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The New York Times
4 min read
Psychology

What Happens to Creativity as We Age?

WHEN WE’RE OLDER, WE KNOW MORE. BUT THAT’S NOT ALWAYS AN ADVANTAGE. One day not long ago, Augie, a 4-year-old Gopnik grandchild, heard his grandfather wistfully say, “I wish I could be a kid again.” After a thoughtful pause, Augie came up with a suggestion: Grandpa should try not eating any vegetables. The logic was ingenious: Eating vegetables turns children into big strong adults, so not eating vegetables should reverse the process. No grown-up would ever come up with that idea. But anyone with a 4-year-old can tell similar stories. Young children’s creativity seems to outstrip that of even
Nautilus
10 min read
Self-Improvement

Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite: Think you can read people’s emotions? Think again.

You’ve probably met people who are experts at mastering their emotions and understanding the emotions of others. When all hell breaks loose, somehow these individuals remain calm. They know what to say and do when their boss is moody or their lover is upset. It’s no wonder that emotional intelligence was heralded as the next big thing in business success, potentially more important than IQ, when Daniel Goleman’s bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence, arrived in 1995. After all, whom would you rather work with—someone who can identify and respond to your feelings, or someone who has no clue?
Nautilus
6 min read
Happiness

No, You Can’t Feel Sorry for Everyone: The idea of empathy for all ignores the limits of human psychology.

The world seems to be getting more empathetic. Americans donate to charity at record rates. People feel the pain of suffering in geographically distant countries brought to our attention by advances in communications and transportation. Violence, seen on historical timescales, is decreasing. The great modern humanitarian project of expanding the scope of our empathy to include the entire human race seems to be working. Our in-group (those we choose to include in our inner circle and to spend our energies on) is growing, and our out-group (everybody else) shrinking. But there’s a wrinkle in thi
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck
Alex K., Scribd Editor
From the Editors

Unconventional, pragmatic advice…

The book flies in the face of so much conventional self-help wisdom that it’s hard not to label the book as anti-self-help. And yet, that label undermines how pragmatic the book actually is. In the overcrowded, oversaturated, over-clichéd self-help genre, this is is a book well worth whatever f*cks you can muster.