INSPECTION AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!
Coccia Ford is not
responsible for any
typographical errors.
See dealer for details.
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
STARTING AT TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
STARTING AT TO CHOOSE FROM
FROM TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
10K MILES!
TO
CHOOSE
FROM
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554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
MACHINIST MACHINIST
INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN ELECTRICIAN
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC MAINTENANCE MECHANIC
MAINTENANCE TRAINEE MAINTENANCE TRAINEE
Fabri-Kal Corporation, a major thermoforming plastics company
has immediate full-time benefited openings.
Machinist: Traditional machine shop methods & equipment,
repair/modification of tooling & production components, fabrication
of parts. Formal Machine Shop training by a technical school,
state certification or a minimum of 6 years experience required.
Industrial Electrician: Conduit, EMT and ridged pipe; Equip-
ment testing; AC/DC motors and drives; PLC systems. 3 Yrs
Exp. HS/GED required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Mechanic: Troubleshooting, hydraulic/pneumatic, machine shop,
plumbing, welding, rebuild mechanic devices, schematics, test
equipment, basic electrical systems. 3 Yrs Exp. HS/GED
required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Maintenance Trainee: Associates Degree in Electronic field or
Technical Certification in Electronics to include AC/DC Fundamen-
tals, Industrial Electricity, Motor Controls, AC/DC Drives, PLC’s,
Basic testing equipment/Multi-meter/Amp probes.
Drug & Alcohol screening and background checks are conditions
of employment. Competitive wage and benefits package: Health
Insurance, Prescription, Dental & Vision, Disability, 401K, Educa-
tion, Paid Leave.
Apply on site: Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM;
or forward resume to:
Fabri-Kal Corporation
ATTN: Human Resources
Valmont Industrial Park
150 Lions Drive, Hazle Township, PA 18202
FAX: (570) 501-0817
EMAIL: HRPA@Fabri-Kal.com
www.f-k.com
EOE
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
MANAGER/
BARTENDER
The River Street
Jazz Cafe
Part Time for an
established club, 3
nights a week,
experience neces-
sary. Excellent
Opportunity. Call
Lois 822-2992
NORM’S
PIZZA & EATERY
Now hiring
DELIVERY DRIVERS &
KITCHEN
Call 821-7000
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTO MECHANIC
Excellent wages.
No weekends. Must
have experience
with own tools and
Inspection & Emis-
sions License.
Call Jerry @
570-650-7265
AUTOMOTIVE TIRE
STORE MANAGERS
Mavis Discount
Tire/Cole Muffler
is currently hiring
professional, moti-
vated and experi-
enced tire store
managers, & assis-
tants. Experienced
candidates who
have a proven
record of running
and working in an
extremely high vol-
ume tire store or
repair shop should
apply. We have ren-
ovated many of our
stores and our busi-
ness is growing.
Our employees are
very well compen-
sated so please call
914-804-4444
or e-mail resume to
cdillon@mavistire.com
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
MAI NTENANCE MAI NTENANCE
Self - starter with
good work ethic
needed for 2 Apart-
ment buildings in
Pittston. Position
requires basic
plumbing, electrical
& apartment prep
skills, janitorial &
grounds mainte-
nance. Emergency
response required.
Full–time 40 hours/
week. Fax resume
to 570-654-5739 or
email to
Exeter@ndcrealestate.com
EOE
536 IT/Software
Development
PHP WEB DEVELOPER
Growing distributor
seeking a full-time,
qualified PHP Junior
Developer to join a
programming team
that creates and
maintains multiple
ecommerce web-
sites. Bachelors in
an IT related field is
preferred. Experi-
ence with OOP in
PHP, as well as
XHTML, JavaScript,
and CSS are
required. Benefits
include health,
vision and 401K with
match. To apply,
send your resume
to
devjobs@newglobal.com
Windows based
Computer
Network
Specialist
in Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Area.
Email resume to:
nepacomp
netw@gmail.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers: Getting
Home is Easier.
Chromed out trucks
with APU's.
Chromed out NEW
PAY PACKAGE! 90%
Drop & Hook CDL-A,
6 months experi-
ence 888-406-9046
Drivers: $2,500
Sign-On Bonus!
New Pay Increase!
Home Nightly
Hazleton, PA Dedi-
cated Run. CDL-A, 1
year experience
required. Estenson
Logistics. Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
554 Production/
Operations
CNC OPERATOR
Experience
Required.
Full time day shift.
570-740-1112
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
FABRICATOR
Pittston area plastic
vacuum forming and
fabrication company
seeks an individual
with machine shop
and CNC experi-
ence. Full time posi-
tion. Plastic knowl-
edge a plus. Send
resume to
MPC
PO Box 30
Mountaintop, PA
18707
554 Production/
Operations
MANUFACTURING
NIGHT SHIFT
MACHINE OPERATORS
NEEDED
$9.00/hour to start.
60-90 day evalua-
tion with $ increase
$ based on YOUR
performance, atten-
dance etc. Benefit
Package includes:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insur-
ance, Vacation, Hol-
iday pay PLUS
Full-time 12 hour
shifts on alternating
3 & 4 day work
weeks. Every other
weekend a must.
Previous manufac-
turing experience
preferred. Some
heavy lifting.
Accepting applica-
tions at:
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC.
20 Elmwood Ave.
Crestwood Ind’l Pk
Mountaintop, PA
18707. EOE
We are a drug free
workplace.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Summer Help
Needed Immediately
HAND PACKER/
PRODUCTION
McAdoo employer
looking for reliable,
hard-working pro-
duction workers.
Workers will plant,
select, clean, wrap,
and package potted
plants in boxes.
• Temporary/
Seasonal Work
• $8.15/regular hour
and $12.23/over
time hour
• Hours are Monday
through Friday
7am-4pm, with
overtime as
needed
• Must be able to lift
up to 40lbs, stand
for 8.5 hours or
more per day, per
form repetitive
duties, bend, push,
pull, reach, work in
a fast-paced and
dusty environment,
and must be avail
able for mandatory
overtime including
weekends
• No experience
required, must be
16 years or older,
and have a work
permit if 16 or 17
years old
Serious applicants
may apply in person
at our office located
at 220 S. Hancock
St., McAdoo, PA
18237. For more
information contact
our Sharon at
570-929-1914.
VAN HOEKELEN
GREENHOUSES, INC.
P.O. Box 88
McAdoo, PA 18237
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
DELIVERY/PARTS
SALES
Full time for our
Wilkes-Barre store.
Competitive hourly
wage plus benefits.
Entry level, experi-
ence helpful but not
necessary. Must
have valid PA
license. Apply in
person at any Cee-
Kay Auto location.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
MRG
EXCLUSIVE CASINO
RESORT RETAILER
IS LOOKING FOR
SUPERVISOR
& SALES
ASSOCIATES
WE OFFER A
GREAT BENEFITS
PACKAGE!!!!
QUALIFIED CANDI-
DATES CAN APPLY IN
PERSON AT OUR MAR-
SHALL ROUSSO STORE
IN MOHEGAN SUN
CASINO, ON-LINE AT
www.marshall
retailgroup.com
OR FAX YOUR RESUME
TO 609-317-1126
A PHENOMENAL
PLACE TOWORK!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000.to $200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
We’re ready –Are
you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
610 Business
Opportunities
LIQUOR LICENSE
For Sale Luzerne
County / City of
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Asking $25,000.00
Call: 201-315-2210
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
710 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONERS
Two $75. each.
570-301-3801
STOVE Maytag elec-
tric, beige $100.
Frigidaire refrigera-
tor, white, $125.
Sears large capacity
electric dryer, white
$100. Maytag wash-
er, white, commer-
cial quality, 17 cycles
$120. Kenmore
5200 btu air condi-
tioner $65. Moving
sale. 570-908-9256
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
WEST PITTSTON
CEMETERY
2 lots, prime loca-
tion. Retail price
$500/each. Selling
for $800/both.
570-654-4534 or
570-654-6425
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BEAUTIFUL
PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE
King sized sleigh
bed, with end
table, mirror, 2
dressers, 1 with
mirror. Excellent
condition,
Asking $3,000.
Please call
570-472-9616
COUCH/SOFA living
room. Excellent
condition. $125.
570-301-3801
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED, queen Size
frame head & foot
board, rails includ-
ed, oak wood $100.
Tall dark wood
dresser $25. Twin
child's tundra frame
$100. Green/tan
plaid couch &
matching chair
$180. Dark cherry
wood desk $25.
Set of 2 dark wood
end tables with
wicker baskets $20.
19” Sylvania TV $40.
Moving sale call
570-908-9256
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. OAK
$50. 570-824-9607
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
Mattress:
A Queen Size
Pillow Top Set
Still in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628

744 Furniture &
Accessories
MOVING SALE MOVING SALE
White Canadelx
counter height
kitchen set with 4
swivel chairs, enter-
tainment center,
coffee table, dining
room set with serv-
er, living room blue
Drexel sofa, 2 wing
back chairs and
tables, large oak
cherry entertain-
ment center, new
black leather reclin-
er, sofa & loveseat
& much more. Call
570-288-5555
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
756 Medical
Equipment
FAMILY ALERT
Senior medical
alert system.
$17.95 month.
1-877-787-2261
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
P
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6
4
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
468 Auto Parts
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
468 Auto Parts
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI METALS
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487
GOLD - SILVER
COINS - JEWELRY
Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM
No nonsense guarantee
We will beat any competitors
advertised price by up to 20%
SHIPPING/RECEIVING DEPARTMENT
Part Time with potential for Full on
First & Second Shift (Sunday-Thursday)
We are seeking energetic individuals with
distribution experience and a great work ethic
for 1ST/2ND shift. We offer a competitive start-
ing wage with potential for rapid increase based
on performance.
Interested individuals should apply in person at:
Keystone Automotive Operations, Inc.
100 Slocum Ave., Exeter, PA 18643
570-655-4514
Fax: (570) 655-8115
E.O.E. M/F/D/V
“Invisible Fence” technology keeps
dogs safer. Training is provided to
operate ditch witch and install under-
ground wire and components. Full
time physical job. Must have good
math skills, clean driving record and
be courteous.
Must pass physical & drug test.
INVISIBLE FENCE INSTALLER
Fill out application in person
Invisible Fence of NEPA
132 No. Mountain Blvd. Mountaintop
No phone calls
Hydroseed and soil erosion control
experience helpful. Valid drivers
license a must. Top wages paid.
Unlimited overtime.
Apply in person.
8am-4pm. Monday-Friday.
1204 Main Street
Swoyersville
Varsity Inc.
No Calls Please. E.O.E.
Landscape Personnel
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$375 AND UP
ALSO BUYING
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
H
758 Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER ITEMS
Coleman stove,
propane for camp-
ing $15. Coleman
stove for camping
$15. Oriental rug
with trim, very good
condition, best offer.
570-825-6772
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
776 Sporting Goods
SHUFFLEBOARD
with an electric
scoreboard. 21’
long. Excellent con-
dition. Asking
$2450.
570-675-5046
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD
GUARD PUPPIES
Raised on ranch
with other working
dogs. Great with
children. $300 each
570-578-4503
COCKAPOO
11 weeks old.
Male, $500
570-250-9690
LABRADOR
RETRIEVERS
AKC registered.
Chocolate & black.
Vet certified.
females, $475,
males, $425.
Ready 6/22/12.
Deposit will hold.
570-648-8613
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SAINT BERNARD PUPS
Pure bred - no
papers. Born April
21st. Parents on
premises.
3 females, 1 male.
Vet checked. First
shots and
dewormed.
$300.00 each. Call
(570) 825-0745
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Registered. Male.
Vet Checked. Call
570-436-2762
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
HANOVER TWP.
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
(570)696-1041
LUZERNE COUNTY
Secluded 3 level
home on 15 acres
located in Black
Creek Township
(near Hazleton).
Detatched garage.
Private gated drive-
way. Call
570-459-8658
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
225-227 Boston Ave
Double block.
Wyoming Area
schools. Out of flood
zone. 1 side rented
to long term tenant
at $525 /month.
Other side remod-
eled - move in or
rent at $650/month.
3 bedrooms each
side, gas furnaces,
sunrooms, large
yard. $149,000. Call
570-357-0042
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
5 bedroom, 1 bath.
Garage. Corner lot.
Nice location. Out of
flood zone. $30,000
negotiable. Call
570-814-7453
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
FOR SALE
5 Unit
Money Maker
Available immedi-
ately. Fully rented,
leases on all five
units. Separate
utilities, new roof
in 2007, 3 new
gas furnaces, off
street parking for
6 vehicles, 3 bay
garage. Over
$29,000 in rents.
A true money
maker for the
serious investor.
Must Sell!
$145,000.
Call Steve at
(570)468-2488
915 Manufactured
Homes
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home in great con-
dition in park.
$18,000. Financing
available with
$3,000 down. Call
570-477-2845
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
Very large,
remodeled, 2
bedroom
apartment, some
utilities & stove
included. Nice
backyard. Available
immediately
$725.00 a month
Call 570-842-0740
no calls after 8pm.
DUPONT
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room townhouse
style apartment.
Lots of closet
space, with new
carpets and com-
pletely repainted.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer hook up.
Nice yard & neigh-
borhood, no pets.
$595 + security. Call
570-479-6722
EXETER
Large Colonial
home, 1st floor, 2-3
bedrooms, remod-
eled tiled bath,
hardwood floors, 3
season sunroom,
laundry room, large
eat-in kitchen with
stove&refrigerator,
gas heat/water,
large yard with
maintenance includ-
ed. Room A/C’s,
5 ceiling fans,
4 entrances
with porches,
1 car garage, and
new windows.
$925/month
+ utilities. Lease
and security.
Call 570-407-3600
FORTY FORT
COMING
UNITS
(check availability)
America Realty
Efficiencies
$500+ utilities
288-1422
Remodeling in
progress, all 2nd
floors, all new
kitchen appli-
ances, laundry,
parking. 2 year
leases, No pets
or Smoking,
Employment
application
mandatory.
NANTICOKE
Completely renovat-
ed 1 bedroom apart-
ment. $450 + 1st,
security & electric.
516-216-3539
or 570-497-9966
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
W
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P
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6
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Seductive
Seductive
Pleasures
Pleasures
570-899-3354 570-899-3354
S P E C IA L S ! S P E C IA L S ! S P E C IA L S !
O P E N 24/ 7 N O W H IR IN G ! O P E N 24/ 7 N O W H IR IN G ! O P E N 24/ 7 N O W H IR IN G !
242 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
H E AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
HO T E N O UGH F O R Y O U?
IT ’S C O O L AT T HE S PA!
$10 O F F AN Y S E RV IC E
W IT H C O UPO N . E X PIRE S 6 - 20- 12.
2
0
6
5
3
9
SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
M IA & TIF F ANY AR E B ACK !
COM E M E E T D E ANNA!
L ACE Y IS B ACK !
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
COM E SE E AL E X IS
& GE T $10 OF F
ANY SE SSION!
2
5
3
8
8
5
The Aroma A Spa
405 N. River Street • Wilkes-Barre
ORIENTAL SHIATSU
BODY MASSAGE
570-991-8566
10 AM
to 10 PM
DAILY 2
9
3
7
3
8
7
0
7
1
8
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Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
7
2
8
8
3
2
7
2
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888888888
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2
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3333333333333333
hot talk, local slngles
MeegztMeoI
B7O.BO4.Ø040
Get your local number: 1.800.811.1633
18+ www.vibeline.com
F
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IA
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7
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1
7
8
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ULTIMA II
1-866-858-4611
570-970-3971
CALL TO HEAR
OUR DAILY
SPECIALS!
NOW HIRING
PART TIME & FULL TIME
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
7
4
7
0
1
8
ELITE SPA
N E W S TA F F !
Orien ta l S ta ff
Body S ha m poo
M a ssa ge-Ta n n in g
318 W ilkes-Ba rre Tow n ship Blv d., R ou te 309
L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.852.3429
7
4
9
8
8
5
2
5
7
6
7
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539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e
570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k
Or ie n ta l Sta ff
M a ssa g e
B od y Sh a m p oo
Ta n n in g
Sa un a
539 SPA
7
5
2
2
4
6
19 Asian
Spa
Open 7 Days 10am-11:30pm
FEATURING BODY AND
FOOT MASSAGES
$10 OFF HOUR
SESSIONS
570-337-3966
Unit 19A Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
South Rt. 309
Hazleton
(entrance on
2nd floor)
FREE
PARKING PPAARRK KINNNGG
570-861-9027
Spa 21
B E A U T IF U L Y O U N G
A S IA N G IR L S
Profes s iona l
M a s s a ge
Open 7 days
9:30 am -11 pm
Fash ion M all
Rt. 6
7
5
7
9
7
8
570-341-5852
7
6
0
4
8
3
Incall/Outcall 24/7
Escort, Massage,
Domination
Super-Hot TranSexual
in Town!
Five-Star Experience”
That will leave
you Satisfied!
Great For The
Straight Man!
Satisfaction Guaranteed!!
GOOD with First Timers!
36DD, 22, 34
TS VERONICA TS VERONICA
323-863-3495 323-863-3495
www.theweekender.com www.theweekender.com
P
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941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over-
sized executive
style apartment
in large historic
home. Two bed-
rooms, one bath,
granite kitchen,
hardwood floors,
dining room, liv-
ing room, base-
ment storage,
beautiful front
porch, washer/
dryer. $1,100
monthly plus util-
ities. No smok-
ing. Call
570-472-1110
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
LARKSVILLE
Very clean 2nd
floor. 2 bedrooms.
Heat included.
$500/month.
Call 570-696-2357
NANTICOKE/ALDEN
Two level, 1 bed-
room, quiet neigh-
borhood, off-street
parking, newly
renovated. All appli-
ances included.
$470/month.
Call 570-441-4101
WEST PITTSTON
1ST FLOOR, 5 ROOMS
Recently renovated.
All appliances,
washer/dryer hook-
up. Wall to wall car-
peting & window
dressings. Off street
parking. $600 per
month + utilities,
security & refer-
ences. No smoking.
No pets. Call
570-574-1143
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, refrig-
erator & stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, large yard.
No pets. $600/
month, plus utilities
& security.
570-237-2076
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 1 bedroom
Eat-in kitchen,
stove, refrigerator,
disposal. Full bath
Living room, den
washer/dryer in
basement. $600/
month + electric.
References, credit
check, security + 1st
month. No smoking,
no pets.
570.262.0671
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
2 Apartments
available.
Both located on
2nd floor,
spacious, clean, 2
bedroom apart-
ments.Screened
porch and deck,
all appliances
included,
$600+utilities plus
1 month security,
no pets. 2nd
apartment
$550+utilities and
security, not all
appliances includ-
ed. Both have
Garage available,
and are in walking
distance to
Wilkes University.
570-650-3008 or
570-881-8979
WILKES-BARRE
NEAR ASHLEY
1st floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living &
dining rooms &
kitchen. Refrigera-
tor & gas stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets.
$475/month + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
(570)655-4298
Line up a place to live
in classified!
WYOMING
2nd floor efficiency,
1 room, kitchen,
bath, back porch,
attic storage. Land-
lord pays cable TV,
all utilities, but elec-
tric. $450 + security.
570-362-0055
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WYOMING
2nd floor.
Completely remod-
eled. Large, 2 bed-
room + den/com-
puter room/office.
Hardwood floors,
new carpeting in liv-
ing room & dining
area. Washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking, no
pets. Great loca-
tion! $750/month +
utilities, security &
references. Call
(570) 885-1922
944 Commercial
Properties
MEDICAL OFFICE
Suite for lease in
modern building in
Avoca. Designed
for 2 physicans.
2,800 sq ft, 6 exam
rooms, large recep-
tion area, break-
room/kitchen, file
room, 2 restrooms,
lab area, 2 private
offices. Excellent
condition. Close to
I-81. 50+ parking
spots available.
570-954-7950
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
OFFICE SPACE
Located on Main St.,
Avoca, within pro-
fessional building.
Small Office. $650,
all utilities included.
570-457-2945
PITTSTON
Office Space & Liv-
ing Quarters
$525/month
Call (570)883-1062
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
3,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
Carey’s Patch
Nice yard, quiet
area. 2 bedroom.
Carpeted. Washer /
dryer hookups. Gas
heat / water. $600 +
security & utilities.
570-821-7005
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off-street park-
ing, no pets, totally
remodeled. $500/
month, + utilities &
security. Available
immediately.
Call Brian
570-299-0298
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Newly renovated 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
off street parking, all
appliances, internet,
satellite included.
Large rooms &
basement. $700 +
utilities + security. 1
year lease. Call
570-417-9540
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
3 bedroom half dou-
ble. Off street park-
ing. Pets welcome.
$550/mo. Credit /
Criminal check
required. Call
570-266-5333
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
Single home in
gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Granite
countertops, hard-
wood floors, gas
fireplace, appli-
ances included.
Quiet 55 plus com-
munity. No Pets.
One year lease.
$1675/mo + utilities
& security. Monthly
maintenance fee
included.
570-592-3023
HAZLETON
E EA AG GL LE E R RO OC CK K
R RE ES SO OR RT T
Gated Community.
4 bedrooms, 3 full
baths, and 1.5 bath.
Beautiful custom
home, finished
basement, stone
fireplace, many
many amenities,
including swimming
pool, golf, tennis,
skiing, fitness cen-
ter, among more...
Located on a
lakeview property,
Quiet & Secure,
$1200/per month,
For rent OR for
sale. Please call
215-416-2497
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLAINS
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
Semi modern
kitchen, full base-
ment, stove and
refrigerator
included. no pets,
no smoking.
$650/per month.
570-430-2532
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, close
to Kings and down-
town. Includes
range & fridge.
$700/month, first,
last & security. Ten-
ant pays heat, elec-
tric & water. Call
718-791-5252 or
718-877-7436
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
DUCTLESS A/C
$84.00 per
month
Call 570-736-
HVAC
(4822)
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
ROOFING & SIDING.
Kitchens & Baths.
Painting. All types
of construction.
Free Estimates. 35
years experience.
570-831-5510
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
BGD CONCRETE
We Specialize in
All Phases of
Concrete Work
We Also Seal Coat
Asphalt Driveways
No Job Too Small!
570-239-9178
COVERT & SONS
CONCRETE CO.
Give us a call,
we’ll beat
them all!
570-696-3488 or
570-239-2780
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Licensed - Insured
Certified - Masonry
Concrete - Roofing
Quality
Craftsmanship
Guaranteed
Unbeatable Prices
Senior Citizen
Discounts
Free Estimates
570-574-4618 or
570-709-3577
1057Construction &
Building
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs &
hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Garden till-
ing. Spring Clean
ups. Accepting new
customers. Weekly
and bi-weekly lawn
care. Fully Insured.
20+ year experience
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
1165 Lawn Care
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
1183 Masonry
CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
steps, porches,
chimneys & repairs.
Quality craftsmanship
by an affordable
professional.
570-283-5254
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet
Refinishing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1252 Roofing &
Siding
ABSOLUTELY FREE
ESTIMATES
E-STERN CO.
30 year architec
tural shingles. Do
Rip off & over the
top. Fully Insured
PA014370
570-760-7725 or
570-341-7411
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Roofing specialist,
call today and
save$$$
570-574-4618
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
We’ll run your ad in the
classified section until your
vehicle is sold.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNLLLLLLLLYONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNE LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEADER.
timesleader.com
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
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Rt. 11 S. Plymouth Twp.
570.779.4145
Rt. 11 S. Plymouth Twp.
570.779.4145
HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4:30-6:30
$2.50 DOMESTIC BOTTLES
OPEN DAILY: MON- SUN 1PM-2AM
SATURDAY, JUNE 23RD
NATIONAL RECORDING ARTIST
“DAKOTA” - LIVE 9-12
15.00 ADV. TICKET SALES • 20.00 AT DOOR
TICKETS ON SALE WEEK OF JUNE 11
FREE BUFFET AND VARIOUS RAFFLES
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
RONNIE WILLIAMS LIVE
9:30 TO 1:30
MONDAY, JUNE 18
KARAOKE W/
DJ HARD DRIVE @8
DANCERS
WANTED CALL
570-332-1887
BACHELOR PARTYS
WELCOME ON FRIDAYS
& SATURDAYS
Look What
You Missed
Scranton Zine Fest @ New
Visions Studio & Gallery
Photos by Jason Riedmiller
Holistic Spa, Tanning
Holistic Spa, Tanning
& Wellness Center
& Wellness Center
WALK INS WELCOME
OR BY APPOINTMENT
9AM- MIDNIGHT MON.-TUES.
9AM-1AM WED.-SAT.
570-714-3369 or 570-406-3127
697 Market St. Kingston
Shannon (formally the Spa), Kellie,
Kenrda, Elizabeth Black, Rachel.
Misty Mystique, Jazmine, Tonya
Hiring Tropical girls! Call for details.
BODY HEALING, TANNING, BODY HEALING, TANNING,
REIKI, AND MASSAGE — COME REIKI, AND MASSAGE — COME
RELAX WITH US! RELAX WITH US!
TO ADVERTISE IN TO ADVERTISE IN
THE THE
WEEKENDER WEEKENDER
CALL 831.7349 CALL 831.7349
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MAN OF
THE WEEK
Age: 26
Hometown: Scranton
Status: Taken
Occupation: Allied Services, drummer for
EverRage, and certifed personal trainer
Favorite Weekender feature:
Model of the Week
Favorite body part: Stomach
Favorite sport : Frisbee actually, even
though most wouldn’t consider it a sport
Favorite hangout: The garage
Worst dare someone made you do:
Defnitely had to be when I was dared to
get naked around some unsavory people
Guilty pleasure:
Sleeping in too often. I am not a morning
person
Opposite sex pet peeve:
Sloppy kissers and when girls wear
clothes that are obviously way too small
for their size
Funniest thing that happened in traffic:
When I was at a light, and I saw a lady in
the Burger King drive-through in a Jazzy!
If you could have a one-night stand
with anyone, no strings attached, who
would it be?
If my girlfriend doesn’t count, I’d probably
have to say Megan Fox
NICHOLAS MICHAEL CONROY
weekender
TO ENTER, SEND TWO RECENT PHOTOS TO MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
Include your age, full name, hometown and phone number. (must be 18+)
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF NICHOLAS, VISIT US AT THEWEEKENDER.COM
PHOTOS BY NICOLE ORLANDO • SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE WOODLANDS
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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MODEL OF
THE WEEK
Age: 20
Hometown: Glen Lyon
Status: Single
Occupation: Lab assistant at Geisinger
Favorite Weekender feature:
Man and Model of the Week
Favorite body part: Eyes
Favorite Sport: Field hockey
Most embarrassing moment?
Spilling food on a man’s lap while waitressing
What wouldn’t you do for a million dollars?
Touch or be near bugs!
If you could have a one night stand with
anyone, no strings attached, who would it be?
Ryan Reynolds
One thing you always keep in your
purse/wallet?
Food!
Worst dare someone made you do?
Pull over to a person walking and Silly
String them
Guilty pleasure?
Cheesy ’90s music
One thing most people don’t know about you:
For a girl my size, I have a loud mouth!
If you were to switch teams, which celeb
would you go for?
Mila Kunis
TO ENTER, SEND TWO
RECENT PHOTOS TO
MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
Include your age, full name, hometown and
phone number. (must be 18+)
weekender
KAYLA CZAPRACKI
HAIR AND MAKEUP PROVIDED BY SAPPHIRE
SALON AND DAY SPA
Hair & Make-Up Cassie Lavelle
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF KAYLA,
VISIT US AT THEWEEKENDER.COM
PHOTOS BY NICOLE ORLANDO
WARDROBE PROVIDED BY BRATTY
NATTY’S BOUTIQUE
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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June 22, 23, 24, 2012
Celebrate the beauty,
splendor, and
cultural significance
of a regional treasure,
the Susquehanna
River
• Friday, June 22nd - Kick-off the Festival on Friday evening! Register for a
short paddle from West Pittston to Wilkes-Barre or Join us at the Millennium Circle Portal,
Wilkes-Barre River Common as we “Awaken the Dragon” in preparation for Dragon Boat
training and racing throughout the weekend. Free Family Fishing, Children’s Mural, Live
Music, and Dragon Boats on Display!
• Saturday, June 23rd - Join the Festival at Nesbitt Park for an afternoon of
Fun and Activities for All Ages! 12:00pm to 5:00pm Live Music performed by Don
Shappelle and the Pickups
• Sunday, June 24, 2012 - Dragon Boat Racing on the
Susquehanna 10:00am to 3:00pm Join us on the Wilkes-Barre River Common
to watch as Dragon Boat Teams Race on the Susquehanna River. WKRZ will be
broadcasting live and calling the races on the Common. Root for your favorite team to win!
Enjoy a day along the River.
RiverFest Concert on the Common - 5:00pm to 9:00pm Live Music
5:00pm Three Imaginary Boys
6:00pm RiverFest Opening Ceremonies - Awakening of the Dragons
6:30pm Tribes 7:45pm George Wesley
Car Show and Concert on the River Common - Millennium Circle Portal,
Wilkes-Barre River Common 6:00pm to 9:00pm Explore the Classic &Antique Car show
presented by NEPA Region Antique Automobile Club of America. Enjoy hits of the 60’s,
70’s and 80’s performed live by Flash Back. Check out the Chevy Volt, a plug-in electric
and gas car presented by Bonner Chevrolet.
Te Wilkes-Barre Riverfront Parks Committee
Presents RiverFest 2012
Live Mammals Program
(1:30pm)
Live Birds of Prey
Program (3:30pm)
Guided Nature Hikes
Environmental Exhibits
SUNDAY JUNE 24
Dragon Boat Racing 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
KRZ providing music and calling the races
SOJOURN ON THE RIVER
Mandatory safety training will be given to all participants before the launch by the Outfitters.
• Friday, June 22, 4-7pm - West Pittston to Wilkes-Barre
• Saturday, June 23, 8am-2pm - Harding to Wilkes-Barre
• Sunday, June 24, 8am-2pmWilkes-Barre to Hunlock Creek
To Register for the Sojourn
Contact One of the Outfitters
ENDLESS MTN. OUTFITTERS
at 570-746-9140 www.emo444.com
SUSQUEHANNA RIVER ADVENTURES
at 570-328-4001 www.susqpaddle.org/
SUSQUEHANNA KAYAK & CANOE RENTAL
at 570-388-6107 www.kayaktheriver.com
For More Information and Directions to the Park:
Penn State Cooperative Extension
570-825-1701 or 602-0600
Visit www.riverfrontparks.org
Photo by M. Burnside
Children’s Nature Crafts
Face Painting
Magician
Make a Fish Print T-Shirt
Kids Tree Climb
Children’s Field Games
Pony Rides
Moon Bounce
Kayaking Demos
Dunk Tank
Dragon Boat
Team Training
Photo by M. Burnside
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L.T. VERRASTRO, INC. * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200
classic margarita - lemonade - black cherry
mike’s summer feature
available at the following NEPA distributors
24-12oz cans
$
28
99
or less
+tax
LACKAWANNA
A CLAUSE INC. .......................................................................................... CARBONDALE
BEER CITY U.S.A. ................................................................................ S WASHINGTON AVE
BREWERS OUTLET ........................................................................................... DUNMORE
CADDEN BROTHERS ........................................................................................ LUZERNE ST
CROWN BEVERAGE ................................................................................. CLARKS SUMMIT
CLARKS SUMMIT BEVERAGE ...................................................................... CLARKS SUMMIT
FLANNERY BEER DISTRIBUTORS .................................................................. MOOSIC ST
HARRINGTON’S DISTRIBUTING ......................................................................... MINOOKA
JOE’S BEERMAN ................................................................................................ PECKVILLE
MANCUSO BEER BARON .............................................................................. CARBONDALE
NORTH POCONO BEVERAGE ........................................................................... BILL’S PLAZA
OK BEERMAN ....................................................................................... KEYSER & OAK ST
OLYPHANT BOTTLING COMPANY ....................................................................... OLYPHANT
PIONEER DISTRIBUTING ........................................................................... GREENRIDGE ST
SUSQUEHANNA
CLIFFORD BEVERAGE ............................................................................................ CLIFFORD
DRINKER CREEK BEVERAGE .......................................................................... SUSQUEHANNA
MONTROSE BEVERAGE ...................................................................................... MONTROSE
WAYNE
HONESDALE BEVERAGE ..................................................................................... HONESDALE
WAYMART BEVERAGE ............................................................................................ WAYMART
WYOMING
B&RDISTRIBUTING....................................................................................... TUNKHANNOCK
LAKE WINOLA BEVERAGE ............................................................................ LAKE WINOLA
PLAZA BEVERAGE ...................................................................................... TUNKHANNOCK
WYOMING COUNTY BEVERAGE ..................................................................... TUNKHANNOCK
LUZERNE
B & S DISTRIBUTOR ....................................................................................... MOCONAQUA
BEER SUPER .................................................................................................. WILKES-BARRE
J & M UNION BEVERAGE...................................................................................... LUZERNE
LAKEWAY BEVERAGE ................................................................................................. DALLAS
MIDWAY BEVERAGE .......................................................................................... WYOMING
MOUNTAIN BEVERAGE ............................................................................................... PLAINS
NANTICOKE BEER DISTRIBUTOR ............................................................................ NANTICOKE
PIKE’S CREEK BEVERAGE .................................................................................... PIKE’S CREEK
PLAZA BEVERAGE .................................................................................................. PITTSTON
QUALITY BEVERAGE OF NEPA ...................................................................................... LAFLIN
THRIFTY BEVERAGE .............................................................................. SAN SOUCI PARKWAY
WYCHOCK’S BY-PASS BEVERAGES .................................................................. WILKES-BARRE
WYCHOCKS MOUNTAIN TOP BEV ................................................................... MOUNTAINTOP
WYOMING VALLEY BEVERAGE .................................................................................... EXETER
WYOMING VALLEY BEVERAGE ........................................................................EDWARDSVILLE
HAZLETON AREA
BUTLER VALLEY BEVERAGE,INC. ................................................................................ DRUMS
JIMBOS FREELAND PARTY BEVERAGE ...................................................................... FREELAND
JOJO’SBEVERAGESTORE............................................................................. HAZLETOWNSHIP
PARTYBEVERAGE............................................................................................... CONYNGHAM
QUALITY BEVERAGE .......................................................................................... HAZELTON
T VERRASTRO ...................................................................................................... HAZLETON
CARBON
ALL STAR BEER ................................................................................................. SUMMIT HILL
CARBON BEVERAGE ............................................................................................ WEATHERLY